• Humanities & Social Sciences

      People Centricity

      The Incredible Power of Putting Other People First

      by Stephen Hewett

      “Stephen is the life guru for our times.”—Mark Price, MD, Deputy Chairman of the John Lewis Partnership Would you like to have any — or all — of these? Good health? Financial security? Personal, emotional, and sexual gratification? The enjoyment of the happiness and health of the people who are dear to you? An occupation you find absorbing, fascinating, and lucrative? Agreeable leisure-time activities? A faith you find important, whether religious or secular? An overwhelming sense of positivity in yourself? The feeling that you are a good person and that you generate good outcomes for yourself and for the people you care about and work with? Anything else that makes you feel most happy? If you have all the happiness you can handle, that’s great! Put this book down and move along. If not, then you need to put the power of People Centricity — the life philosophy of making an investment of time and emotional energy to advance the agenda of people with whom you have a mutually beneficial interaction who are outside your immediate close circle — to work in your life. People Centricity is a philosophy to take you through life. It’s all about learning how to understand and share the feelings of other people so as to produce the best mutually beneficial outcome for those other people and for you. From your personal interactions to your business success and beyond, Stephen Hewett will guide you on this life-changing journey, one that will make your bad days good and your good days wonderful. “Stephen’s philosophy of Customer Centricity is at one with my own. Customer Centricity really is the core of business. Stephen is a customer guru of our times.”—Mark Price MD, Waitrose & Deputy Chairman of John Lewis Partnership “Stephen certainly practices what he preaches and is one of the few consultants that really listen to what their customer is trying to achieve. He gave us some key insight that helped us to really shape our future strategy.”—Jo Foley Senior Director, Retail Change ASDA “Led by the impressive Stephen Hewett, their laser-like focus on the customer stood them apart in our minds…”—Jack Upton, Director, Training, Education and Customer Services, McDonald’s UK “In essence, what Stephen have helped us do is to allow everyone at Argos to be brilliant with customers.”—Perry Price, Argos Customer Lead

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2008

      Hindu Pilgrimage

      A Journey Through The Holy Places Of Hindus All Over India

      by Sunita Pant Bansal

      As humans, we lead a life full of struggle and strife. During trying moments, we might knowingly or unknowingly indulge in actions that may be sinful. After a certain time, the wrong actions start weighing us down, and our conscience prods us to atone for our sins. That is when we consider visiting a teertha, where we can go and ask for forgiveness. Such a spiritual journey is termed as a pilgrimage or teertha yatra, which is one of the distinguished facets of Hinduism. Though, undertaking a religious journey is not mandatory in this religion, still a number of Hindus visit the teerthas every year in search of peace and enlightenment. Most of the teerthas are located in calm and secluded places surrounded by the pristine Beauty Care of nature. These places may be near a water source, a mountain or a forest. Their environs are further sanctified by the presence of the holy men and their regular mantra chanting. Such places provide immense peace to the soul. Hindu Pilgrimage - The Teerthas takes you on a mental journey to such spiritual places in India. The book discusses in detail Chaar Dhaam, Himalayan Chaar Dhaam, Sapt Puri, Dwadash Jyotirlingam, Panch Sarovar, Sapt Sarita, Divya Desam, Shakti Peetha, Yatras and also some of the famous temples in India. Enhanced with vivid and exclusive pictures, the book brings the places alive and inspires one to make a pilgrimage to these holy shrines.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2012

      Project Human Being

      by Antonio Meneghetti

      It is a marvellous excursus on the various details that arouse curiosity and pain in every person's solitary life. It is a clinical-existential survey, accomplished with competence by a great expert on the psychic processes of the mind. Ontopsychology is a radical new vision that ranges from science to philosophy to art; most of all, however, it aims for all of these to be healthy and vital. The constant verification of any science answers the following questions: does it produce life? Can it cure? Can it develop? Can it offer metaphysical security to people in progress? This is the only criterion of truth for the human being. Not only does this new frontier of modern psychology possess a scientific methodology that is completely different from the schools that have existed up to go now, but it also contains the process that gives logic and realization to responsible people. This book is aligned with the primary purpose of Ontopsychology: how the Ego's consciousness should be revised, in order for it to perform ontological knowledge, where the Ego's ideas and images are able to give truth and functionality to its own existence. That is, choosing the right, good practice of self-realization. Above all, for one's own health and counsciousness.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2011

