• Freemasonry & secret societies

      Emulation Working Today

      by G. F. Redman

    • Popular beliefs & controversial knowledge

      The Rosslyn Hoax?

      Viewing Rosslyn Chapel from a New Perspective

      by

      Subtitled, }Viewing Rosslyn Chapel From A New perspective{. Following the success of }The Da Vinci Code{, eminent Scottish Freemason, Robert Cooper, takes a look at the origin of Rosslyn Chapel. Exploring and exploding many myths, Cooper asks whether we, the public, have been the victims of a massive hoax and wonders whether the meaning of the Kirkwall Scroll has been hijacked for a particular purpose. And, ultimately, who benefits from trying to cover it all up?

    • Freemasonry & secret societies

      Turning the Templar Key

      Martyrs, Freemasons and the Secret of the True Cross of Christ

      by Robert Lomas

      This year sees the 700th anniversary of the destruction of the Knight Templar, and this book returns to the unanswered questions of Lomas's bestselling }The Hiram Key{. Were the Templars wiped out, or did they survive by starting new Orders to preserve their secrets? What happened to their legacy? Will be heavily promoted by extensive national and local media coverage, and feature in Masonic specialist publications.

    • Freemasonry & secret societies

      A Handbook for the Freemason's Wife

      by Philippa. Faulks

    • Freemasonry & secret societies

      The Secret Science of Masonic Initiation

      by Robert Lomas

    • Freemasonry & secret societies

      Emulation Ritual.

      by

    • Popular beliefs & controversial knowledge

      Turning the Hiram Key

      Making Darkness Visible

      by Robert Lomas

      In this ground-breaking book, the author describes his personal journey through the mystical rituals of Freemasonry. Drawing from personal spiritual insights hidden Masonic texts and modern scientific knowledge, he reveals why people join Freemasonry, what they expect to find and how they benefit. The book discloses the inner secrets of Freemasonry, which have hitherto been the preserve of a select few. In doing so, it provides a window into the world which has been shrouded in mystery and suspicion.

    • Freemasonry & secret societies

      Masonic Etiquette Today

      A Modern Guide to Masonic Protocol and Practice

      by G. F. Redman

    • Popular beliefs & controversial knowledge

      The Red Triangle

      A History of Anti-masonry

      by

    • Romance

      Vrij Worden

      by Jan Prins

      A resident of the Rosa Spier house in Laren takes us through various stages of life. It will be shown including aspects that were previously hidden from us, but they have a major impact on our daily lives, such as the Skull & Bones and Freemasonry. The book is a hybrid of the description of a part of the personal life of the author and a description of his quest for the Beautiful in all its forms. ---------------- Een bewoner van het Rosa Spier Huis in Laren voert ons door allerlei fasen van het leven. Er worden o.a. aspecten getoond die eerder voor ons verborgen waren, maar die van grote invloed zijn op ons leven van alledag, zoals die van de Skull & Bones en van de Vrijmetselarij. Het boek is een mengvorm van de beschrijving van een deel van het persoonlijke leven van de auteur en een beschrijving van zijn zoektocht naar het Schone in al zijn vormen.

    • Biography & True Stories
      March 2011

      Faithful Through Hard Times

      A WW2 True Story

      by Jean Gill

      WW2 military history, with extracts from a soldier's diary The true story of four years, 3 million bombs, one small island out-facing the might of the German and Italian airforces - and one young Scotsman who didn't want to be there. This is not a WW2 memoir. It is a riveting reconstruction from an eye-witness account written at the time in a secret diary, a diary too dangerous to show anyone and too precious to destroy.Young men died in wars and old men lied about what they'd done in them; George had no intention of doing either.Private George Taylor arrived on Malta in 1940 thinking that shiny buttons would earn him fast promotion; he left four years later, a cynical sergeant and a Master Mason who never said, 'I was there' without a bitter smile.Despite the times he said, 'It's me for the next boat', despite his fears that Nettie had forgotten him, George kept the motto of the Royal Army Medical Corps 'In arduis fidelis', 'faithful through hard times' - in public - and only told his diary the inside story of four long years.Sixty years later, the truth has to be told. Book trailer youtube.com/watch?v=WrOShZg44Ec

