Featured Titles

    • Biography & True Stories
      March 2019

      Louis XIV

      The Real King of Versailles

      by Josephine Wilkinson

      An intelligent, authoritative, and often surprising biography of the most famous of French monarchs. A fresh perspective on one of the most fascinating kings in European history. Praise for Josephine Wilkinson: 'An impressive revisionist biography.' The Times 'The writing is incisive, rigorous and academic whilst also being accessible and engaging.' Huffington Post Most recently the subject of a lavish primetime BBC historical drama, Louis XIV’s story has all the ingredients of a Dumas classic: legendary beginnings, beguiling women, court intrigue, a mysterious prisoner in an iron mask, lavish court entertainments, the scandal of a mistress who was immersed in the dark arts, and a central character who is handsome and romantic, but with a frighteningly dark side to his character. Louis believed himself to be semi-divine. His self-identification as the Sun King, which was reflected in iconography by the sun god, Apollo, influenced every aspect of Louis’s life: his political philosophy, his wars, and his relationships with courtiers and subjects. As a military strategist, Louis’s capacity was ambiguous, but he was an astute politician who led his country to the heights of sophistication and power—and then had the misfortune to live long enough to see it all crumble away. As the sun began to set upon this most glorious of reigns, it brought a gathering darkness filled with the anguish of dead heirs, threatened borders, and a populace that was dangerously dependent upon - but greatly distanced from - its king.

    • Children's & YA
      May 2012

      Streetlamp Number Eight

      by Cao Wenxuan

      Perched over a green-tiled street, streetlamp number eight watches life as it is plays out on the street below, as if with a pair of attentive eyes. Old codgers, dogs, aged women...they come and go, back and forth. The story is like a stage play, with the street light illuminating the vicissitudes of life.

    • Fiction

      Suburbia

      by Linn Strømsborg

      As Eva finally completes her master’s degree and sits on the roof terrace with her family and friends, champagne flowing freely, it strikes her that she can do whatever she likes – that the future really is up to her. She can find a job, but which? And where? She can find a flat. Fill her days. Live life. The world really is her oyster, as they say, but what will she do with it? She can’t decide. She just can’t do it. And so she moves back home, back into her old bedroom, surrounded by her parents and old circle of friends in the suburban area of Furuset. Before she knows it, she’s wandering through streets she knows inside out, back to live a life that she hadn’t realised that she had left behind. You can’t go home again, said Tom Wolfe. Sure you can, says Linn Strømsborg, but only for a little while. Suburbia is a suburban novel. A post-study depression novel. A novel about growing up in reverse. About friends, music, getting lost and realising that you can’t simply get lost after all. About taking a step back before you might be able to take two forward.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2019

      Safe as Houses

      Grenfell, disaster housing, and the outsourced state

      by Stuart Hodkinson

      As the tragedy of the Grenfell tower fire has slowly revealed a shadowy background of outsourcing, private finance initiatives and a council turning a blind eye to health and safety concerns, many questions need answers. Stuart Hodkinson has those answers. He has worked for the last decade with residents groups in council regeneration projects across London. As residents have been shifted out of 60s and 70s social housing to make way for higher rent paying newcomers, they have been promised a higher quality of housing. Councils have passed the responsibility for this housing to private consortia who amazingly have been allowed to self-regulate on quality and safety. Residents have been ignored for years on this and only now are we hearing the truth. Stuart will weave together his research on PFIs, regulation and resident action to tell the whole story of how Grenfell happened and how this could easily have happened in multiple locations across the country.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2018

      Bridge That Gap!

      How Schools Can Help Students Get Their First Job And Build The Career They Want

      by Angela Middleton

      Bridge That Gap! How Schools Can Help Students Get Their First Job and Build the Career They Want by Angela Middleton is a thoughtful and insightful book that will be of invaluable assistance to teachers who really care about the futures of their pupils. Most education professionals will concede that there is a chasm between school careers advice and the reality for young people in gaining the skills that will help them make it in the real world of employment. This book showcases Angela’s extensive knowledge to explain how a bridge can be built to cross the divide between theory and practice – and will equip teachers with the wherewithal they need to help their pupils fly.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      May 2018

      Free to run

      by Fredrik Svanfeldt

      In the prequel, Sentenced to run, we got to know Johan Dahlberg - a young man with a college degree and permanent employment, who was sentenced to three years in prison. Johan Dahlberg has soon served his sentence and needs to start thinking about his future. But how do you adjust to normal life outside the prison walls when you have been shut away from the world for 2 years? When Johan is released, he does his utmost to balance work with an ambitious running regime. But will he be able to conjure up new exciting goals after having surpassed all expectations. This sequel, Free to Run, is a novel about friendship, love and running and discusses some important questions. How do you find new goals after you have exceeded all expectations? How do you return to work and a social life after two years in prison? How do you find and retain love after being released? How do you combine all this if you also continue to run on elite level?

    • Food & Drink
      September 2017

      Vegans Save the World

      Plant-based Recipes and Inspired Ideas for Every Week of the Year

      by Alice Alvarez,

      Clean Eating LifestylePlant based diet and nutrition: Millions of people have turned to a plant-based diet for the sake of both themselves and the planet. Now, tens of thousands of people have put down their knives in favor of a vegan or vegetarian diet for weight loss or to control blood pressure and cholesterol.Not-so-healthy carnivore to healthy clean eating vegan: Author Alice Mary Alvrez shares her journey from not-so-healthy carnivore to urban homesteader who turned her health around and contributes to a healthier planet as well. This utterly unique vegan cookbook offers over 100 easy-to-make vegan recipes and many basic woman eco-warrior and plant-powered cook recipes. Alvrez shares her green-living methods and cooking techniques as well as sage advice about food and nutrition. Eating your veggies is essential to good health, especially for families and children. Growing the organic veggies you eat is even better!Living vegan and going green tips and tricks: As instructive as it is inspiring, this book is brimming with excellent information about avoiding unhealthy food additives and the importance of eating clean and getting educated about your diet. It is also packed with tips and tricks for living vegan and making sure your home and clothing are cruelty-free. Going green and vegan is easier than you think and this book offers a year's worth of ideas, yummy recipes and ways you can create a sustainable life. More than just a cookbook, Vegans Save the World is necessary

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