      Environmental and Social Justice in the City

      Historical Perspectives

      by Geneviève Massard-Guilbaud and Richard Rodger (eds)

      The world is full of environmental injustices and inequalities, yet few European historians have tackled these subjects head on; nor have they explored their relationships with social inequalities. In this innovative collection of historical essays the contributors consider a range of past environmental injustices, spanning seven northern and western European countries and with several chapters adding a North American perspective. In addition to an introductory chapter that surveys approaches to this area of environmental history, individual chapters address inequalities in the city as regards water supply, air pollution, waste disposal, factory conditions, industrial effluents, fuel poverty and the administrative and legal arrangements that discriminated against segments of society.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2015

      Anne Frank's Tree

      Nature’s Confrontation with Technology, Domination, and the Holocaust

      by Eric Katz

      In this important and original interdisciplinary work, well-known environmental philosopher Eric Katz explores technology’s role in dominating both nature and humanity. He argues that technology dominates, and hence destroys, the natural world; it dominates, and hence destroys, critical aspects of human life and society. Technology causes an estrangement from nature, and thus a loss of meaning in human life. As a result, humans lose the power to make moral and social choices; they lose the power to control their lives. Katz’s argument innovatively connects two distinct areas of thought: the fundamental goal of the Holocaust, including Nazi environmental policy, to heal the degenerate elements of society; and the plan to heal degraded natural systems that informs the contemporary environmental policy of ‘ecological restoration’. In both arenas of ‘healing’, Katz argues that technological forces drive action, while domination emerges as the prevailing ideology. Katz’s work is a plea for the development of a technology that does not dominate and destroy but instead promotes autonomy and freedom. Anne Frank, a victim of Nazi ideology and action, saw the titular tree behind her secret annex as a symbol of freedom and moral goodness. In Katz’s argument, the tree represents a free and autonomous nature, resistant to human control and domination. Anne Frank’s Tree is rooted in an empirical approach to philosophy, seating complex ethical ideas in an accessible and powerful narrative of historical fact and deeply personal lived experience. The book is essentially a meditation on the opposing themes of domination and autonomy as they relate to the uses of technology in environmental policy and in the genocidal policies of the Holocaust. Rather than an abstract, or theoretical, examination of the concepts of ‘domination’ and ‘autonomy,’ the book undertakes a robust pragmatic investigation into the ways in which these themes ‘cash-out’ in specific real-life or historical situations. It is a work in ‘empirical’ or ‘historical’ philosophy, for the meaning of the philosophical ideas and the arguments used to justify them flow out of a detailed understanding of historical and practical reality as well as personal lived experience. The overall argument of the book is this: There is a connection between the destruction of nature and the destruction of specific human cultures, although this connection is not often perceived or understood. The analysis of environmental problems dealing with the degradation of natural systems is generally seen as distinct from the analysis of human historical problems such as war, imperialism, and genocide. But on the level of practical or physical reality, it can be seen that science and technology plays a significant and crucial role in this connection; moreover, on the conceptual level, the ideology of domination and control is the connecting theme. By the examination of several case studies or historical examples, we can see the pervasive power of the idea of domination expressed through the development and use of science and technology. Technology dominates, and hence destroys the natural world; it dominates, and hence destroys, critical aspects of human life and society. In this realm of technological domination, humans lose the power to make moral and social choices; they lose the power to control their lives. To avoid or overcome this evil of domination, we must turn to the ideas of autonomy and freedom as our primary goals of the development and use of technology. Anne Frank’s tree can serve as a symbol of the resistance to domination and oppression and the need for the preservation of freedom and autonomy both in human society and in the natural world.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Nietzsche on Consciousness and the Embodied Mind

      by Manuel Dries

      Nietzsche’s thought has been of renewed interest to philosophers in the Anglo-American philosophical community as well as to philosophers of a more phenomenological and hermeneutic background. The volume aims to appeal to both communities of scholars as it seeks to deepen the growing interest in and appreciation of Nietzsche’s contribution to our understanding of the mind. The 16 essays by leading Nietzsche scholars examine Nietzsche’s understanding of consciousness and investigate its continuities with current developments in philosophy of mind, neuroscience, neuroethics, psychology, linguistics, and metaphysics. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2016

