• Travel & holiday
      January 2014

      12 Day Trips from London

      A simple guide for those who want to see more than the capital

      by Maldon, Dee

      Aimed at visitors who want to see more than the capital – but don’t want to drive or vacate their hotel room. This little book provides information on using public transport to visit Cambridge, Oxford and Stratford-upon-Avon, as well as les

    • Choo Choo! Pictures Trains Book for Kids (Trains for Kids)

      by Baby Professor

      Choo choo! Move out of the way the train is coming! This wonderful picture book teaches your children about trains using beautiful picture along with some very interesting facts. You can use this resource as a stepping stone to discussing transportation a

    • Things That Go - Trains Edition

      by Baby Professor

      Trains are the cluggity-clugs that you see racing down the tracks. Do you know all there is to know about these wheelers? If not, turn the pages of this book and start learning! Picture books are highly effective at breaking down facts to make them appeal

    • Trucks, Trains and Big Machines! Transportation Books for Kids | Children's Transportation Books

      by Baby Professor

      Does your little boy fall in love with big machines that easily? Then this book will be such a treat! There are beautiful images of trucks, trains and big machines in this wonderful book for children. Learn about them and be impressed at what they can do.

    • Buildings & construction (Children's/YA)

      Why Do Trains Stay on Track? Train Books for Kids | Children's Transportation Books

      by Baby Professor

      Trains go whoosh! They run really fast to get you to your destination in a little time as possible. This book will not just show pictures of trains but will also include information on how it works. The purpose of which is to combine education with a litt

    • The Arts

      THE BIG BOOK OF TRAINS

      by Peter Murray and Lorri Lynn

      The history of rail transport began in 6th century BC in Ancient Greece. It can be divided up into several discrete periods defined by the principal means of track material and motive power used. Evidence indicates that there was 6 to 8.5 km long Diolkos

    • Biography & True Stories
      April 2016

      Isambard Kingdom Brunel

      The Life of an Engineering Genius

      by Colin Maggs

      In his time Isambard Kingdom Brunel was the world's greatest engineer. His list of achievements is truly breathtaking: the Thames Tunnel, the first underwater tunnel in the world; the SS Great Britain, the first propeller-driven ship; the Clifton Suspension Bridge, then the longest span of any bridge in the world; and the Great Western Railway. History has been kind to his memory: many of his creations still exist and he is lauded by historians as a truly 'Great Briton'. In this full-scale biography Colin Maggs presents a portrait of a complex, ambitious and determined genius. But the Brunel that emerges is not without flaws. He made mistakes, both personal and technical – he wasn't always right but never admitted he was wrong. Drawing on Brunel's diaries, letters and business papers, we see the real Isambard, a more human figure, emerging from behind the towering structures and machines he created.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      September 2014

      Steam Trains

      by Colin Maggs

    • Railway transport industries
      March 2013

      Changing Trains

      by Paul Haywood

      "Changing Trains - a Global Review" by Paul Haywood. Railways are always changing and "Changing Trains" gives a truly "Global Review". The author has always tried to use rail as his preferred mode of travel for work and leisure whenever possible and these

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      March 2019

      Class 67 and 68 Locomotives

      by Andrew Cole

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2018

      A Day in the Life of an Engine Driver

      by Anthony Dawson

      In the age of steam it seemed that every little boy had an ambition to be an engine driver – even the notoriously anti-railway Charles Dickens thought there was something alluring about the role. Becoming an engine driver is still an ambition of many, thanks to the steam preservation movement. In this book, Anthony Dawson explores what it was like to be an engine driver in the age of steam. Drawing from his own footplate experiences, and working alongside crews on heritage railways, from waking up at the crack of dawn, to cleaning, firing and driving and eventually disposal at the end of the day, this lavishly illustrated volume is a fascinating insight into what it is like to be an engine driver.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2019

      The Eastern Region in the 1970s and 1980s

      by Andy Gibbs

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      March 2019

      The Fifteen Guinea Special

      The End of Steam and the Story of Preservation on the Mainline

      by Ian Hardman

      The Fifteen Guinea Special was the last steam-hauled British Rail passenger service on 11 August 1968. A day later, the once living and breathing steam locomotives fell silent, some never to run again. Hardman begins with an in-depth look into the Fiftee

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2018

      German Traction

      by Andrew Cole

      Germany, by its very location and size, is host to a vast number of different traction types. The main operator is DB, and they run huge numbers of both freight and passenger workings that still have locomotive haulage. On the passenger side, most main regional centres retain loco-hauled workings, ranging from Class 111s to Class 143s and Class 146s, with the InterCity work operated by Class 101 electric locomotives. A lot of the express passenger workings have gone over to ICE units. There are also still some diesel locomotive diagrams, mostly in the hands of the Class 218 locomotives based mainly around Ulm and also Munich. On the freight side, there are vast numbers of workings operated by both DB and by a large number of private firms. The main DB locomotives used are the Class 185 TRAXX locomotives and also the Class 145 and 152 locomotives, while there are still some big diesels to be seen, most notably the Class 232 locomotives, known as Ludmillas. Upon reunification of Germany, a lot of the former East German locomotives started to appear in the West and vice versa and the enthusiast is always guaranteed to see a wide variety of locomotives in action.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2018

