• Fiction
      April 2011

      White Lies

      by Lynn Michell

      "A debut novel which possesses and is possessed by a rare authority of voice… the mother’s voice that sings White Lies into unforgettability. Hers and Eve’s. Their thoughts and writing ring like music." — The Scotsman. About this book: First accepted for publication in hardback by Quartet Books. By 1950, Kenya was on the verge of one of the bloodiest wars of decolonisation fought in Britain’s twentieth century empire. Britain’s Gulag. Eve is dutifully typing her father’s dictated memoirs of his time as a soldier in WWII and in Nairobi during the Mau Mau uprising. With growing unease, she questions his account of what really happened in Kenya. A different story – of love and adultery – written by Eve’s mother, comes to light after her death. The two young sisters recount fragments of their time in Africa; their naive voices break into the adult deceptions. White Lies is about different kinds of war and different kinds of loving. It explores the fragility and partiality of memory and our need to re-write the past so that it does not jar with the stories we tell ourselves and others. About the author: Lynn Michell has published 13 books including an illustrated writing scheme for schools, a book about ME, and two books published by The Women’s Press.

    • Adventure
      January 2011

      The Eden Paradox

      by Barry Kirwan

      A murder... a new planet mankind desperately needs... a thousand-year old conspiracy... What really awaits us on Eden? In a world beset by political turmoil, environmental collapse, and a predatory new religion, a recently discovered planet, Eden, is our last hope. But two missions have already failed to return. Blake and his crew lead the final attempt to bring back good news. Meanwhile back on Earth, Eden Mission analyst Micah Sanderson evades assassins, and tries to work out who he can trust, as he struggles in a race against time to unravel the Eden Paradox.

    • Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)
      March 2006

      Marisa

      by Peter Cowlam

      The book’s central time frame is the 1970s, when Bruce takes over a financial consultancy firm founded by his father, and Marisa inherits property. Love, lust and money are what drive them both, until their relationship meets its first challenge. Bruce retreats further into the world of commerce. Marisa’s interests are social and political. Twenty-five years on from their affair, a chance entry in one of Bruce’s business listings shows that Marisa is now boss of the Rae Agency – a media PR concern. Bruce, as he recollects their tumultuous relationship, is torn between his harmonious family life, and renewing contact with Marisa. Finally, when he does decide on a course of action, he has to face the truth of not having grasped the cultural separation their two different views of the world have wrought over the last quarter century.

    • Biography & True Stories

      From That Flame

      A Novelized Account of the Life, Death, and Legacy of Ahmed Shah Massoud

      by MaryAnn T. Beverly

      FROM THAT FLAME follows journalist Michelle Garrett as she interviews the legendary Commander Ahmed Shah Massoud – the “Lion of Panjshir” – in Afghanistan’s rugged Hindu Kush Mountains. Without warning, an attack by Taliban and al-Qaeda troops propels Michelle into a wartime adventure with Commander Massoud and his Mujahidin, one in which a friendship between the journalist and Massoud grows, giving her a unique perspective into the man the Wall Street Journal credited as being “the Afghan who ended the Cold War.”

    • Fiction
      April 2016

      Ring of Stones

      Portal to Another World

      by Alexander Lawes

      When Anna’s dirt bike pulled up alongside late one summer’s evening, Harry grasped the opportunity to escape the city and his troubles, but he never imagined the mysterious girl would lead him across the galaxy to another world. Transported via the Ring of Stones to a planet reflecting a visionary Earth, the friends embark on an intricate pursuit of the truth about what really happened to their missing parents, all the while struggling to remain one step ahead of the sinister Authorities.

    • Fiction
      September 2016

      An Instrument of War

      by Martin Hicks

      It is August 1863 and the Confederate Navy Cruiser Palmetto escapes from Charleston harbour to resume her career as a raider, hunting the shipping of the United States. The succeeding months see her range the Atlantic Ocean before facing a wild passage of Cape Horn, as her Captain Thomas Grover steers his ship for the Orient, seeking ever more victims in his mission to cripple the overseas commerce of the enemy. Martin Hicks lives in Fraserburgh in Aberdeenshire Scotland and began writing after a career in education. “An Instrument of War,” the sequel to “Palmetto,” is his tenth book, all of them set in the war of 1861-65. He is currently working on the third and final book of the “Palmetto” series. By the same author: A Gathering of Soldiers Hard Passage North The Rappahannock Line Mirage of Victory The Bitterest Enemy A Season for Killing A Deepening Twilight Bond of Blood Palmetto

    • Fiction
      January 2017

      Just Deserts

      Book 3 in the Hackers thriller series

      by L. J. Greatrex

      The extraordinary challenges facing our well-established character now known as ‘Bill Pascal’ are all too evident as William Forester seeks to remain invisible to the outside world. A chance encounter leaves him feeling vulnerable once more and he steps up his efforts to discredit and bankrupt the man he holds responsible for the years of struggle he has encountered. Notwithstanding the fortune he has amassed and the now comfortable lifestyle he has carved out, the ever-present doubt that his anonymity will be revealed forces him to take extreme measures to exert the just deserts he has waited so long for.

