• Literature & Literary Studies
      January 2019

      Carmen Martín Gaite

      Poetics, Visual Elements and Space

      by Ester Bautista Botello

      This book analyses Carmen Martín Gaite’s novels published in the 1990s. The book is particularly important for its focus on the way a persistent presence of visual elements (drawing, painting and collage) shed light on the relevance of her residence in the United States.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      November 2019

      John Ormond’s Organic Mosaic

      Poetry, Documentary, Nation

      by Kieron Smith

      In a uniquely dualistic creative career spanning five decades, John Ormond made major contributions to both English-language poetry and documentary filmmaking. Born in Swansea, he learned to ‘think in terms of pictures’ while working as a journalist in London, where he secured a job at the celebrated photojournalist magazine Picture Post. Employed later by the BBC in Cardiff during the early days of television, Ormond went on to become a pioneer in documentary film. This book is the first in-depth examination of the fascinating correspondences between Ormond’s twin creative channels; viewing his work against the backdrop of a changing Wales, it constitutes an important case study in the history of documentary filmmaking, in the history of British television, and in the cultural history of Wales.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      February 2020

      New Theoretical Perspectives on Dylan Thomas

      “ A writer of words, and nothing else”?

      by Kieron Smith and Rhian Barfoot

      Dylan Thomas’s reputation precedes him. In keeping with his claim that he held ‘a beast, an angel, and a madman in him’, interpretations of his work have ranged from solemn adoration to dubious mythologising. His many voices continue to reverberate across culture and the arts: from poetry and letters, to popular music and Hollywood film. However, this wide and sometimes controversial renown has occasionally hindered serious analysis of his writing. Counterbalancing the often-misleading popular reputation, this book showcases eight new critical perspectives on Thomas’s work. It is the first to provide in one volume a critical overview of the multifaceted range of his output, from the poetry, prose and correspondence to his work for wartime propaganda filmmaking, his late play for voices Under Milk Wood, and his reputation in letters and wider society. The whole proves that Thomas was much more than his own self-characterisation as a ‘writer of words, and nothing else’.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      August 2016

      A Journey in Translation

      Anne Hébert's Poetry in English

      by Lee Skallerup Bessette

      This book explores the amazing journey of Anne Hébert’s writing into English by people “in the middle” of the process of editing, publishing, distributing, and preservation.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      January 2019

      Critical Rhythm

      The Poetics of a Literary Life Form

      by Glaser, Ben

      Rhythm constitutes an untapped resource for understanding poetry, making legible a range of ways poetry affects us that cannot be parsed through the traditional resources of poetic theory. Rhythm has rich but also problematic roots in nineteenth-century notions of primitive, oral, communal, and sometimes racialized poetics. But there are reasons to understand and even embrace its seductions, including its resistance to lyrical voice and even identity. Pressing beyond poetry handbooks’ isolated descriptions of technique, the book asks what it means to think rhythm.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      January 2019

      Critical Rhythm

      The Poetics of a Literary Life Form

      by Glaser, Ben

      Rhythm constitutes an untapped resource for understanding poetry, making legible a range of ways poetry affects us that cannot be parsed through the traditional resources of poetic theory. Rhythm has rich but also problematic roots in nineteenth-century notions of primitive, oral, communal, and sometimes racialized poetics. But there are reasons to understand and even embrace its seductions, including its resistance to lyrical voice and even identity. Pressing beyond poetry handbooks’ isolated descriptions of technique, the book asks what it means to think rhythm.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      January 2019

      Critical Rhythm

      The Poetics of a Literary Life Form

      by Glaser, Ben

      Rhythm constitutes an untapped resource for understanding poetry, making legible a range of ways poetry affects us that cannot be parsed through the traditional resources of poetic theory. Rhythm has rich but also problematic roots in nineteenth-century notions of primitive, oral, communal, and sometimes racialized poetics. But there are reasons to understand and even embrace its seductions, including its resistance to lyrical voice and even identity. Pressing beyond poetry handbooks’ isolated descriptions of technique, the book asks what it means to think rhythm.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      January 2019

      Critical Rhythm

      The Poetics of a Literary Life Form

      by Glaser, Ben

      Rhythm constitutes an untapped resource for understanding poetry, making legible a range of ways poetry affects us that cannot be parsed through the traditional resources of poetic theory. Rhythm has rich but also problematic roots in nineteenth-century notions of primitive, oral, communal, and sometimes racialized poetics. But there are reasons to understand and even embrace its seductions, including its resistance to lyrical voice and even identity. Pressing beyond poetry handbooks’ isolated descriptions of technique, the book asks what it means to think rhythm.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      April 2018