      Die Jüdische Revolution

      Untersuchungen zu Ursachen, Verlauf und Folgen der hasmonäischen Erhebung

      by Johannes Christian Bernhardt

      In 168 BCE, the Seleucid King Antiochus IV intervened against the Temple cult in Jerusalem, resulting in a revolt by the Hasmoneans that led to their establishment as high priests and to the independence of Judea. This study examines the causes and the consequences of the revolt as an historical process and offers a political-theological interpretation of the events. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2017

      Handbook Global History of Work

      by Marcel van der Linden, Karin Hofmeester

      A comprehensive survey of labour historiography around the world, including contributions on the definition of work, descriptions of various kinds of work and different types of labour relations. Reflects upon on people'sattitudes towards work; workers'organizations and strikes, the incentives that made people work and the various types of migration that are work related. Covers the period from 1500 onwards. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      Gelingende Konflikttransformation in der arabischen Welt

      Die Mediationserfolge der Könige

      by Kathrin Warweg

      Mit der Mediation Marokkos im Mali-Konflikt zeigt die Autorin ein Best Practice-Beispiel für eine gelungene Konflikttransformation im nordafrikanischen Raum auf. Sie untersucht die Erfolgsfaktoren der Mediation kultursensibel und entwickelt Handlungsanleitungen, die angesichts der Dringlichkeit von nachhaltigen Lösungen für ethnopolitische Konflikte den aktuellen Wissenschaftsdiskurs und die politische Praxis inspirieren wollen. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences

      FAKEBOOK (FRAUDEBOOK)

      WHAT THE SOCIAL NETWORK IS DOING TO US

      by Vicente Serrano Marín

      1.6 billion users share their lives without a second thought of the consequences. This book highlights the dangers of taking Facebook at face value. Social networks have taken society by storm and now stand at the heart of our day-to-day lives. Despite their undeniable upsides across all spheres of life, from one-to-one communication to politics and the economy, they pose obvious dangers as tools of control and manipulation. This essay goes far beyond such dangers however, delving into the hidden and seemingly innocent, harmless elements that give shape to life on Facebook: the notion of biography, the concept of friendship, the approval behind the "Like" button… Using straightforward language and in keeping with the very finest classical and modern schools of thought, Vicente Serrano’s Fakebook reveals just what social networks are doing to us and how they interact with religion, ideology and mass culture, as well as ethics, politics and aesthetics.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Tyne after Tyne

      An Environmental History of a River’s Battle for Protection 1529–2015

      by Leona J. Skelton

      Over the last five centuries, North-East England’s River Tyne went largely with the flow as it rode with us on a rollercoaster from technologically limited early modern oligarchy, to large-scale Victorian ‘improvement’, to twentieth-century deoxygenation and twenty-first-century efforts to expand biodiversity. Studying five centuries of Tyne conservatorship reveals that 1855 to 1972 was a blip on the graph of environmental concern, preceded and followed by more sustainable engagement and a fairer negotiation with the river’s forces and expressions as a whole and natural system, albeit driven by different motivations. Even during this blip, however, several organisations, tried to protect the river’s environmental health from harm. This Tyne study offers a template for a future body of work on British rivers that dislodges the Thames as the river of choice in British environmental history. And it undermines traditional approaches to rivers as passive backdrops of human activities. Departing from narratives that equated change with improvement, or with loss and destruction, it moves away from morally loaded notions of better or worse, and even dead, rivers. The book fully situates the Tyne’s fluvial transformations within political, economic, cultural, social and intellectual contexts. With such a long view, we can objectify ourselves through our descendants’ eyes, reconnecting us not only to our past, but also to our future. Let us sit with the Tyne itself, some of its salmon, a seventeenth-century Tyne River Court Juror, some nineteenth-century Tyne Improvement Commissioners, a 1920s biologist, a twentieth-century Tyne angler, shipbuilder and council planner and some twenty-first-century Tyne Rivers Trust volunteers. Where would they agree and disagree? How would they explain their conceptualisation of what the river is for and how it should be used and regulated? This book takes you to the heart of such virtual debates to revive, reconnect and reinvigorate the severed bonds and flows linking riparian places, issues and people across five centuries.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2016

      THE ECLIPSE OF URBANISM AND THE GREENING OF PUBLIC SPACE.

