• Health & Personal Development
      April 2011

      Gesund durch Meditation

      Das große Buch der Selbstheilung

      by Kabat-Zinn, Jon / Übersetzt von Kroh, Marion B.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference

      Deutsche Sprachgeschichte

      Eine Einführung in die diachrone Sprachwissenschaft des Deutschen

      by Peter Ernst

    • Teaching, Language & Reference

      Germanistische Sprachwissenschaft

      Eine Einführung in die synchrone Sprachwissenschaft des Deutschen

      by Ernst Peter

    • Children's & YA
      September 2019

      The Proto Project

      by Bryan R. Johnson

      When Jason meets his mom’s billion-dollar invention, an artificial intelligence device named Proto, he accidentally gets caught up in a mysterious adventure. Proto goes missing, and then people go missing. Now Jason and his coolest-neighbor-ever Maya must risk their lives to prevent global mayhem. But who is behind this devious plot? Is it another AI? The FBI? Or any other abbreviation with an I? And what exactly is there to learn about artificial and human intelligence while fighting for your life against a legion of furry puppies or a battalion of drones? Apparently, a lot. That is, if you live to tell about it.

    • Children's & YA
      September 2019

      Codigo 7

      Descifrando el código para una vida épica

      by Bryan R. Johnson

      A Bilingual Spanish-English Chapter Book for Young Language Learners La vida en la primaria Flint Hill puede parecer normal, pero siete amigos se encuentran en el camino para descifrar el código de una vida épica. Ya sea que estén persiguiendo sus sueños en el escenario, buscando un pez monstruo evasivo, o ejecutando un negocio improvisado desde una casa del árbol, ¿pueden estos héroes encontrar una manera de trabajar juntos para cambiar su comunidad? Life at Flint Hill Elementary School may seem normal, but seven friends soon find themselves on a path to crack the code for an epic life. Whether they’re chasing their dreams on stage, searching for an elusive monster fish, or running a makeshift business out of a tree house, can these heroes find a way to work together to change their community?

    • Biography & True Stories
      March 1905

      Alaska Days with John Muir

      by Samuel Hall Young

      Samuel Hall Young, a Presbyterian clergyman, met John Muir when the great naturalist's steamboat docked at Fort Wrangell, in southeastern Alaska, where Young was a missionary to the Stickeen Indians. In "Alaska Days With John Muir" he describes this 1879 meeting: "A hearty grip of the hand and we seemed to coalesce in a friendship which, to me at least, has been one of the very best things in a life full of blessings." This book, first published in 1915, describes two journeys of discovery taken in company with Muir in 1879 and 1880. Despite the pleas of his missionary colleagues that he not risk life and limb with "that wild Muir," Young accompanied Muir in the exploration of Glacier Bay. Upon Muir's return to Alaska in 1880, they traveled together and mapped the inside route to Sitka. Young describes Muir's ability to "slide" up glaciers, the broad Scotch he used when he was enjoying himself, and his natural affinity for Indian wisdom and theistic religion. From the gripping account of their near-disastrous ascent of Glenora Peak to Young's perspective on Muir's famous dog story "Stickeen," Alaska Days is an engaging record of a friendship grounded in the shared wonders of Alaska's wild landscapes.

    • Health & Personal Development
      March 1905

      Ginseng and Other Medicinal Plants

      by A. R. Harding

      This book is made up largely from the experiences of hunters and trappers who have dug "seng" and "seal" and who know much of their peculiarities, and scores are now successful growers.In adidtion to Ginseng and Golden Seal nearly 50 other medicinal plants are described--habits, range, price, uses, etc.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      March 1905

      How to Cook Fish

      by Myrtle Reed

      This book is a collection of recipes for fish cooking.

    • Children's & YA
      March 1905

      The Crimson Sweater

      by Ralph Henry Barbour

      The story of a schoolboy who proves himself through rugged feats in football and hockey.

    • Historical fiction
      February 1905

      Anna Karenina

      by Leo Tolstoy

      Widely regarded as a pinnacle in realist fiction, Tolstoy considered Anna Karenina his first true novel, after he came to consider War and Peace to be more than a novel. Fyodor Dostoyevsky declared it "flawless as a work of art." His opinion was shared by Vladimir Nabokov, who especially admired "the flawless magic of Tolstoy's style," and by William Faulkner, who described the novel as "the best ever written." The novel remains popular, as demonstrated by a 2007 Time poll of 125 contemporary authors in which Anna Karenina was voted the "greatest book ever written.