      Poetry and Mind

      Tractatus Poetico-Philosophicus

      by Dubreuil, Laurent

      What one cannot compute, one must poetize: this essay theorizes the extraordinary regimes of human mental experience by putting the emphasis on poetry. Poetry grants us the ability to move “beyond the limits of thought” and to explore the beyond of cognition. It teaches us to think differently. An elliptic response to Wittgenstein’s point of arrival in the Tractatus, this book is first and foremost an interdisciplinary study of poetry, drawing on literary theory, philosophy, and cognitive science. The work conducted on minds and brains over the last decades in psychology, artificial intelligence, or neuroscience cannot be ignored, if, as “humanists,” we are ever interested in the way we think. Thus, a constant dialogue with the positive examination of cognition serves to better situate the normal regimes of thought—and to underline the other mental possibilities that literature opens up. This essay shows that poetry—a very widespread and possibly universal phenomenon among humans—arises through syntactic structures, cognitive binding, and mental regulations; but that, in going through them, it also exceeds them. The best poems, then, are not only thought experiments but actual thinking experiments for the unthinkable. They expand the usual semantics of natural languages, they singularly deploy the rhetorical armature of speech. They tend to exceed their own algorithms, made of iterations and linguistic re-organizations. They are often reflexive, strange, cognitively dissonant. They provide detachable, movable, and livable significations to our selves. The literary scope of this book is more than “global:” it is uniquely broad and comparative, encompassing dozens of different traditions, oral or written, from all continents, from Ancient times to the contemporary era, with some thirty specific readings of texts, ranging from Sophocles to Gertrude Stein, from Wang Wei to Aimé Césaire, or from cuneiform tablet to rap music.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      April 2018

      Poetry and Mind

      Tractatus Poetico-Philosophicus

      by Dubreuil, Laurent

      “What one cannot compute, one must poetize.” So concludes this remarkable sequence of propositions on the centrality of poetry for what we call cognition. Developed through brief, lucid, and eloquent logical elaborations that are punctuated by incisive readings of a range of poems—Western and non-Western, low culture and high—Poetry and Mind offers to theorists and practitioners of literature, together with logicians and cognitive scientists, a more sophisticated account of the extraordinary regimes of human mental experience. Poetry grants us the ability to move “beyond the limits of thought” and to explore the beyond of cognition. It teaches us to think differently. An elliptic response to Wittgenstein’s point of arrival in the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, this book is first and foremost an interdisciplinary study of poetry, drawing on literary, philosophical, and scientific traditions. The work conducted on minds and brains over the last decades in psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuroscience cannot be ignored if, as humanists, we are interested in the way we think. Dubreuil thus calls for a constant dialogue with the positive examination of cognition to better situate the normal regimes of thought, as well as to underline the other mental possibilities that literature opens up. Poetry and Mind shows that poetry—a widespread and perhaps universal phenomenon among humans—arises through syntactic structures, cognitive binding, and mental regulations, but that, in going through them, it also exceeds them. The best poems, then, are not only thought experiments but actual thinking experiments for the unthinkable. They expand the usual semantics of natural languages, and singularly deploy the rhetorical armature of speech. Made of iterations and linguistic reorganizations, they exceed their own algorithms and, often, they become reflexive, strange, and cognitively dissonant. They provide detachable, movable, and livable significations to our selves. The literary scope of this book is more than “global”: it is uniquely broad and comparative, encompassing dozens of different traditions, oral or written, from all continents, from Ancient times to the contemporary era, with some thirty specific readings of texts, ranging from Sophocles to Gertrude Stein, from Wang Wei to Aimé Césaire, and from cuneiform tablet to rap music. Together, Dubreuil’s readings and elaborations offer a major reappraisal of the relations between creation, language and our embodied brains.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      April 2018