    • Interdisciplinary studies
      November 2014

      Social Networks in the Long Eighteenth Century

      Clubs, Literary Salons, Textual Coteries

      by Editor(s): Ileana Baird

      In an attempt to better account for the impressive diversity of positions and relations that characterizes the eighteenth-century world, this collection proposes a new methodological frame, one that is less hierarchical in approach and more focused, instead, on the nature of these interactions, on their Addisonian “usefulness,” declared goals, and (un)intended results. By shifting focus from a cultural-historicist approach to sociability to the rhizomatic nature of eighteenth-century associations, this collection approaches them through new methodological lenses that include social network analysis, assemblage and graph theory, social media and digital humanities scholarship. Imagining the eighteenth-century world as a networked community rather than a competing one reflects a recent interest in novel forms of social interaction facilitated by new social media—from Internet forums to various types of social networking sites—and also signals the increasing involvement of academic communities in digital humanities projects that use new technologies to map out patterns of intellectual exchange. As such, the articles included in this collection demonstrate the benefits of applying interdisciplinary approaches to eighteenth-century sociability, and their role in shedding new light on the way public opinion was formed and ideas disseminated during pre-modern times. The issues addressed by our contributors are of paramount importance for understanding the eighteenth-century culture of sociability. They address, among other things, clubbing practices and social networking strategies (political, cultural, gender-based) in the eighteenth-century world, the role of clubs and other associations in “improving” knowledge and behaviors, conflicting views on publicity, literary and political alliances and their importance for an emerging celebrity culture, the role of cross-national networks in launching pan-European and transatlantic trends, Romantic modes of sociability, as well as the contribution of voluntary associations (clubs, literary salons, communities of readers, etc.) to the formation of the public sphere. This collection demonstrates how relevant social networking strategies were to the context of the eighteenth-century world, and how similar they are to the congeries of new practices shaping the digital public sphere of today.

    • Interdisciplinary studies
      November 2014

      Social Networks in the Long Eighteenth Century

      Clubs, Literary Salons, Textual Coteries

      by Editor(s): Ileana Baird

      In an attempt to better account for the impressive diversity of positions and relations that characterizes the eighteenth-century world, this collection proposes a new methodological frame, one that is less hierarchical in approach and more focused, instead, on the nature of these interactions, on their Addisonian “usefulness,” declared goals, and (un)intended results. By shifting focus from a cultural-historicist approach to sociability to the rhizomatic nature of eighteenth-century associations, this collection approaches them through new methodological lenses that include social network analysis, assemblage and graph theory, social media and digital humanities scholarship. Imagining the eighteenth-century world as a networked community rather than a competing one reflects a recent interest in novel forms of social interaction facilitated by new social media—from Internet forums to various types of social networking sites—and also signals the increasing involvement of academic communities in digital humanities projects that use new technologies to map out patterns of intellectual exchange. As such, the articles included in this collection demonstrate the benefits of applying interdisciplinary approaches to eighteenth-century sociability, and their role in shedding new light on the way public opinion was formed and ideas disseminated during pre-modern times. The issues addressed by our contributors are of paramount importance for understanding the eighteenth-century culture of sociability. They address, among other things, clubbing practices and social networking strategies (political, cultural, gender-based) in the eighteenth-century world, the role of clubs and other associations in “improving” knowledge and behaviors, conflicting views on publicity, literary and political alliances and their importance for an emerging celebrity culture, the role of cross-national networks in launching pan-European and transatlantic trends, Romantic modes of sociability, as well as the contribution of voluntary associations (clubs, literary salons, communities of readers, etc.) to the formation of the public sphere. This collection demonstrates how relevant social networking strategies were to the context of the eighteenth-century world, and how similar they are to the congeries of new practices shaping the digital public sphere of today.

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