• Business & management
      July 2015

      What Did Jesus Drive: Crisis PR in Cars, Computers and Christianity

      by Jason H. Vines

      Isn’t it time that we are told the insider TRUTH regarding the intentional and unintentional cover-ups made by the big boys in “Detroit.” An industry, the Auto Industry, driven by profits-over-principle according to many of its critics. Be prepared to buckle-up and enjoy this ride! This book is the first tell it like it is, of its kind! Why is it so difficult to tell the truth? Jason Vines starts this book with a simple question: why is it so difficult to tell the truth? Sadly, spoiler alert, he ends it with the same question. From Richard Nixon to Bill Clinton to Lance Armstrong to the IRS to Brian Williams to Bill Cosby to Tiger Woods and the NFL; why is it so painfully difficult? Vines cautions the reader up-front: “Relax, this is not a book about Jesus. However, he does appear in two chapters: first as a Hispanic grandfather from Waterford, Michigan, and later as the real Prince of Peace. No, this is a book about my life in the public relations blast furnace in the automotive industry; a quickly-derailed attempt to help a friend rebuild Detroit’s tattered image, thwarted by the sex, lies and corruption of former Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick; and, finally, trying to avoid another crisis with the number one selling book of all time. No, not Harry Potter; the Bible.” The crises Vines helped navigate through made headlines the world over: Jeep vehicles accused of deadly sudden unintended acceleration, Nissan’s near-death experience until it regained its MOJO, the Ford/Firestone tire mega-debacle, a jihad against SUVs by the “What Would Jesus Drive?” nuts, Detroit Mayor Kilpatrick’s drive to prison and finally avoiding a boycott of the most popular Bible in the world by evangelical Christian leaders. In his final chapter, titled “Government Motors on Fire”, Vines tackles the fake Chevy Volt fire crisis and General Motors’ 2014 nightmare with its faulty ignition switches that led to at least 24 deaths – and counting, and may lead to criminal indictments. Vines shares lessons learned and mistakes made. He notes that if he can impart anything in this book, it is the guiding principles he believes useful for any organization (not just the auto industry) or individual to avoid, mitigate or survive the inevitable crisis. As he puts it: “If you think you are immune to a crisis, you’ve already failed an overarching guiding principle.”

    • History
      November 2015

      Jimmy Hoffa Called My Mom A Bitch: Profiles in Stupidity

      by Jason H. Vines

      The book is broken up into various chapters of stupidity: Stupid Democrats, Stupid Republicans, Stupid Atheists, Stupid Christians, Stupid Criminals, Stupid Policies, Stupid People and so on. The “Stupid Criminals” chapter contains one of my favorite columns that appeared on the Detroit News’ political website. The June 29, 2010 column is titled “Globe Al Warming Gets Rubbed the Wrong Way,” and it takes on allegations that the former VP got inappropriately horny with female masseuse at a Portland, Oregon hotel. That column also continues the sick, yet hilarious saga of Otis “Masturgate” Mathis, the illiterate (no kidding), former head of Detroit Public Schools who was forced out after he admittedly fondled himself in front of numerous female superintendents. No, I am not making this up. I coined the scandal “Masturgate” and it soon became the rage in Detroit media and made my column one of the most popular on the site.

    • History of engineering & technology
      December 2013

      The Contractors

      The Story of British Civil Engineering Contractors

      by Hugh Ferguson , Mike Chimes (Author)

      Fully illustrated in colour, The Contractors, is the first history of the challenges and adventures faced by British civil engineering contractors from their emergence with canal construction in the late-eighteenth century to the present day. Extraordinarily ambitious, largely unrecognised men who built the world’s infrastructure – its roads and railways, canals and bridges, docks and harbours, lighthouses and breakwaters, sea works and flood defences, water supply and irrigation, urban drainage and sewerage, gas works and power stations, and buildings of all shapes and sizes – these contractors took considerable risks, many failed in the process but others thrived and developed into some of the most powerful and influential industrialists of their day. Including profiles of many of the key figures and organisations in the industry through the ages, The Contractors explains what the business is about and where it comes from, sharing with a wider audience the exploits of these adventurers, haracterised by their inspiring leadership, sheer hard work, a strong constitution and perseverance in the face of adversity. Over time, the contractor has changed: from the great Victorian contractors, towering men whose business was their personal affair, through the twentieth century which has seen the rise of the corporate contractor, specialist contractors and the blurring of the distinction between consulting engineers and contractors, to the larger firms of recent years becoming larger through merger and acquisition but, as the examples in this book demonstrate, there is still room for the entrepreneur with vision, leadership and drive to become a highly successful contractor. The Contractors is a compulsory read for all those working in the industry, including civil engineers, those interested in the industry and its impact on the world, and the wider public. Readers will experience the boom of the canal and railway eras, working at home and abroad, the difficulties and opportunities brought by wars, the equipment used and the specialists and sub-contractors of today, fully illustrated with unique material from ICE and the firms themselves. Following the success of The Civil Engineers, Hugh Ferguson BSc(Eng) CEng FICE MCIHT and Mike Chrimes MBE BA MLS MCLIP bring their extensive experience and unique insight and passion to civil engineering contractors.