      Poetry and Mind

      Tractatus Poetico-Philosophicus

      by Dubreuil, Laurent

      What one cannot compute, one must poetize: this essay theorizes the extraordinary regimes of human mental experience by putting the emphasis on poetry. Poetry grants us the ability to move “beyond the limits of thought” and to explore the beyond of cognition. It teaches us to think differently. An elliptic response to Wittgenstein’s point of arrival in the Tractatus, this book is first and foremost an interdisciplinary study of poetry, drawing on literary theory, philosophy, and cognitive science. The work conducted on minds and brains over the last decades in psychology, artificial intelligence, or neuroscience cannot be ignored, if, as “humanists,” we are ever interested in the way we think. Thus, a constant dialogue with the positive examination of cognition serves to better situate the normal regimes of thought—and to underline the other mental possibilities that literature opens up. This essay shows that poetry—a very widespread and possibly universal phenomenon among humans—arises through syntactic structures, cognitive binding, and mental regulations; but that, in going through them, it also exceeds them. The best poems, then, are not only thought experiments but actual thinking experiments for the unthinkable. They expand the usual semantics of natural languages, they singularly deploy the rhetorical armature of speech. They tend to exceed their own algorithms, made of iterations and linguistic re-organizations. They are often reflexive, strange, cognitively dissonant. They provide detachable, movable, and livable significations to our selves. The literary scope of this book is more than “global:” it is uniquely broad and comparative, encompassing dozens of different traditions, oral or written, from all continents, from Ancient times to the contemporary era, with some thirty specific readings of texts, ranging from Sophocles to Gertrude Stein, from Wang Wei to Aimé Césaire, or from cuneiform tablet to rap music.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      January 2014

      Reading poetry

      by Peter Barry

      Witty, direct and articulate, Peter Barry illustrates the key elements of poetry at work, covering many different kinds of verse, from traditional forms to innovative versions of the art, such as 'concrete' poetry, minimalism and word-free poems. The emphasis is on meanings rather than words, looking beyond technical devices like alliteration and assonance so that poems are understood as dynamic structures creating specific ends and effects. The three sections cover progressively expanding areas - 'Reading the lines' deals with such basics as imagery, diction and metre; 'Reading between the lines' concerns broader matters, such as poetry and context, and the reading of sequences of poems, while 'Reading beyond the lines' looks at 'theorised' readings and the 'textual genesis' of poems from manuscript to print. Reading poetry is for students, lecturers and teachers looking for new ways of discussing poetry, and all those seriously interested in poetry, whether as readers or writers.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      April 2016

      A Provisional Map of the Lost Continent

      Poems

      by Gregory Mahrer, Foreword by John Yau

      A Provisional Map of the Lost Continent charts a territory built of speculative histories, indeterminate landscapes, and mock narratives, all of them at the threshold linking exterior and interior worlds. Their logic is highly grammatical and slyly confounding, perfectly clear and drawn from dream. It is here, “between / what is occluded and what has elapsed,” that Mahrer’s ambiguous, disordered subjects begin their journeys.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      April 2016

      The Whole by Contemplation of a Single Bone

      Poems

      by Nancy K. Pearson

      In this, her second collection of poetry, Nancy K. Pearson explores the possibilities of recovery and transformation in a world where “words cease to matter.” The speaker attempts to reconcile the past—a past shadowed by depression, addiction, and misdiagnosis. Pearson refuses to end in a place of relief, asking, “[D]on’t we all / fall into aggregate darkness / for something?” Instead, her poems meditate on the lyric of absence and fragmentation. Pearson’s poems are restless, unsettling, and revelatory.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      March 2016

      Algernon Charles Swinburne

      Unofficial Laureate

      by Catherine Maxwell, Stefano Evangelista

      Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909), dramatist, novelist and critic, was late Victorian England's unofficial Poet Laureate. Swinburne was admired by his contemporaries for his technical brilliance, his facility with classical and medieval forms, and his courage in expressing his sensual, erotic imagination. He was one of the most important Victorian poets, the founding figure for British aestheticism, and the dominant influence for fin-de-siècle and many modernist poets. Now available in paperback, this collection of eleven new essays by leading international scholars offers a thorough revaluation of this fascinating and complex figure. It situates him in the light of current critical work on cosmopolitanism, politics, form, Victorian Hellenism, gender and sexuality, the arts, and aestheticism and its contested relation to literary modernism. The essays in this collection reassess Swinburne's work and reconstruct his vital and often provocative contribution to the Victorian cultural debate. ;