    • Horror & ghost stories
      May 1987

      Dracula

      by Bram Stoker

      Dracula is an 1897 Gothic horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker. It introduced Count Dracula, and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy. The novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and of the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and a woman led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

    • Horror & ghost stories
      December 1904

      Frankenstein

      Or The Modern Prometheus

      by Mary Shelley

      Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (or simply, Frankenstein for short), is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley (1797-1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a grotesque but sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was 18, and the first edition of the novel was published anonymously in London in 1818, when she was 20. Her name first appeared on the second edition, published in France in 1823.

    • Shakespeare plays
      September 1904

      Hamlet

      by William Shakespeare

      Hamlet is Shakespeare's longest play, and is considered among the most powerful and influential works of world literature, with a story capable of "seemingly endless retelling and adaptation by others". The play likely was one of Shakespeare's most popular works during his lifetime, and still ranks among his most performed, topping the performance list of the Royal Shakespeare Company and its predecessors in Stratford-upon-Avon since 1879. It has inspired many other writers—from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Charles Dickens to James Joyce and Iris Murdoch—and has been described as "the world's most filmed story after Cinderella"

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      March 1905

      Heart of Darkness

      by Joseph Conrad

      Heart of Darkness (1899) is a novella by Polish-British novelist Joseph Conrad, about a voyage up the Congo River into the Congo Free State, in the heart of Africa, by the story's narrator Charles Marlow. Marlow tells his story to friends aboard a boat anchored on the River Thames, London, England. This setting provides the frame for Marlow's story of his obsession with the ivory trader Kurtz, which enables Conrad to create a parallel between London and Africa as places of darkness.

    • Poetry by individual poets
      July 1855

      Leaves of Grass

      by Walt Whitman

      This book is notable for its discussion of delight in sensual pleasures during a time when such candid displays were considered immoral. Where much previous poetry, especially English, relied on symbolism, allegory, and meditation on the religious and spiritual, Leaves of Grass (particularly the first edition) exalted the body and the material world. Influenced by Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Transcendentalist movement, itself an offshoot of Romanticism, Whitman's poetry praises nature and the individual human's role in it. However, much like Emerson, Whitman does not diminish the role of the mind or the spirit; rather, he elevates the human form and the human mind, deeming both worthy of poetic praise.

    • Historical fiction
      February 1905

      Les Misérables

      by Victor Hugo

      Examining the nature of law and grace, the novel elaborates upon the history of France, the architecture and urban design of Paris, politics, moral philosophy, antimonarchism, justice, religion, and the types and nature of romantic and familial love. Les Misérables has been popularized through numerous adaptations for the stage, television, and film, including a musical and a film adaptation of that musical.

    • Family & home stories (Children's/YA)
      February 1905

      Little Women

      by Louise May Alcott

      Little Women "has been read as a romance or as a quest, or both. It has been read as a family drama that validates virtue over wealth", but also "as a means of escaping that life by women who knew its gender constraints only too well".[6]:34 According to Sarah Elbert, Alcott created a new form of literature, one that took elements from Romantic children's fiction and combined it with others from sentimental novels, resulting in a totally new format. Elbert argued that within Little Women can be found the first vision of the "All-American girl" and that her multiple aspects are embodied in the differing March sisters.

    • Poetry
      July 1904

      Paradise Lost

      by John Milton

      Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton. The first version, published in 1667, consisted of ten books with over ten thousand lines of verse. A second edition followed in 1674, arranged into twelve books (in the manner of Virgil's Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout and a note on the versification. The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Milton's purpose, stated in Book I, is to "justify the ways of God to men".

    • Classic fiction (pre c 1945)
      January 2018

      Ulysses

      by James Joyce

      Ulysses chronicles the peripatetic appointments and encounters of Leopold Bloom in Dublin in the course of an ordinary day, 16 June 1904.[4][5] Ulysses is the Latinised name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer's epic poem Odyssey, and the novel establishes a series of parallels between the poem and the novel, with structural correspondences between the characters and experiences of Leopold Bloom and Odysseus, Molly Bloom and Penelope, and Stephen Dedalus and Telemachus, in addition to events and themes of the early 20th century context of modernism, Dublin, and Ireland's relationship to Britain. The novel imitates registers of centuries of English literature and is highly allusive.

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