• History & the past: general interest (Children's/YA)

      Marco Polo : The Boy Who Explored China Biography for Kids 9-12 | Children's Historical Biographies

      by Baby Professor

      Marco Polo was only a young boy when he joined his uncle and father in a journey to Asia. You can pretty much say that he was born to see the world. By reading his life story, your child might be encouraged to explore the world too. It will also open your

    • History & the past: general interest (Children's/YA)

      The Emperors of the Roman Empire - Biography History Books | Children's Historical Biographies

      by Baby Professor

      It’s not everyday that you can meet the emperors of times past. That’s why this book is special. It does not only list down the names of the emperors who ruled the Roman Empire, there are interesting facts to match them too! Which emperor created the most

    • History & the past: general interest (Children's/YA)

      All About the 15 Famous Greek Philosophers - Biography History Books | Children's Historical Biographies

      by Baby Professor

      How many of these famous Greek philosophers do you know? Each of these fifteen gave a great contribution to history. Not only did they work on numbers, they also molded societies, cultures, philosophies and beliefs. The philosophers may have died many yea

    • History & the past: general interest (Children's/YA)

      The Top 8 Most Powerful Pharaohs of Egypt - Biography for Kids | Children's Historical Biographies

      by Baby Professor

      Enter the world of the powerful pharaohs and learn all about them! In this educational book, your child will be transported back to the ancient times. It’s interesting to note that the book does not only give dates, times and names. It also incorporates f

    • History & the past: general interest (Children's/YA)

      Who Was Joseph Stalin? - Biography Kids | Children's Historical Biographies

      by Baby Professor

      Why do people hate Joseph Stalin as much as they hate Hitler? Read on and you'll know the answer soon! You want your child to read about Stalin because you want him/her to understand the thought process and why decisions were made that way. Yes, this is n

    • Biography & True Stories
      July 2017

      Still I Rise

      The Persistence of Phenomenal Women

      by Marlene Wagman-Geller

      #1 New Release on Amazon! — Who are the great women leaders in history? Who are the women heroes who personify "girl power"?Intrepid women heroes: When Nelson Mandela was imprisoned in South Africa’s brutal Ro

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Anne Boleyn

      Adultery, Heresy, Desire

      by Amy Licence

      Anne Boleyn’s unconventional beauty inspired poets ‒ and she so entranced Henry VIII with her wit, allure and style that he was prepared to set aside his wife of over twenty years and risk his immortal soul. Her sister had already been the king’s mistress, but the other Boleyn girl followed a different path. For years the lovers waited; did they really remain chaste? Did Anne love Henry, or was she a calculating femme fatale? Eventually replacing the long-suffering Catherine of Aragon, Anne enjoyed a magnificent coronation and gave birth to the future Queen Elizabeth, but her triumph was short-lived. Why did she go from beloved consort to adulteress and traitor within a matter of weeks? What role did Thomas Cromwell and Jane Seymour of Wolf Hall play in Anne’s demise? Was her fall one of the biggest sex scandals of her era, or the result of a political coup? With her usual eye for the telling detail, Amy Licence explores the nuances of this explosive and ultimately deadly relationship to answer an often neglected question: what choice did Anne really have? When she writes to Henry during their protracted courtship, is she addressing a suitor, or her divinely ordained king? This book follows Anne from cradle to grave and beyond. Anne is vividly brought to life amid the colour, drama and unforgiving politics of the Tudor court.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      La Reine Blanche

      Mary Tudor, A Life in Letters

      by Sarah Bryson

      Mary Tudor’s childhood was overshadowed by the men in her life: her father, Henry VII, and her brothers Arthur, heir to the Tudor throne, and Henry VIII. These men and the beliefs held about women at the time helped to shape Mary’s life. She was trained to be a dutiful wife and at the age of eighteen Mary married the French king, Louis XII, thirty-four years her senior. When her husband died three months after the marriage, Mary took charge of her life and shaped her own destiny. As a young widow, Mary blossomed. This was the opportunity to show the world the strong, self-willed, determined woman she always had been. She remarried for love and at great personal risk to herself. She loved and respected Katherine of Aragon and despised Anne Boleyn – again, a dangerous position to take. Author Sarah Bryson has returned to primary sources, state papers and letters, to unearth the truth about this intelligent and passionate woman. This is the story of Mary Tudor, told through her own words for the first time.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2018

