Gender, migration and the global race for talent

Description
The global race for skilled immigrants seeks to attract the best global workers. In the pursuit of these individuals, governments may incidentally discriminate on gender grounds. Existing gendered differences in the global labour market related to life course trajectories, pay gaps and gendered divisions in occupational specialisation are also present in skilled immigration selection policies. Presenting the first book-length account of the global race for talent from a gender perspective, Gender, migration and the global race for talent will be read by graduate students, researchers, policy-makers and practitioners in the fields of immigration studies, political science, public policy, sociology and gender studies, and Australian and Canadian studies.
Rights Information

Afghanistan, Aland Islands, Albania, Algeria, American Samoa, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antarctica, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bouvet Island, Brazil, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Christmas Island, Cocos [Keeling] Islands, Colombia, Comoros, Congo [DRC], Congo [Republic], Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cote d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Falkland Islands [Islas Malvinas], Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, French Guiana, French Polynesia, French Southern Territories, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Guatemala, Guernsey, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Heard Island and McDonald Islands, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Macedonia [FYROM], Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar [Burma], Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, North Korea, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tokelau, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Turks and Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Venezuela, Vietnam, Wallis and Futuna, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, Saba, Curaçao, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin, French part, Sint Maarten (Dutch Part), South Sudan

Endorsements

The race in the labour market to attract skilled immigrants seeks the best workers on a global scale. In the pursuit of these individuals, governments may incidentally discriminate on gender grounds. Gender, migration and the global race for talent presents the first book-length account of the global race for talent from a gender perspective. Existing gendered differences in the global labour market relate to life course trajectories and pay gaps. Gendered divisions in occupational specialisation are also present in skilled immigration selection policies. This book analyses the gendered terrain of skilled immigration policies across twelve countries and thirty seven skilled immigration visas. It argues that while skilled immigration policies are often gendered, this outcome is not inevitable and that governments possess considerable scope in policy design. Explaining the reasons why governments adopt more or less gender aware skilled immigration policies, it brings attention to the engagement of feminist groups and ethnocultural organisations in the policy process. It draws upon 128 elite interviews undertaken with representatives of these organisations, as well as government officials, parliamentarians, trade unions and business associations in Australia and Canada over the period 1988-2013. Gender, migration and the global race for talent will be read by students, academics, policy-makers and practitioners in the fields of immigration studies, political science, public policy, sociology and gender studies, as well as Australian and Canadian studies.

Reviews

The race in the labour market to attract skilled immigrants seeks the best workers on a global scale. In the pursuit of these individuals, governments may incidentally discriminate on gender grounds. Gender, migration and the global race for talent presents the first book-length account of the global race for talent from a gender perspective. Existing gendered differences in the global labour market relate to life course trajectories and pay gaps. Gendered divisions in occupational specialisation are also present in skilled immigration selection policies. This book analyses the gendered terrain of skilled immigration policies across twelve countries and thirty seven skilled immigration visas. It argues that while skilled immigration policies are often gendered, this outcome is not inevitable and that governments possess considerable scope in policy design. Explaining the reasons why governments adopt more or less gender aware skilled immigration policies, it brings attention to the engagement of feminist groups and ethnocultural organisations in the policy process. It draws upon 128 elite interviews undertaken with representatives of these organisations, as well as government officials, parliamentarians, trade unions and business associations in Australia and Canada over the period 1988-2013. Gender, migration and the global race for talent will be read by students, academics, policy-makers and practitioners in the fields of immigration studies, political science, public policy, sociology and gender studies, as well as Australian and Canadian studies.

Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: September 2018
  • 9781526133748 / 1526133741
  • United Kingdom
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: College/higher education; Professional and scholarly
  • Publish State: Published
  • Dimensions: 234 X 156 mm
  • Reference Code: 11419