    • Fiction
      March 2019

      An Enlightened Man

      by Gary W. Hixon

      What should a deeply religious man do when he is shown an artefact that its current custodian believes contains the cryptic clues to the whereabouts of an ancient document, that when found, would destroy everything he has always believed?When events conspire to send Dr Thomas Bass’s life spiralling out of control – at a time when his mind is tormented by the consequences of how he has lived that life – the search for the ‘truth’ contained on an ancient piece of parchment takes him on a frenzied, turbulent journey of self-discovery.But Dr Thomas Bass is not the only one searching for ‘the truth’.

    • Fiction
      November 2009

      The Rogue Druid

      by Gary W. Hixon

      This is an epic story which takes place in many different lands. It tells the story of Carthrall - a new king who will unite the Shiremen and the Bodmifflians. It is about the ruling class of Remrah - a city that used to rule over them. The power of this story lies in the moral questions that are explored in a world where evil manifests itself outwardly and inwardly, and magic can help solve problems. There are joyous celebrations and grueling executions, a gentle romance between Carthrall and Salissa, and a dark obsession that the "rogue druid" has for Salissa. This is a story of warfare and bloodshed, love and loss. The central theme to the book is one of redemption, asking whether someone who has committed the vilest of crimes and who is utterly loathed, but changes and truly repents, should be forgiven and allowed redemption.

    • Crime & mystery

      The Revenge of Sherlock Holmes

      by Phil Growick

      In “The Revenge of Sherlock Holmes”, all the questions left at the surprise ending in “The Secret Journal of Dr. Watson”, will finally be answered.What happened to the Romanov Imperial Family? To Reilly, “Ace of Spies”? To Dr. Watson? But most of all, to Holmes, himself. Historical figures as disparate as King George V, Al Capone, Stalin, Babe Ruth, and Winston Churchill, all play unexpected roles in this most insidious historical mystery. From the infant Soviet Union, to England, New York, the Caribbean and Finland, the world becomes a giant, deadly chessboard. Who will live? Who will die? And why? What terrible mind is behind the deaths and deception? Could it possibly be Sherlock Holmes?And what new questions will arise with the startling climax of “The Revenge of Sherlock Holmes”?

    • Biography & True Stories

      Spirit Mates - The New Time Relationship

      by Anni Sennov, Carsten Sennov

      Most people have heard of the terms ‘soul mate’ and ‘twin soul’. What most people may not yet know is that the concept of soul mate refers to a consciousness realm that is about to completely disappear from the Earth in order to be replaced by the purer and more powerful spirit energy. This is creating great changes in consciousness on Earth and it also means that we humans finally have the opportunity to join together with our spirit mate. In this book the co-authors and spirit mate couple Anni and Carsten Sennov describe with love and insight the different paths and circumstances that can lead you to your spirit mate.

    • Literary Fiction
      January 2012

      Best Paris Stories

      Anthology of the winners of the Paris Short Story Contest

      by Marie Houzelle

      For some, Paris is home, for others, merely a dream. By turns humorous, bittersweet, historical or surreal, each of these carefully selected stories invites us to explore a different facet of Paris. BEST PARIS STORIES brings together the winning short stories of the 2011 Paris Short Story Contest with works by Jeannine Alter, Bob Levy, Lisa Burkitt, Nafkote Tamirat, Marie Houzelle, Jo Nguyen, Julia Mary Lichtblau, Mary Byrne, Marie Houzelle, Jane M. Handel, and Jim Archibald. "Exciting new voices from the winners of the 2011 Paris Short Story Contest" - Paris Writers News

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      January 2009

      Sorbonne Confidential

      by Laurel Zuckerman

      After losing her high tech job in Paris, Alice Wunderland dreams of a new, unemployment-proof career as English teacher and decides to dedicate a year to training for France's prestigious competitive exam; After all, she reasons, how hard can it be for an educated American to pass a test in English? She enrolls at the Sorbonne, but her Arizona English fails to impress. Even Shakespeare's English falls short. Only one English will do: Sorbonne English! Even while learning this new language, Alice vows to investigate: Why devise an English exam that few native speakers can pass ? Could this explain why French schoolchildren rank last for English skills in Europe? Is it true that Frenchness is a question of formatting? If so, can a foreigner even one with French nationality ever become truly French? As riots break out in France among the children of immigrants, Alice cannot help but wonder: could there be any connection between her bewildering experience and theirs? A hilarious, hair-raising insider's look at the esoteric world of French Education. (Harriet Welty Rochefort --author of French Toast).

