• Fiction
      April 2011

      White Lies

      by Lynn Michell

      "A debut novel which possesses and is possessed by a rare authority of voice… the mother’s voice that sings White Lies into unforgettability. Hers and Eve’s. Their thoughts and writing ring like music." — The Scotsman. About this book: First accepted for publication in hardback by Quartet Books. By 1950, Kenya was on the verge of one of the bloodiest wars of decolonisation fought in Britain’s twentieth century empire. Britain’s Gulag. Eve is dutifully typing her father’s dictated memoirs of his time as a soldier in WWII and in Nairobi during the Mau Mau uprising. With growing unease, she questions his account of what really happened in Kenya. A different story – of love and adultery – written by Eve’s mother, comes to light after her death. The two young sisters recount fragments of their time in Africa; their naive voices break into the adult deceptions. White Lies is about different kinds of war and different kinds of loving. It explores the fragility and partiality of memory and our need to re-write the past so that it does not jar with the stories we tell ourselves and others. About the author: Lynn Michell has published 13 books including an illustrated writing scheme for schools, a book about ME, and two books published by The Women’s Press.

    • Fiction
      April 2016

      Ring of Stones

      Portal to Another World

      by Alexander Lawes

      When Anna’s dirt bike pulled up alongside late one summer’s evening, Harry grasped the opportunity to escape the city and his troubles, but he never imagined the mysterious girl would lead him across the galaxy to another world. Transported via the Ring of Stones to a planet reflecting a visionary Earth, the friends embark on an intricate pursuit of the truth about what really happened to their missing parents, all the while struggling to remain one step ahead of the sinister Authorities.

    • Fiction
      September 2016

      An Instrument of War

      by Martin Hicks

      It is August 1863 and the Confederate Navy Cruiser Palmetto escapes from Charleston harbour to resume her career as a raider, hunting the shipping of the United States. The succeeding months see her range the Atlantic Ocean before facing a wild passage of Cape Horn, as her Captain Thomas Grover steers his ship for the Orient, seeking ever more victims in his mission to cripple the overseas commerce of the enemy. Martin Hicks lives in Fraserburgh in Aberdeenshire Scotland and began writing after a career in education. “An Instrument of War,” the sequel to “Palmetto,” is his tenth book, all of them set in the war of 1861-65. He is currently working on the third and final book of the “Palmetto” series. By the same author: A Gathering of Soldiers Hard Passage North The Rappahannock Line Mirage of Victory The Bitterest Enemy A Season for Killing A Deepening Twilight Bond of Blood Palmetto

    • Fiction
      January 2017

      Just Deserts

      Book 3 in the Hackers thriller series

      by L. J. Greatrex

      The extraordinary challenges facing our well-established character now known as ‘Bill Pascal’ are all too evident as William Forester seeks to remain invisible to the outside world. A chance encounter leaves him feeling vulnerable once more and he steps up his efforts to discredit and bankrupt the man he holds responsible for the years of struggle he has encountered. Notwithstanding the fortune he has amassed and the now comfortable lifestyle he has carved out, the ever-present doubt that his anonymity will be revealed forces him to take extreme measures to exert the just deserts he has waited so long for.

    • Fiction

      Gwilherm's Story

      by Irene Louis

      Gwilherm has witnessed the murder of his ex-mistress but cannot report it because of his murky past. He desperately needs money in order to disappear again and his attempts to claim his inheritance lead to heartbreak and disaster. Set in Brittany in the late 19th century, this book is the follow up to ‘Gabriele's Ghost’, a tale of murder, mystery and the adventures of two psychic girls who are on the trail of the villain responsible for the destruction of one family.

    • Fiction

      Gabriele's Ghost

      by Irene Louis

      Mid 19th Century Brittany: Gabriele and Brigitte, separated by their stations in life, are fated to come together when Gabriele’s ghost urges Brigitte to uncover who killed her. Gabriele joins with Brigitte at the graveside. Brigitte suffers strange symptoms before Maela explains to her what has happened because Gabriele’s apparently natural death concealed her murder. They discover that there have been more murders and one murderous attempt on Gabriele’s brother, Elouan who survives an apparently accidental fall and his subsequent enslavement by pirates. A lowly maid in a rich household, Brigitte finds her life is threatened when she joins forces with Gabriele’s family and together they work to thwart the murderer.

    • Fiction
      January 2011

      True Warriors

      by Ken Kamoche

      Life under dictatorship, Moi, Nairobi, Kenya, London, Britain, political witch-hunting, poaching, ivory trade, financial scandals, studying abroad, interracial relationships, love triangle, land conflicts, Mau mau, freedom fighters, postcolonial Kenya, corruption, searching for identity, finding oneself.

    • Fiction
      January 2012

      Skimmin' Stones

      by Nicholas P. Murray

      A multilayered book that shocks, saddens, invigorates, and definitely entertains. Irish literature. Coming-of-age. Adolescent adventure. Teacher-student relations. First kiss. Dublin. London. Dysfunctional family. Love triangle. Pope. Most wanted man.