    • History of engineering & technology
      August 2014

      Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers in Great Britain and Ireland - Volume 3: 1890-1920

      by R. C. Mcwilliam (Author)

      The third volume of the authoritative source of information on the engineers who designed public works over the past 300 years. Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers in Great Britain and Ireland discusses the lives of the people who were concerned with awe-inspiring engineering feats between the years 1891-1920 including building harbours and lighthouses, fen drainage and improving river navigations, building canals, roads, bridges and early railways, and providing water supply facilities. This book is the definitive biographical reference work on the lives, works and careers of individuals engaged in the practice of civil engineering. Richly illustrated, this book is an engaging read for any engineer and also provides great value to engineers involved in restoration work.

    • Air forces & warfare

      Bloody Shambles.

      by Christopher F. Shores

    • History of engineering & technology

      The Origins of the Lms in South Wales

      by Gwyn. Briwnant-Jones

    • General & world history

      Dust Clouds in the Middle East

      The Air War for East Africa, Iraq, Syria, Iran and Madagascar, 1940-42

      by Christopher Shores

      Originally appearing as a series of magazine articles, the valuable research into air operations, over the old-style Middle East of World War II, here appears in book form.;It deals with a variety of engagements between Britain and her Commonwealth forces and the Germans, Italians and Vichy French across many borders and differing terrains. It covers from the Italian threat and Ababa, the air battles over Lebanon, the breaking of Vichy air strength and culminates in the occupation of Madagascar in 1942.

    • History of engineering & technology

      The Jg 26 War Diary

      by Donald L. Caldwell

      Jagdgeschwader 26 was one of only two German units to remain on the Western front for the entire war. Its rise and fall mirrors the history of the German Air Force. This book gives a chronology of the unit's activities, using documentary sources, JG 26 archives and veteran's own stories.;Volume one covers the period from 1939 to 1942 and contains interviews with the veterans of the JG23 unit, Allied records, radio intelligence, national archives of Germany, the UK and USAF Historical Research Agency and post-war research, to provide a daily account of the unit's activities - as only two of the 30 volumes of the unit's official diary survived the war.

    • Biography: general

      The Jg 26 War Diary.

      by Donald L. Caldwell

      This is volume two of a comprehensive history of the German World War II Jagdgeschwader 26 (JG26) unit. Volume two takes the JG26 from the beginning of 1943, when the American 8th Air Force first began to make its presence felt over occupied Europe, until the end of the war. During this period the Luftwaffe, with its JG26, began an inexorable decline, though the men of the JG26 unit continued to score successes over Normandy, Arnhem and the Ardennes. This book contains interviews with these men and provides a daily account of the wing's activities, using Allied records, radio intelligence, and post-war research, as only two of the 30 volumes of the unit's official diary survived the war.;The book is based largely on primary documentation obtained from the unit's veterans and on material from the national archives of Germany and the UK and USAF Historical Research Agency. The volume provides information such as JG26 casualties, Allied victories, JG26 aerial victories and Allied victims.

    • History of engineering & technology

      Trail of Gold & Silver

      Mining in Colorado, 1859-2009

      by Duane A Smith

      Historian Duane A Smith details Colorado's mining saga -- a story that stretches from the beginning of the gold and silver mining rush in the mid-nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. Gold and silver mining laid the foundation for Colorado's economy, and 1859 marked the beginning of a fever for these precious metals. Mining changed the state and its people forever, affecting settlement, territorial status, statehood, publicity, development, investment, economy, jobs both in and outside the industry, transportation, tourism, advances in mining and smelting technology, and urbanisation. Moreover, the first generation of Colorado mining brought a fascinating collection of people and a new era to the region. Written in a lively manner by one of Colorado's pre-eminent historians, this book honours the 2009 sesquicentennial of Colorado's gold rush. Smith's narrative will appeal to anybody with an interest in the state's fascinating mining history over the past 150 years.