      Lady M

      The Life and Loves of Elizabeth Lamb, Viscountess Melbourne 1751-1818

      by Colin Brown

      At a time of emerging women leaders, the life of Elizabeth Milbanke, Viscountess Melbourne, the shrewdest political hostess of the Georgian period, is particularly intriguing. It was Byron who called her ‘Lady M’ and it was Byron’s tempestuous and very public affair with Elizabeth’s daughter-in-law Lady Caroline Lamb that was the scandal of the age. Lady M rose above all adversity, using sex and her husband’s wealth to hold court among such glittering figures as Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, the Whig leader and wit Charles James Fox and the playwright Sheridan. Her many lovers included Lord Egremont, Turner’s wealthy patron, and the future George IV. Elizabeth schemed on behalf of her children and her ambitions were realised when her son William Lamb (‘Lord M’) became the young Queen Victoria’s confidant and Prime Minister. Based upon primary research – diaries, archives and extensive correspondence between Lady M and Lord Byron – Colin Brown examines the Regency period and its pre-Victorian code of morals from the perspective of a powerful and influential woman on the 200th anniversary of her death.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      On the Trail of Mary, Queen of Scots

      A visitor’s guide to the castles, palaces and houses associated with the life of Mary, Queen of Scots

      by Roy Calley

      Mary, Queen of Scots is one of the great tragic figures of British history. Born in Scotland one December morning in 1542, she was to become Queen of Scots just six days later. Growing up mostly in France and marrying the sickly French king Francis II in 1559, she returned to Scotland on his death, a widow at the age of eighteen. Four years later she married Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, but their miserable union ended with his murder and her subsequent marriage to his alleged killer, the Earl of Bothwell. Forced by rebellion to flee south to England, she was confined by her cousin Queen Elizabeth I in various manor houses and castles before, eighteen years later, being executed on her cousin's orders. On the Trail of Mary, Queen of Scots takes the reader on a journey through the landscape of Mary's time. In her footsteps we will visit resplendent castles, towering cathedrals, manor homes, chapels and ruins associated with Mary. Each location is brought to life through an engaging narrative and a collection of photographs and works of art.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2019

      Louis XIV

      by Josephine Wilkinson

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2019

      Shoot for the Moon

      by James Donovan

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2019

      Killing Napoleon

      The Plot to Blow up Bonaparte

      by Jonathan North

      It was Christmas Eve 1800. The streets of Paris were crowded with citizens. Some were shopping, some were eating and drinking. But others were plotting to murder the most famous and powerful man in France. They wheeled their improvised bomb into town earlier that day, and waited. Then, amongst the milling crowd, they saw the target. Despite knowing that the bomb would kill indiscriminately, the fuse was lit, and the enormous explosion wreaked havoc. The target for this early act of terrorism was Napoleon Bonaparte, who had seized power the year before and found himself the enemy of republicans and royalists alike. The terrorists belonged to the royal faction and although they failed to kill Napoleon, their atrocity hurled political violence in a new and terrifying direction; towards a now familiar place where civilian casualties would be collateral damage and where bombs in packed streets and squares would be the new conduit of terror. This book sets the scene with Napoleon’s coup and follows the cell of extremists as they prepare their plans and devise a weapon that became known as the ‘Infernal Machine’. After their attack, we follow the security services as they hunt down the perpetrators, baffled by the novelty of terrorism, as Napoleon uses public anger to launch a war on his opponents. Using first-hand accounts, trial transcripts and archival material - and with all the drama of a detective story - Killing Napoleon recounts one of the great crimes of its era, a story still largely unknown in the English-speaking world; and a precursor to the terrorist threats we know today.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2019

      Arbella Stuart

      The Uncrowned Queen

      by Jill Armitage

      In 1562, Elizabeth I, the last of Henry VIII’s children, lay dying of smallpox, and the curse of the Tudor succession again reared its head. The queen was to recover, but the issue remained: if the queen did not produce an heir, who was next in line to succeed? Lady Arbella Stuart was cousin to both the English queen and James VI of Scotland, a woman whose parents’ marriage had been orchestrated to provide an heir to the English throne. Raised by her formidable grandmother, Bess of Hardwick, Arbella lived her life in Elizabeth’s shadow and, unfortunately, at her mercy. In this book, Jill Armitage revitalises Arbella’s tale, focusing on her lineage, her life and her legacy. Through her story we discover a well-born, well-educated woman desperate to control her own fate, but who is ultimately powerless against those in the scheming Tudor court; and the author explores the harsh consequence that comes from being on the wrong side of the revenge of a jealous, calculating queen.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2019

      The Fighting Jew

      The Life and Times of Daniel Mendoza, Champion Boxer

      by Wynn Wheldon

      Daniel Mendoza is unarguably among the most important boxers in the history of the sport. Begetter of the Golden Age of British pugilism, one populated by dandies and royals, characterised by the bludgeon and revolution, Mendoza turned what had been a co