      Image Making and the Search for a Commons in the United States, 1682–1865

      by Mark Luccarelli

      In The Eclipse of Urbanism and the Greening of Public Space: Image Making and the Search for a Commons in the United States, 1682–1865, Mark Luccarelli pushes past unproductive mind/body debates by rooting the rise of environmental awareness in the political and geographical history of the US. Considering history in terms of the categorical development of space – social, territorial and conceptual – the book examines the forces that drove people to ignore their surroundings by distancing culture from place and by assiduously advancing the dissolution of social bonds. Thus beneath the question of the surround, and the key to its renewal today, is the quest to re-engage the common. The latter is still a part of the approach to space, its arrangement and disposition, and has a necessary environmental dimension. Concepts of urbanism, place identity, picturesque landscape and nature are part of a larger Western intellectual and cultural context but, by examining the imaging of cities and landscape, Luccarelli links particular American geographic settings – as well as the political ideals and practices of the republic – to the application and aesthetic reading of these ideas. The advocates of these various perspectives shared an aesthetic orientation as a means of redefining or recovering the common. The book looks at various American urban and regional contexts, as well as the work of artists, writers and public figures, including painter and engraver William Birch, Thomas Jefferson, engraver John Hill, Henry David Thoreau and Frederick Law Olmsted. Luccarelli embeds his environmental study in the works of these men and in the course of American history between the planting of the city of Philadelphia and the establishment of Olmsted’s major urban parks.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus

      The True Life and Trials of Nicholas of Myra

      by Adam C. English

      With his rosy cheeks and matching red suit—and ever-present elf and reindeer companions—Santa Claus may be the most identifiable of fantastical characters. But what do we really know of jolly old Saint Nicholas, "patron saint" of Christmastime? Ask about the human behind the suit, and the tale we know so well quickly fades into myth and folklore.In The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus, religious historian Adam English tells the true and compelling tale of Saint Nicholas, bishop of Myra. Around the fourth century in what is now Turkey, a boy of humble circumstance became a man revered for his many virtues. Chief among them was dealing generously with his possessions, once lifting an entire family out of poverty with a single--and secret--gift of gold, so legend tells. Yet he was much more than virtuous. As English reveals, Saint Nicholas was of integral influence in events that would significantly impact the history and development of the Christian church, including the Council of Nicaea, the destruction of the temple to Artemis in Myra, and a miraculous rescue of three falsely accused military officers. And Nicholas became the patron saint of children and sailors, merchants and thieves, as well as France, Russia, Greece, and myriad others.Weaving together the best historical and archaeological evidence available with the folklore and legends handed down through generations, English creates a stunning image of this much venerated Christian saint. With prose as enjoyable as it is informative, he shows why the life--and death--of Nicholas of Myra so radically influenced the formation of Western history and Christian thought, and did so in ways many have never realized. ; 1. Finding St. Nicholas2. Out of a Dying World Comes a Light3. Three Gifts and One Election4. The Work of Victory5. Riots, Beheadings, and Other Near Misfortunes6. Death Is Only the BeginningNotesRecommended ReadingsIndex