    • History of engineering & technology
      February 2016

      From Colonies to Countries in the North Caribbean

      Military Engineers in the Development of Cities and Territories

      by Editor(s): Pedro Luengo-Gutiérrez, Gene Allen Smith

      This volume brings together eight essays that address the result of a research project involving a group of international scholars. It explores a little-discussed, yet interesting phenomenon in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico region – how military engineers reshaped the physical landscape for imperial reasons and, in doing so, laid the foundations for broader colonial development. Moreover, this transnational scenario reveals how military construction reached beyond cross-borders themes and histories from the age of imperialism. As such, this book provides valuable insights into the role of military engineers in the process of articulating new American countries from the late 18th to 19th century. While this time period is full of international and local conflicts, it remains essential for understanding the region’s history – from the Gulf of Mexico to the Caribbean Sea – and even its current situation. Due to independence movements and Spain’s Decree of Free Trade (1778), the region’s connection with Europe changed dramatically. This affected the entire American continent, but had a particularly peculiar in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. For this reason, this volume underlines the key role of military engineers on other fields, from railroad design to environmental intervention, through cartographical works, and in diplomacy, all the while overcoming the traditional perspective of military engineers as being only builders of structures for war.

    • History of engineering & technology
      February 2016

      From Colonies to Countries in the North Caribbean

      Military Engineers in the Development of Cities and Territories

      by Editor(s): Pedro Luengo-Gutiérrez, Gene Allen Smith

      This volume brings together eight essays that address the result of a research project involving a group of international scholars. It explores a little-discussed, yet interesting phenomenon in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico region – how military engineers reshaped the physical landscape for imperial reasons and, in doing so, laid the foundations for broader colonial development. Moreover, this transnational scenario reveals how military construction reached beyond cross-borders themes and histories from the age of imperialism. As such, this book provides valuable insights into the role of military engineers in the process of articulating new American countries from the late 18th to 19th century. While this time period is full of international and local conflicts, it remains essential for understanding the region’s history – from the Gulf of Mexico to the Caribbean Sea – and even its current situation. Due to independence movements and Spain’s Decree of Free Trade (1778), the region’s connection with Europe changed dramatically. This affected the entire American continent, but had a particularly peculiar in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. For this reason, this volume underlines the key role of military engineers on other fields, from railroad design to environmental intervention, through cartographical works, and in diplomacy, all the while overcoming the traditional perspective of military engineers as being only builders of structures for war.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      July 2010

      Technology and Organization

      Essays in Honour of Joan Woodward

      by Nelson X. Phillips, Dorothy Griffiths, Graham Sewell, Michael Lounsbury

      It is now 35 years since the death of Professor Joan Woodward, one of the founding figures of organization studies. Professor Woodward died in 1971 at the age of 54 after a relatively brief but highly distinguished career as a management researcher and teacher, and just six years after the publication of her landmark book "Industrial Organization". At the time of her death, Professor Woodward was the Chair in Industrial Sociology at Imperial College London, having been elected as only the second women professor at the College in 1970. She joined the Production Engineering and Management Section of Imperial in 1958 and the majority of her most important work was published during this period. Prior to this she had spent a number of years at the South East Essex College of Technology where she conducted much of the empirical work that informed her significant contributions to the field.

    • Technology, Engineering & Agriculture
      July 2001

      New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium

      by W. During, Ray Oakey, Saleema Kauser

      This tenth volume of papers emanating from the annual International High Technology Small Firms Conference represents a full decade of research and policy relevant papers on innovation and growth problems of New Technology-based Firms (NTBf). Because this series has become the major vehicle for publication among the best international researchers working on the formation and subsequent growth problems of NTBfs, it represents an authoritative voice on NTBf development problems. Topics covered in this volume include strategy, spin offs - their contribution to NTBf growth and the problems they encounter during the traumatic spin off process, the current hot topic of clusters and their role in enhancing NTBf formation and growth, networking and global issues since many NTBfs are truly born global.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      November 2018

      Lime Kilns

      History and Heritage

      by David Johnson

      For centuries lime was an essential ingredient in many aspects of life and work - such as farming, building and manufacturing - and the kilns in which lime was produced were a familiar sight across the country, not just in areas where limestone naturally occurred. The importance given to the industry is illustrated by the number of painters, notably Turner and Girtin, who chose to paint lime kilns either as the main focus or as an incidental element, and by the number of literary figures who brought lime burning into their novels. Lime Kilns: History and Heritage starts by discussing the uses and importance of lime, and how it has been portrayed artistically, then describes how lime kilns changed over time, from simple clamp kilns through small farmers' and estate field kilns to large commercially operated kilns. It is illustrated with contemporary and modern photographs, paintings and plans drawing on examples from across Britain. David Johnson has published and lectured widely on lime burning and is regarded as an authority on the subject.