      Great Britain's Railways

      A New History

      by Colin Maggs

      Which was the first railway in Great Britain? Certainly not the one engineered by George Stephenson - one of the first was laid down at Wollaton, near Nottingham, open by 1610, long before Stephenson's birth in 1781. In this comprehensive history, Colin Maggs, one of the country's foremost railway historians, tells the story of over 400 years of British railway history. He covers early horse and gravity-worked lines to those powered by steam, electricity and diesel. The development of locomotives, rolling stock, signalling and major accidents - often marking major changes in how the network was run - are all described in detail. Pivotal moments including the Amalgamation of 1923 when most railway companies became part of the GWR, LMSR or LNER, nationalisation and privatisation are set in their historical context. Colin Maggs also ventures his views on where Britain's railways will go in the future, including HS2 and beyond. Great Britain’s Railways is illustrated with more than 200 photographs of rolling stock, railway architecture and period ephemera.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2018

      Industrial Locomotives & Railways of Yorkshire

      by Gordon Edgar

      This seventh volume in the series of regional books examining the industrial railways of England, Wales and Scotland looks at railways of the former Ridings of Yorkshire, a region that once boasted widespread coal mining activities, which strongly influenced the county’s fortunes throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The numerous steel manufacturing complexes, chiefly centred around the Sheffield and Rotherham area, and the one-time highly polluting coal and chemicals by-products plants are looked at, including the well-known Orgreave complex during the 1980s, a time when many coal mines and their supporting industries and railways were rapidly dwindling in number, a fact sadly driven home when examining the contents of this book. Other industries in the county, once heavily reliant on railways, either internal narrow gauge or standard gauge, included an extensive peat bog railway system east of Doncaster, water treatment plants around Leeds and Bradford, gas and electricity plants serving some of the county’s towns and cities, numerous scrapyards supporting steel manufacturing, stone quarries in the rich limestone region to the north of the county, and brick and block manufacturers in the Vale of York, all contributing to the rich industrial railway heritage of Yorkshire. With informative captions and an array of striking and many previously unpublished historical colour and monochrome photographs, author Gordon Edgar delivers a fascinating overview of the industrial locomotives and railways of Yorkshire, essentially covering the last six decades and striving to convey the attraction of the many former industrial railways of this vast and topographically varied county.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2018

      InterCity 225

      Class 91 Locomotives and Mark 4 Coaches

      by Rich Mackin

      Ordered in 1985, the Class 91 was a joint venture between GEC, Brush and ASEA to deliver a fleet of 140 mph tilting electric locomotives for the East Coast Main Line. Delivered between 1988 and 1991, the thirty-one locomotives ply their trade daily from London to the North East and Scotland. Accompanied by Metro-Cammell’s Mark 4 coaches, they formed British Rail’s flagship ‘Intercity 225’ programme. While the 225s never tilted nor reached their full speed, for nearly thirty years they have conveyed thousands of passengers each day along the ECML. Today, the Class 91s and Mark 4s are approaching the end of their working lives. Once Hitachi’s Class 800 Intercity Express trains are delivered, a small handful of Class 91s will work with shortened Mark 4 sets on non-stop services. The majority of the fleet faces an uncertain future, with no clear plans for redeployment elsewhere. This book looks at these East Coast workhorses, which have followed in the footsteps of Gresley’s famous Pacific locomotives, the Deltics and HSTs.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2018

      Rail Rover: Anglia Ranger

      by Adam Head

      East Anglia can sometimes be overlooked in favour of the larger mainlines that run through this country but, as can be seen by this exhibition of the sights found within the boundaries of an Anglia Day Ranger, it can be an interesting and often picturesque place to spend time on the rails. From the vast open areas of the Norfolk Broads on the Wherry Lines from Norwich to Great Yarmouth/Lowestoft to the busier commuter stations such as Cambridge, Rail Rover: Anglia Ranger looks at all the various branch lines, with a variety of different operators working in and around the area and a plethora of different coloured liveries only enhancing the already rich colours of East Anglia.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2018

      Railways of the South East Since the 1970s

      by John Law

      John Law moved to South East London in 1970 and joined British Rail four years later. Starting at the lowest grade, he soon became a guard at Grove Park and then moved to Victoria, where he often worked the boat trains and the prestigious British Pullmans of the Venice-Simplon Orient Express. Moving through the grades, he worked at London Bridge and other stations in the central area of the capital. In later years he became a site manager with Network Rail, before retiring in 2009. During all those years, he carried a camera and took photographs of the railways of Kent, East Sussex and South East London. He was able to capture views from locations that were inaccessible to the general public, building up a huge collection of images showing the variety of rolling stock, signalling and the changing scene of those years.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2018

      Railways of Wales in the 1960s

      by John Evans

      The beauty of its mountain and coastal scenery has always made the railways of North Wales special. During the 1960s, as fast as steam was fading on the main lines, it was flourishing on the narrow gauge railways, hinting at the great potential that was to come. Those fledgling railways that are today’s major tourist attractions possessed a special, rudimentary charm as they came to terms with the challenges of gearing up for a new army of admirers. This book takes you on a tour in essays and colour pictures of all the narrow gauge railways then in operation and also the British Rail routes that were facing an uncertain future. John Evans brings his unique way with words and pictures to capture a scene that has in many ways changed dramatically … and meets some veteran locomotives that we can still enjoy today.

    Subscribe to our newsletter