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets

      The Limits of Fabrication

      Materials Science, Materialist Poetics

      by Nathan Brown

      Poetry, or poi sis, has long been understood as a practice of making. But how are experiments in the making of poetic forms related to formal making in science and engineering? The Limits of Fabrication takes up this question in the context of recent developments in nanoscale materials science, investigating concepts and ideologies of form at stake in new approaches to material construction. Tracing the direct pertinence of fields crucial to the new materials science (nanotechnology, biotechnology, crystallography, and geodesic design) in the work of Shanxing Wang, Caroline Bergvall, Christian Bök, and Ronald Johnson back to the midcentury development of Charles Olson’s “objectist” poetics, Nathan Brown carves out a tradition of constructivist, nonorganic poetics that has developed in conversation with science and engineering._x000B__x000B_While proposing a new approach to the relation of techn (craft, skill) and poi sis (making, forming), this book also intervenes in philosophical debates concerning the concept of the object, the distinction between organic and inorganic matter, theories of self-organization, and the relation between “design” and “nature.” Engaging with Heidegger, Agamben, Whitehead, Stiegler, and Nancy, Brown shows that materials science and materialist poetics offer crucial resources for thinking through the direction of contemporary materialist philosophy.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets

      The Limits of Fabrication

      Materials Science, Materialist Poetics

      by Nathan Brown

      Poetry, or poi sis, has long been understood as a practice of making. But how are experiments in the making of poetic forms related to formal making in science and engineering? The Limits of Fabrication takes up this question in the context of recent developments in nanoscale materials science, investigating concepts and ideologies of form at stake in new approaches to material construction. Tracing the direct pertinence of fields crucial to the new materials science (nanotechnology, biotechnology, crystallography, and geodesic design) in the work of Shanxing Wang, Caroline Bergvall, Christian Bök, and Ronald Johnson back to the midcentury development of Charles Olson’s “objectist” poetics, Nathan Brown carves out a tradition of constructivist, nonorganic poetics that has developed in conversation with science and engineering._x000B__x000B_While proposing a new approach to the relation of techn (craft, skill) and poi sis (making, forming), this book also intervenes in philosophical debates concerning the concept of the object, the distinction between organic and inorganic matter, theories of self-organization, and the relation between “design” and “nature.” Engaging with Heidegger, Agamben, Whitehead, Stiegler, and Nancy, Brown shows that materials science and materialist poetics offer crucial resources for thinking through the direction of contemporary materialist philosophy.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      June 2013

      2012/2013

      by Joachim Dyck, Hermann Korte, Nadine Jessica Schmidt

      Das Benn Forum erscheint im Zweijahresrhythmus in Verbindung mit der Gottfried Benn-Gesellschaft. Es bietet wissenschaftliche Beiträge zu Leben und Werk Gottfried Benns und zum literarischen Kontext seiner Zeit. Jeder Band präsentiert Aufsätze zu einem speziellen Themenschwerpunkt sowie neue Forschungen zur Biographie Benns und zu Text-Neufunden, außerdem Rezensionen zu wichtigen Neuerscheinungen und eine fortgeschriebene, systematisch angelegte Personalbibliographie. Das Benn Forum stellt damit das zentrale Periodikum der internationalen Benn-Forschung dar.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      November 2018

      Neue Religion in Friedrich Hölderlins später Lyrik

      by Moritz Strohschneider

      The series "QUELLEN UND FORSCHUNGEN ZUR LITERATUR- UND KULTURGESCHICHTE" (Sources and Research in the History of Literature and Culture), with a rich tradition stretching back to 1874, is an established feature among the renowned publications for German Literary Studies. Edited by Ernst Osterkamp and Werner Röcke at the Humboldt University of Berlin, the series presents examples of high-quality scholarship examining literary texts in conjunction with historical cultural phenomena, particularly with the other arts. There is an explicit demand for literary studies with a transdisciplinary approach. German literature from the Middle Ages to the present day forms the main focus of the series. As the historical cultural thrust of the series includes aspects of intercultural experience and national perceptions of the other, Quellen und Forschungen is also open to occasional comparative studies. The publications of the series include monographs, doctoral and professorial theses and thematically focused volumes of collected papers. Works presented for acceptance in the series are required to display scholarly relevance and excellence in method and presentation.

    • Literature: history & criticism
      January 2019

      Servants and the Gothic, 1764-1831

      A half-told tale

      by Kathleen Hudson

      This volume examines a selection of the most complex and important servant characters and servant narratives in early Gothic literature. It defines servant narratives as a Gothic ‘performance’, and examines such servants’ impact on literary, social and personal identity.

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