• Asian history
      March 2020

      Uniquely Okinawan

      by Courtney A. Short

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2020

      The Good Assassin

      Mossad's Hunt for the Butcher of Latvia

      by Stephan Talty

      Before the Second World War, Herbert Cukurs was a world-famous aviator and a hero in his hometown of Riga, Latvia. During the war he joined the SS, led a militia and was responsible for the genocide of 30,000 Latvian Jews. By the 1960s the man who became

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2020

      Britain's Forgotten Traitor

      The Life and Death of a Nazi Spy

      by Ed Perkins

      In November 1943, with the Second World War at its height, a 58-year-old London-born man claiming to be a refugee from the Nazis arrived by flying boat at Poole Harbour. His name was Oswald John Job and he said he had escaped from internment by the Germa

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2020

      The Ghosts of Langley

      Into the Heart of the CIA

      by John Prados

      The Ghosts of Langley is the story of spymasters, their minions, and the ways in which the Central Intelligence Agency changed the world. These were determined men and women who believed in their mission, followed White House orders ‒ and sometimes circumvented them. It is also the story of some brave reformers who attempted to change the CIA’s culture but were swept under the rug, or worse, converted to the dark side. The Ghosts of Langley uses profiles of key figures in CIA history as a lens through which to examine the history of American intelligence and the ways that actions undertaken by the CIA agents helped create the situation the nation now faces, taking into account not only covert operations, but intelligence analysis, technological discoveries and more. John Prados reaches into areas that have never before been explored in books on the agency, including how its lawyers helped define the parameters of accountability for intelligence gathering and the ways in which covert operations are conducted and revealed. Along the way, he reveals the existence of US intelligence beyond White House control.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2020

      Operation Lena and Hitler's Plots to Blow Up Britain

      by Bernard O'Connor

      Home-grown terrorists equipped by a foreign power are not a new phenomenon. During the Second World War, Hitler’s Germany made sustained efforts to inflict a terror campaign on the streets of Britain through the use of secret agents and agents provocateurs. The aim was to blow up military, industrial, transport and telecommunication targets, to lower morale among the civilian population and disrupt the war effort. Even before the outbreak of war, the Nazis provided the IRA with assistance for their plan to sabotage the British mainland. Prior to their planned invasion in the summer of 1940, the Nazis were also keen to recruit members of the Welsh and Scottish Nationalist Parties to engage in sabotaging British targets and, over the course of the war, infiltrated dozens of trained agents from countries including Norway, Denmark, Holland, France and Cuba. What happened to the myriad plots to blow up Britain? We know that intelligence obtained from decrypted enemy messages via Bletchley Park and double agents like ZIGZAG, SUMMER and TATE alerted MI5 to some of these spies’ arrivals, but what about the others? And how successful were MI5’s efforts to fake acts of sabotage and arrange media coverage to fool the enemy into thinking their agents were still at large and on task? In this book, Bernard O’Connor, a noted wartime espionage historian, tells the complete story of the successes and failures of the Nazi terror offensive on mainland Britain during 1938–1944.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2020

      SOE Heroines

      The Special Operations Executive's French Section and Free French Women Agents

      by Bernard O'Connor

      Nearly forty female agents were sent out by the French section of Britain’s Special Operations Executive (SOE) during the Second World War. The youngest was 19 and the oldest 53. Most were trained in paramilitary warfare, fieldcraft, the use of weapons and explosives, sabotage, silent killing, parachuting, codes and cyphers, wireless transmission and receiving, and general spycraft. These women – as well as others from clandestine Allied organisations – were flown out and parachuted or landed into France on vital and highly dangerous missions: their task, to work with resistance movements both before and after D-Day. Bernard O’Connor uses recently declassified government documents, personnel files, mission reports and memoirs to assess the successes and failures of the 38 women including Odette Sansom, Denise Colin, and Cécile Pichard. Of the twelve who were captured, only two survived; the others were executed, some after being tortured by the sadistic officers of the Gestapo. This is their story.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2019

      Mr Charming

      by Michael Harrison

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2019

      Police in Nazi Germany

      by Paul Garson

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2019

      Rough Justice

      The True Story of Agent Dronkers, the Enemy Spy Captured by the British

      by David Tremain, Nigel West

      Early in the morning of 18 May 1942, three Dutchmen were captured in the North Sea and taken to MI5. It soon became clear that one in particular, Johannes Marinus Dronkers, was no mere refugee escaping the Nazi occupation. He had a hidden agenda: to betray secrets about the state of Britain’s war preparedness to the German Abwehr. It was to be an intriguing episode in the cat-and-mouse game played between German and British intelligence. But was Dronkers guilty, or was he made an example of by the British authorities, his fate pre-determined by the climate of war-torn Britain? And why wasn’t he turned, as MI5 had done and would do to many other enemy spies? The Dronkers case raises important questions about the process of dealing with wartime spies and the punishments meted out by British authorities. Using newly available official files and other sources, this book examines the details of Dronker’s recruitment, capture and interrogation by MI5, as well as his trial at the Old Bailey. David Tremain compares the Dronkers case with that of other wartime spies, reveals the Abwehr’s lost recipe for secret ink, and exposes exactly what made a Dutchman escape to England in 1942 betray his country. This unsettling story has remained a little-known episode of the Second World War until now.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2016

      Thorough surveillance

      by Ahmad Sa'di

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