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2014

      Seriously Dangerous Religion

      What the Old Testament Really Says and Why It Matters

      by Iain Provan

      The Old Testament is often maligned as an outmoded and even dangerous text. Best-selling authors like Richard Dawkins, Karen Armstrong, and Derrick Jensen are prime examples of those who find the Old Testament to be problematic to modern sensibilities. Iain Provan counters that such easy and popular readings misunderstand the Old Testament. He opposes modern misconceptions of the Old Testament by addressing ten fundamental questions that the biblical text should--and according to Provan does--answer: questions such as "Who is God?" and "Why do evil and suffering mark the world?" By focusing on Genesis and drawing on other Old Testament and extra-biblical sources, Seriously Dangerous Religion constructs a more plausible reading. As it turns out, Provan argues, the Old Testament is far more dangerous than modern critics even suppose. Its dangers are the bold claims it makes upon its readers. ; 1 Of Mice, and Men, and HobbitsStories, Art, and Life2 The Up Quark, the Down Quark, and Other Cool Stuff What Is the World?3 Slow to Anger, Abounding in Love, and (Thankfully) Jealous Who Is God?4 Of Humus and Humanity Who Are Man and Woman?5 It Isn't Natural Why Do Evil and Suffering Mark the World?6 On Living in a Blighted World What Am I to Do about Evil and Suffering?7 Even the Stork Knows That How Am I to Relate to God?8 Love All, Trust a Few, Do Wrong to None How Am I to Relate to My Neighbor?9 On Keeping the Earth How Am I to Relate to the Rest of Creation?10 I Saw the New Jerusalem Which Society Should I Be Helping to Build?11 A Bird Perched in the Soul What Am I to Hope For?12 Further Up and Further In New Dimensions in the Old Story13 On the Judicious Closing of the Mind The Question of Truth14 Risk Assessment Is the Story Dangerous?Postscript: Biblical Faith for a New AgeNotesBibliographyScripture IndexIndex of AuthorsSubject Index

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2016

      Reading Backwards

      Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness

      by Richard B. Hays

      In Reading Backwards Richard B. Hays maps the shocking ways the four Gospel writers interpreted Israel's Scripture to craft their literary witnesses to the Church's one Christ. The Gospels' scriptural imagination discovered inside the long tradition of a resilient Jewish monotheism a novel and revolutionary Christology.Modernity's incredulity toward the Christian faith partly rests upon the characterization of early Christian preaching as a tendentious misreading of the Hebrew Scriptures. Christianity, modernity claims, twisted the Bible they inherited to fit its message about a mythological divine Savior. The Gospels, for many modern critics, are thus more about Christian doctrine in the second and third century than they are about Jesus in the first.Such Christian "misreadings" are not late or politically motivated developments within Christian thought. As Hays demonstrates, the claim that the events of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection took place "according to the Scriptures" stands at the very heart of the New Testament's earliest message. All four canonical Gospels declare that the Torah and the Prophets and the Psalms mysteriously prefigure Jesus. The author of the Fourth Gospel puts the claim succinctly: "If you believed Moses, you would believe me, for he wrote about me" (John 5:46).Hays thus traces the reading strategies the Gospel writers employ to "read backwards" and to discover how the Old Testament figuratively discloses the astonishing paradoxical truth about Jesus' identity. Attention to Jewish and Old Testament roots of the Gospel narratives reveals that each of the four Evangelists, in their diverse portrayals, identify Jesus as the embodiment of the God of Israel. Hays also explores the hermeneutical challenges posed by attempting to follow the Evangelists as readers of Israel's Scripture—can the Evangelists teach us to read backwards along with them and to discern the same mystery they discovered in Israel's story?In Reading Backwards Hays demonstrates that it was Israel's Scripture itself that taught the Gospel writers how to understand Jesus as the embodied presence of God, that this conversion of imagination occurred early in the development of Christian theology, and that the Gospel writers' revisionary figural readings of their Bible stand at the very center of Christianity. ; Introduction1. "The Manger in Which Christ Lies": Figural Readings of Israel’s ScriptureThe Fourfold Witness2. Figuring the Mystery: Reading Scripture with Mark3. Torah Transfigured: Reading Scripture with Matthew4. The One Who Redeems Israel: Reading Scripture with Luke5. The Temple Transfigured: Reading Scripture with JohnConclusion6. Retrospective Reading: The Challenges of Gospel-Shaped Hermeneutics

    • Humanities & Social Sciences

      Light in the Darkness

      Four Christian Apologists

      by Jon Elsby

      Christian apologetics is an important area of intellectual endeavour and achievement, standing at the boundaries between theology, philosophy and literature. Yet it has been largely neglected by historians of literature and ideas. In these essays, the author attempts to establish apologetics as a subject deserving of respect in its own right. He analyses the apologetic arguments and strategies of four of the greatest Christian apologists of the twentieth century – Hilaire Belloc, G. K. Chesterton, Dorothy L. Sayers, and C. S. Lewis. He shows how different lines of argument support each other and converge on the same conclusion: that what Chesterton called ‘orthodoxy’ and Lewis ‘mere Christianity’ represents the fundamental truth about the relations between human beings, the universe, and God.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2017