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2019

      Four Queens and a Countess

      Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, Mary I, Lady Jane Grey and Bess of Hardwick: The Struggle for the Crown

      by Jill Armitage

      When Mary Stuart was forced off the Scottish throne she fled to England, a move that made her cousin Queen Elizabeth very uneasy. Elizabeth had continued the religious changes made by her father and England was a Protestant country, yet ardent Catholics plotted to depose Elizabeth and put Mary Stuart on the English throne. So what was Queen Elizabeth going to do with a kingdomless queen likely to take hers? She had her placed under house arrest with her old friend Bess of Hardwick, then married to her fourth husband, the wealthy and influential Earl of Shrewsbury. The charismatic Scotswoman was treated more like a dowager queen than a prisoner and enjoyed the Shrewsbury’s affluent lifestyle until Bess suspected Mary of seducing her husband. But for sixteen years, with the never-ending threat of a Catholic uprising, Bess was forced to accommodate Mary and her entourage at enormous cost to both her finances and her marriage. Bess had also known the doomed Jane Grey and Mary Tudor, Queen of France. She had been in service in the Grey household and companion to the infant Jane. Mary Tudor had been godmother to Bess’s fifth child. Four Queens and a Countess delves deep into the relationships of these women with their insurmountable differences, the way they tried to accommodate them and the lasting legacy this has left. The clash of personalities and its deadly political background have never been examined in detail before.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2019

      Owen Tudor

      Founding Father of the Tudor Dynasty

      by Terry Breverton

      ‘The Welsh habit of revolt against the English is an old-standing madness … from the sayings of the prophet Merlin they still hope to recover their land. Hence, they frequently rebel … but because they do not know the appointed time, they are often deceived and their labour is in vain.’ (Vita Edwardi Secundi) The appointed time, it turned out, was 1485. For generations, the ancestors of Welshman Owen Tudor had fought Romans, Irish Picts, Vikings, Saxons, Mercians and Normans. His uncles had been executed in the Glyndwr Welsh War of Independence. Owen fought for Henry V in France and entered the service of Henry’s queen, Catherine of Valois. Soon after the king’s death he secretly married her, the mother of the eight-month-old Henry VI. Owen and Catherine would have two boys together. Henry VI would go on to ennoble them as Edmund Earl of Richmond, and Jasper Earl of Pembroke, but upon Catherine’s death Owen was imprisoned. Escaping twice, Owen was thrown into the beginnings of the Wars of the Roses with two of his sons. It would be Edmund’s son, Henry Tudor, who would take the English throne as Henry VII. When Jasper led the Lancastrian forces at Mortimer’s Cross in 1461, the ageing Owen led a wing of the defeated army, was captured and executed. Without his earlier secret marriage for love, there would have been no Tudor dynasty.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2019

      A Year in the Life of Medieval England

      by Toni Mount

      The medieval era is often associated with dynastic struggles, gruesome wars and the formidable influence of the Church. But what about the everyday experience of the royal subjects and common people? Here, alongside the coronations, diplomatic dealings and key battles, can be found the fabric of medieval life as it was really lived, in its folk songs, recipes and local gossip. With a diverse range of entries – one for each day of the year – historian Toni Mount provides an almanac for lovers of all things medieval. A detailed picture is gathered from original sources such as chronicles, manor court rolls, coroners’ rolls and the records of city councils. We learn not only of the royals and nobles of official history but also the quarrels of a miscellany of characters, including William and Christopher of York, Nalle Kittewritte who stole her neighbours’ washing, and Margery from Hereford who was murdered by an Oxford student. The world in which they laboured, loved and lived is vividly reimagined, one day at a time.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2019

      John Morton

      Adversary of Richard III, Power Behind the Tudors

      by Stuart Bradley

      John Morton (c. 1420–1500) was one of the most important men in the land from the Wars of the Roses to the start of the Tudor dynasty. Yet he has been largely ignored in recent times. He was a man of great character and influence over politics and the Church. He lived into his eighties, having served three kings as a councillor, Master of the Rolls, Lord Chancellor, bishop, Archbishop of Canterbury and Cardinal. He was a key figure in the early Tudor state. He had escaped from the Tower of London, lived in exile twice, and was a major adversary of Richard III. He funded the building of Hatfield Palace, the first drainage of the fens, and the central tower of Canterbury Cathedral. The Morton Missal contained the first printed music in England. As S. B. Chrimes observed, ‘There can be little doubt that Morton was the key figure in Henry VII’s government, nothing approaching an adequate study of his life and role has yet been published.’ In fact, no detailed biography of Morton has been produced since Victorian times. This book follows John Morton’s career through the reigns of Henry VI and Edward IV, and his central role in opposition to Richard III, before his fifteen years as Lord Chancellor to Henry VII, which were crucial to the establishment of the Tudor dynasty.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2019

      Anna, Duchess of Cleves

      The King's 'Beloved Sister'

      by Heather R. Darsie

      Anna was the ‘last woman standing’ of Henry VIII’s wives - and the only one buried in Westminster Abbey. How did she manage it? Anna, Duchess of Cleves: The King's ‘Beloved Sister' looks at Anna from a new perspective, as a woman from the Holy Roman Empi

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