    • Fiction
      January 2013

      Black Ghosts

      by Ken Kamoche

      Dan Chiponda earns a scholarship to study in China and reluctantly leaves his native Zimbabwe for an uncertain future. Learning to take racial abuse in his stride, he dates a fellow student, Lai Ying, who is attracted to his easygoing manner. He remains haunted by the weight of his mother’s expectations, encapsulated by the image of the African fish eagle. Things take a dramatic turn when Chinese students pour into the streets in an orgy of violence to drive Africans out of town. The situation in Nanjing only stabilises when attention turns to the mayhem that is unraveling in Tiananmen Square, Beijing. But that is only the beginning of Dan’s troubles with the ‘Campus Gestapo’, loan sharks in Hong Kong, and the shock of his family getting caught up in the violence by Mugabe’s war vets.

    • Fiction
      January 2003

      The Wind In The Pylons Vol 1

      The Adventures Of The Mole In Weaselworld

      by Gareth Lovett Jones

      Environmental satire: When Mole (from Kenneth Grahame’s “The Wind In The Willows”) finds a tunnel behind the big old cupboard in his kitchen and goes exploring, little does he know the adventures in store. For the passage-way turns out to be a time tunnel that eventually brings him out in the mid 1990’s – a strange world in which his beloved valley has been devastated by hulking shed-like shopping zones and most of the animals seem to be trapped inside flotillas of bizarrely-shaped contraptions moving at nightmare speeds along a network of titanic roads. He meets descendants or look-alikes of his old chums, all involved in business, politics and such like. But the time tunnel has unaccountably invested in him a magical skill: whomever he is near is unable to resist telling him the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. A biting satire on modern Britain, by turns scathing and heart-rending, The Wind In The Pylons captures its essence, seen through the eyes of an innocent abroad. The author, with sharp eye and cutting wit, holds a mirror up to “the way we live today”: compared with Kenneth Grahame’s bucolic view of life at the turn of the last century, it is not a pretty sight.

    • Fiction
      January 2004

      The Wind In The Pylons Vol 2

      The Continuing Adventures Of The Mole In Weaselworld

      by Gareth Lovett Jones

      Environmental satire (Vol. 2): In this volume, we follow Mole’s further adventures as he searches for the England he remembers, and the encounter with global capitalism which precedes the touching denouement of his story. Few targets escape the author’s scathing eye in this ingenious novel, be they New Right politicians, modern planners, intensive farmers, or the architects of world trade. The Wind In The Pylons will have you chortling with laughter even as you are crying at the shame of it all.

    • Fiction
      January 2001

      Libidan

      by PJ Goddard

      Libidan is the first black comedy of the biotechnological age. At its heart lies the defining ethical question of the genomic revolution - when scientists can manipulate at will the body's every mechanism, what will human life become? Bill Kennedy develops medicines for rare hormonal disorders. His life at the Research and Development Centre at Asper Pharmaceuticals is completely uneventful - until the freak laboratory accident that turns his humdrum world on its head. Libidan. A psycho-sexual stimulant of awesome potency. A once-in-a-lifetime discovery to make him wealthy beyond his wildest dreams ... if only he can find a way to perfect the formula. And so begins his journey: a journey into the emergent sciences of the new millennium where synthetic designer drugs meet genetic engineering; a journey of exquisite physical ecstacies and chilling new moralities. A journey that eventually leads to the one man with the power to disassemble and reconstruct human life itself.

    • Fiction
      January 2005

      Criminal

      by PJ Goddard

      Crime thriller. England 2005: a new millennium has dawned, yet the nation’s laws, institutions and values interact to serve the interests of the wealthy and the powerful to an extent unseen since the Middle Ages. At the heart of this system lies the media – a new medieval church furnishing an unenlightened populace with icons that they may slavishly worship, infidels that they may jingoistically despise and a litany of beliefs that they may comfortingly intone, but which only serve to perpetuate their political and intellectual serfdom. Into this modern age steps a forgotten man from history: Miles Coverdale, the 16th century preacher and biblical translator who fought in the vanguard of the English Reformation. Guided by characters and signs from the Book of Revelation, Coverdale sets out once again on the long and dangerous path to his divinely-ordained destiny: to discover the truth and make it known to the people of these islands in their own language. Mixing history, crime-thriller and biblical apocalypse, ‘Criminal’ offers a searing indictment of the British establishment and the moral and cultural perspectives it propagates for its self-advancement.