    • Technology, Engineering & Agriculture
      March 2019

      Britain's Greatest Bridges

      by Joseph Rogers

      Throughout history, the need to cross the changing British landscape has always driven innovation. Natural valleys, rivers and mountainous features required the construction of bridges in ancient times to expand our horizons, transport goods and, ultimately, conquer all corners of our island nation. Since then, with the development of technology, bridges have become not only practical structures for people and their possessions, but also prominent icons of our railway network, our reliance on motor vehicles and a desire to connect the country's settlements and communities with one another. Today, Britain has bridges spanning not only many of its rivers, but much of its history. Each age brought new designs and engineering prowess, celebrated most proudly during the Industrial Revolution. This book admires some of the best, from the world-renowned to the minor and the modest.

    • Science & Mathematics
      July 2019

      Mineral Building Traditions in the Himalayas

      The Mineralogical Impact on the Use of Clay as Building Material

      by Hubert Feiglstorfer

      Mineral building materials and regionally related methods of processing are an essential part of building culture throughout the Himalayas. Based on transregional knowledge transfer, raw materials have been able to find an ecologically and economically optimised destiny in particular local applications. For this study, samples were collected as raw material or originated from certain building components. Samples were analysed according to their material properties and architectural application. Traditional building techniques were examined and their correlation with traceable material qualities studied. Clay-specific properties such as colour, grain size distribution, grain shape, hardness, plasticity, organic additives, or bulk and clay mineral properties were used as comparative parameters. This study gives fresh insight into the interaction between technical requirements, environmental resources and material implementation. It is the first scientific approach in studying the Himalayan earthen heritage in a wide scope and connecting material research and cultural heritage from various perspectives - in particular archaeology, architecture, research on materials and building techniques.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2020

      Building the French empire, 1600–1800

      Colonialism and material culture

      by Benjamin Steiner, Alan Lester

      This study explores the shared history of the French Empire from a perspective of material culture in order to re-evaluate the participation of colonial, creole and indigenous agency in the construction of imperial spaces. The decentered approach to a global history of the French colonial realm allows a new understanding of power relations in different locales. Traditional binary models that assume the centralisation of imperial power and control in an imperial center often overlook the variegated nature of agency in the empire. In a selection of case studies in the Caribbean, Canada, Africa and India, several building projects show the mixed group of planners, experts and workers, the composite nature of building materials and elements of different "glocal" styles that give the empire its concrete manifestation and contributed to the emergence of emotions as a means of forming communities and identities.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2020

      Building the French empire, 1600–1800

      Colonialism and material culture

      by Benjamin Steiner, Alan Lester

      This study explores the shared history of the French Empire from a perspective of material culture in order to re-evaluate the participation of colonial, creole and indigenous agency in the construction of imperial spaces. The decentered approach to a global history of the French colonial realm allows a new understanding of power relations in different locales. Traditional binary models that assume the centralisation of imperial power and control in an imperial center often overlook the variegated nature of agency in the empire. In a selection of case studies in the Caribbean, Canada, Africa and India, several building projects show the mixed group of planners, experts and workers, the composite nature of building materials and elements of different "glocal" styles that give the empire its concrete manifestation and contributed to the emergence of emotions as a means of forming communities and identities.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2020

      Building the French empire, 1600–1800

      Colonialism and material culture

      by Benjamin Steiner, Alan Lester

      This study explores the shared history of the French Empire from a perspective of material culture in order to re-evaluate the participation of colonial, creole and indigenous agency in the construction of imperial spaces. The decentered approach to a global history of the French colonial realm allows a new understanding of power relations in different locales. Traditional binary models that assume the centralisation of imperial power and control in an imperial center often overlook the variegated nature of agency in the empire. In a selection of case studies in the Caribbean, Canada, Africa and India, several building projects show the mixed group of planners, experts and workers, the composite nature of building materials and elements of different "glocal" styles that give the empire its concrete manifestation and contributed to the emergence of emotions as a means of forming communities and identities.

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