      Orthodoxy

      With an Introduction by Jon Elsby

      by G. K. Chesterton

      G. K. Chesterton wrote of Orthodoxy that it represented an attempt ‘to state the philosophy in which I have come to believe’ and to do so ‘in a vague and personal way, in a set of mental pictures rather than in a series of deductions’. For most of its readers, it is the wittiest and most rollicking defence of the Christian faith ever written. Anticipating much modern theology, Catholic and Protestant, Chesterton’s apologia is more personalistic than propositional. He understands that, in order to be credible, a belief system must appeal to the heart as well as to the mind. No one has set out more engagingly the reasons for believing in Christianity as the timeless truth about who we are, and rejecting the alternatives as fads and fashions. Jon Elsby, author of Light in the Darkness and Wrestling With the Angel, has written extensively on Christian apologists and apologetics, and has penned an illuminating introduction for this edition of Orthodoxy, which also contains brief notes and an index.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2014

      The Burghers of Ceylon

      Race, Representation, Identity

      by Andrew Elsby

      The Burghers of Ceylon traces the origins and history of the mixed-race populations of imperial Ceylon. It explains how, and why, those populations emerged, how they developed, how they were distinguished – and how they distinguished themselves – from the Europeans and from the native populations. It explores the components of burgher identity. The author also provides answers to the following questions. How reliable is the evidence of the Dutch Burgher Union’s genealogies? How prevalent is racial misrepresentation, and what were the motives behind it? How were the mixed-race populations treated by the European colonial powers? What happened to those mixed-race populations when colonial rule ended in 1948? The author’s interest in the burghers of Ceylon came about after his mother’s death, when he discovered she was from a Dutch burgher family in Ceylon. Her mother was half English and half native, and her father, Raoul Frank, was a Dutch burgher descended from a long line of German, French, Dutch, Belgian and British European male ancestors, with native or mixed-race female ancestors from the Dutch and British periods in Ceylon.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2015

      Wrestling With the Angel

      A Convert's Tale

      by Jon Elsby

      Who am I? Am I an autonomous being, able to define myself by my own free choices, or a created being with a given human nature, living in a world which, in significant respects, does not depend on me? Are these two views necessarily opposed? Wrestling With the Angel is one man’s attempt to answer those questions. Raised as a Protestant, the author lost his faith in his teenage years, and then gradually regained it – but in an unexpected form. This is the story of a spiritual and intellectual journey from Protestantism to atheism, and beyond: a journey which finally, and much to the author’s surprise, reached its terminus in the Catholic Church.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences

      What Does This Look Like In The Classroom?

      Bridging The Gap Between Research And Practice

      by Carl Hendrick (Author, Editor), Robin Macpherson (Author, Editor), Oliver Caviglioli (Illustrator)

      Educators around the world are uniting behind the need for the profession to have access to more high-quality research and evidence to do their job more effectively. But every year thousands of research papers are published, some of which contradict each other. How can busy teachers know which research is worth investing time in reading and understanding? And how easily is that academic research translated into excellent practice in the classroom? In this thorough, enlightening and comprehensive book, Carl Hendrick and Robin Macpherson ask 18 of today's leading educational thinkers to distill the most up-to-date research into effective classroom practice in 10 of the most important areas of teaching. The result is a fascinating manual that will benefit every single teacher in every single school, in all four corners of the globe. Contributors: Assessment, marking & feedback: Dylan Wiliam & Daisy Christodoulou; Behaviour: Tom Bennett & Jill Berry; Classroom talk and questioning: Martin Robinson & Doug Lemov; Learning myths: David Didau & Pedro de Bruyckere; Motivation: Nick Rose & Lucy Crehan; Psychology and memory: Paul Kirschner & Yana Weinstein; SEN: Jarlath O Brien & Maggie Snowling; Technology: Jose Picardo & Neelam Parmar; Reading and literacy: Alex Quigley & Dianne Murphy

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