    • Fiction
      October 2013

      Sailing Through Byzantium

      by Maureen Freely

      About this book: Maureen Freely’s latest novel plunges us into the darkness of the Cuban Missile Crisis seen through the eyes of Mimi, a young girl with an overactive imagination. The heady bohemian atmosphere of Istanbul's ex-pat society provides a rich backdrop. Maureen Freely has recently been made President of English PEN. It’s one minute to midnight on 27th October 1962. The Cuban missile crisis is entering its final countdown as the world prepares for nuclear winter. But in Istanbul’s old bohemian quarter, a confederacy of free spirits has gathered around a baby grand to see the night out in style. The moment is captured in a legendary photograph. Behind them, dark ships pass along the Bosphorus. Some could be Soviet tankers, smuggling missiles to Cuba, but tonight no one is looking. All eyes are on Grace, the dark-haired singer. All that matters is her sublime voice, and her song: Stormy Weather. The girl crouched beneath the piano is the discordant note in the flamboyant scene. This is Mimi, Grace’s nine-year old daughter. Until tonight she believed every word her mother uttered. Now she sees a byzantine web of lies. Who abandoned whom that night? And why did it change her life forever? On the 27th October 2012, Mimi has come back, haunted by these unanswered questions, to make her peace with the past. About the author: Maureen Freely is a renowned novelist, translator and activist. She was born in the US but grew up in Turkey. Educated at Radcliffe College, Harvard University, she has spent most of her adult life in England. She is perhaps best known for her translations of five books by the Turkish novelist and Nobel Laureate, Orhan Pamuk. She is a professor at the University of Warwick, and currently the chair of the Translators Association. She continues to be active in PEN and other crusading organizations. Sailing Through Byzantium is her seventh novel.

    • Fiction
      March 2015

      Dogwood

      by Lindsey Parnell

      “You’d think she was an angel if she wasn’t always flying so close to hell.” Released from prison on probation, 19-year-old Harper Haley returns to the brutal, sweaty, Dogwood scented landscape of her youth. Chronicling her homecoming and struggle for rehabilitation, this is the story of one girl’s sin, guilt and resurrection. At the heart of the novel is the dangerous, obsessive sisterhood between Harper and her childhood friends Collier, a seductively destructive debutante, and Caro, a jaded dreamer yearning for escape. As Harper backslides into a violent cycle of sex, drugs and abuse, the sisterhood at the core of her identity, and of the story, begins to unravel. Climaxing in the confession of the act that irreversibly altered her life and those closest to her, Dogwood is Harper’s story, the one she can’t forget and the one she cannot speak. About the author Lindsay Parnell was born on a marine base in Jacksonville and grew up in Charlottesville, Virginia. Her short fiction has appeared in 3AM Magazine, The Prague Review, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, The Fem and others. She owns 13 editions of The Bell Jar and shares a birthday with Meryl Streep. Dogwood is her first novel.

    • Fiction

      Love and Wine

      by Paula Marais

      Helen Middleton is a British artist, who travels to a little coastal town called Scarborough in South Africa to recover from an unpleasant divorce and several failed attempts to have a baby. Rather than focusing on tired post-apartheid clichés, this is a novel about the healing nature of an inspired natural environment as well as the search for a love that builds rather the breaks. Helen encounters two men, Max de Villiers – a writer and wealthy wine maker and his brother Jared – who runs the family vineyard of Bourgogne with him. Though she falls for one of them, is there more to him than meets the eye and is he really the right person to complete her?

    • Fiction
      December 2013

      Vengeance

      by John Morritt

      At the tender age of five, Peter Edwards witnesses the horrific death of his father by a drunk driver. Twenty years later, the nightmares that tortured him for a few years after the accident inexplicably return to haunt him, leading to the breakdown in his relationship with his girlfriend, Janet, and destroying his teaching career. After a particularly graphic nightmare one night, Peter vividly recalls the face of the killer. He is filled with anger so strong, that he becomes consumed with avenging his father’s death. Though many dream of revenge, they lack the courage to act. Not Peter Edwards. An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth he tells himself as he embarks on a terrifying trail of vengeance.

    • Fiction
      September 2018

      The Last Hit

      by John Morritt

      John Stone, former army sniper, mercenary turned hitman, is sick of killing. When contracted by a shadowy government figure to take down an ex-member of parliament, testifying in an arms scandal that would embarrass the government, Stone decides it would be his last assignment. However, notorious North London gangster, Alex Brant, makes him an offer too good to refuse. What he believes will be one last run-of-the-mill job, turns out to be anything but. Stone’s life becomes more complicated, after a chance meeting with investigative journalist, Andrew Ferguson, results in several attempts being made on his life. With the help of MI5 agent, Nikki Miles, and Alex Brant’s second in command, Kristina Kovac, Stone tries to work out who wants him dead and why. As he digs deeper, he realises his last two assignments are closely linked and why he is seen as a loose end. Stone struggles to understand who can be trusted and has to use all his skills to stay alive.

    • Fiction
      December 2015

      Dumb Love

      by Jeremy Orlando

      Nothing ever happens for the first time. No one is ever as smart as they think they are. And the shadow of Cutter Kane looms only over those trapped in the clutches of a lust for vengeance. Hamlyn Daniel is about to learn these truths… the hard way.

    • Fiction
      July 2014

      A Slight Case of Death

      by Jeremy Orlando

      ‘It was his reflection in the mirror that confirmed his altered state. He couldn’t locate his pulse. In the past it had never left home without him. He breathed into the palm of his hand. Futile. Raymond Coles’ next course of action was to panic.’ What would you do if you woke up dead? Who would you tell? Would there be a wall of regret waiting for you behind every opening door? These were the questions death threw at Raymond Cole that fateful night. What would his mother say? What about Mr Lee and his promotion at the town library? What had once looked like a waiting lifetime of possibility was gone, and it wasn’t hiding under the bed. Does anything matter in death?

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