    • Adventure
      January 2012

      Eden's Trial

      by Barry Kirwan

      First contact did not go well. Survivors are fleeing Earth, into a hostile galaxy where alien intelligence and weaponry rule. Can a deserted planet offer refuge? Or will the genetically engineered Alicians finish the job started on Eden? While Blake fends off attacks, Micah seeks allies, but his plan backfires, and humanity finds itself on trial for its very right to exist.This stunning sequel to The Eden Paradox launches us into political intrigue and an intergalactic war of survival.

    • Adventure
      November 2013

      Eden's Revenge

      by Barry Kirwan

      After eighteen years, the quarantine that has protected humanity's survivors on the planet Esperia is about to end. Mankind won't stand a chance without external help. Yet in the middle of a galactic war, who is concerned about one small planet when worlds fall every day? Eden's Revenge is the heart-stopping third episode in the Eden Saga.

    • Fiction
      January 2011

      True Warriors

      by Ken Kamoche

      Life under dictatorship, Moi, Nairobi, Kenya, London, Britain, political witch-hunting, poaching, ivory trade, financial scandals, studying abroad, interracial relationships, love triangle, land conflicts, Mau mau, freedom fighters, postcolonial Kenya, corruption, searching for identity, finding oneself.

    • Fiction
      January 2012

      Skimmin' Stones

      by Nicholas P. Murray

      A multilayered book that shocks, saddens, invigorates, and definitely entertains. Irish literature. Coming-of-age. Adolescent adventure. Teacher-student relations. First kiss. Dublin. London. Dysfunctional family. Love triangle. Pope. Most wanted man.

    • Fiction
      January 2013

      Black Ghosts

      by Ken Kamoche

      Dan Chiponda earns a scholarship to study in China and reluctantly leaves his native Zimbabwe for an uncertain future. Learning to take racial abuse in his stride, he dates a fellow student, Lai Ying, who is attracted to his easygoing manner. He remains haunted by the weight of his mother’s expectations, encapsulated by the image of the African fish eagle. Things take a dramatic turn when Chinese students pour into the streets in an orgy of violence to drive Africans out of town. The situation in Nanjing only stabilises when attention turns to the mayhem that is unraveling in Tiananmen Square, Beijing. But that is only the beginning of Dan’s troubles with the ‘Campus Gestapo’, loan sharks in Hong Kong, and the shock of his family getting caught up in the violence by Mugabe’s war vets.

    • Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)
      April 2013

      Who’s Afraid of the Booker Prize?

      by Peter Cowlam

      Winner of the 2015 Quagga Prize for Literary Fiction. For Alistair Wye, assistant to ‘top’ novelist Marshall Zob, Zob makes just two mistakes. First, he plans a commemorative book celebrating the life and work of his dead mentor, John Andrew Glaze, whose theory of ‘literary time’ is of dubious philosophical pedigree. Second, Zob turns the whole literary world on its head through the size of advance he instructs his agent to negotiate for his latest, and most mediocre novel to date. Secretly Wye keeps a diary of Zob’s professional and private life. Comic, resolute, Wye stalks through its every page, scattering his pearls with an imperious hand, while an unsuspecting Zob ensures perfect conditions for the chronicles satire. Set in the relatively safe remove of London’s beau monde in the early 1990s, Who’s Afraid of the Booker Prize? unremittingly debunks the phenomenon of literary celebrity. The plot revolves round a researcher working through an archive of computer discs, emails and faxes, and his own diary recording his reactions to life in proximity of bookish heavyweight Marshall Zob. It’s a roaring satire, in the best English comedic tradition.

    • Fiction
      January 2003

      The Wind In The Pylons Vol 1

      The Adventures Of The Mole In Weaselworld

      by Gareth Lovett Jones

      Environmental satire: When Mole (from Kenneth Grahame’s “The Wind In The Willows”) finds a tunnel behind the big old cupboard in his kitchen and goes exploring, little does he know the adventures in store. For the passage-way turns out to be a time tunnel that eventually brings him out in the mid 1990’s – a strange world in which his beloved valley has been devastated by hulking shed-like shopping zones and most of the animals seem to be trapped inside flotillas of bizarrely-shaped contraptions moving at nightmare speeds along a network of titanic roads. He meets descendants or look-alikes of his old chums, all involved in business, politics and such like. But the time tunnel has unaccountably invested in him a magical skill: whomever he is near is unable to resist telling him the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. A biting satire on modern Britain, by turns scathing and heart-rending, The Wind In The Pylons captures its essence, seen through the eyes of an innocent abroad. The author, with sharp eye and cutting wit, holds a mirror up to “the way we live today”: compared with Kenneth Grahame’s bucolic view of life at the turn of the last century, it is not a pretty sight.

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