• Boxing
      October 2013

      Marvelous

      The Marvin Hagler Story

      by Brian and Damian Hughes

      Marvelous Marvin Hagler is a sporting legend. Often called the greatest middleweight boxer of all time, he held the world title for 12 defences, including bouts with Sugar Ray Leonard, Thomas Hearns and Roberto Duran which entered fistic folklore. From his wild early fights in the boxing wilderness of Brockton, Massachusetts, Brian and Damian Hughes trace the blazing trail of Hagler's career: the controversial defeats subsequently avenged, a riot-scarred title win in London, and his unification of the middleweight crown. Hagler became a huge favourite, taking on all comers while never taking a step back. And so to The Ring magazine's "greatest round of all time" against Hearns, his ferocious battle with Duran, and the still-controversial loss to his nemesis Leonard. Marvelous tells the story of Hagler's extraordinary life for the first time, separating truth from myth to get right to the heart of a complex and charismatic man.

    • Boxing
      September 2014

      Road to Nowhere, The

      A Journey Through Boxing's Wastelands

      by Tris Dixon

      In the era of boxing's pay-per-view superstars, Tris Dixon invested in a Greyhound bus pass and spent several months traversing America on a shoestring budget, tracking down fighters from yesteryear who had vanished from the limelight. Venturing from New York to Las Vegas and from Toronto to Miami, the young writer - himself a former amateur boxer - sought out coulda-beencontenders and cult heroes from the 1950s to the 2000s, all now faded from popular memory. He visited old people's homes, gyms and too many prisons, discovering that life after boxing can be a cruel place when the ropes are no longer in place to keep fighters safe from the outside world. Dixon meets men who shaped boxing history, fighting the likes of Sugar Ray Robinson, Muhammad Ali and Mike Tyson. He shares their memories and weaves together their forgotten tales over the course of a remarkable American journey.

    • Boxing
      July 2015

      Dempsey and the Wild Bull

      The Four Minute Fight of the Century

      by John Jarrett

      They still call it the most sensational fight ever for the world heavyweight championship, between champion Jack Dempsey and his hammer-fisted Argentine challenger, Luis Angel Firpo. Back in the Roaring Twenties, 85,000 packed into New York's Polo Grounds to see all three minutes fifty-seven seconds of it. Nobody asked for their money back. In the first round Firpo was floored seven times, but got up to deck the champion, then knocked him clean into the press section. Pushed back into the ring as the count reached nine, the champion survived the round, thinking he had been knocked out. In round two, Dempsey knocked Firpo out in fifty-seven seconds. The four-minute Fight of the Century was over! 'The Wild Bull of the Pampas' became Argentina's most famous citizen, after the infamous Perons. Dempsey, half a million dollars richer, rested and rusted for three years before losing his title to Gene Tunney.

    • Boxing
      April 2015

      Ali Files, The

      His Fights, His Foes, His Fees, His Feats, His Fate

      by Norman Giller

      This book is for all Ali fans. It's more than thirty years since Muhammad Ali last threw a punch, yet he remains unquestionably the best-known sportsman of all time. A whole generation now only know the legend of The Greatest, never saw him fight, and yet are in awe of the man and his fantastic fistic feats. The Ali Files gives the facts behind the fable. Author Norman Giller became friends with Ali when he worked as his European publicist, and he has gathered many other intimate eyewitnesses - opponents, referees, trainers, sparring partners, celebrity fans and ringside reporters - to Ali's astonishing adventures in and out of the ring. Millions of words have been written about ringmaster Ali, but few books have concentrated on the 61 professional contests that turned him into a sporting legend. The Ali Files will give you a ringside seat to the greatest boxing career of all time.

    • Biography: sport

      A Welshman in the Bronx

      Tommy Farr Vs Joe Louis

      by Graeme. Kent

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2018

      Ali

      The Fight America Didn't Want

      by Russell Routledge

      Has everything been said about Muhammad Ali, once the most famous man in the world? No. There is one special bout that has, over time, been largely overlooked, where both the fight and shenanigans surrounding it have never been fully examined. In early 1970, a fight involving Ali was avoided by just about every city in America – until Atlanta in Georgia decided to take a chance. They proposed an Ali fight with ‘Great White Hope’ Jerry Quarry. The comparison of Ali’s comeback bout with that of ‘Great White Hope’ Jim Jeffries and his return against Jack Johnson in 1910 was unavoidable. Atlanta, once fertile soil for the racism, was inundated with objections when a prize fight involving Ali, a black Muslim draft evader facing a possible five-year prison sentence, was planned. When the ‘Black Mecca’ of the South eventually put on the fight it attracted not only Ali’s legion of die-hard fans but also every echelon of African American society. They came together to witness the return of their fighting hero, but for some unlucky ringside spectators the party spirit was soon replaced by anger, empty pockets and rumours of deadly retribution. An after-party became the scene of perhaps one of the biggest and most brazen armed robberies in Atlanta’s history. Ali’s life would be forever linked to the city that reintroduced him to the ring. Twenty-six years later, the same city and same fighter would come together in one of the most memorable moments in sporting history, when Ali lit the Olympic flame in front of the whole world.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      August 2015

      Richmond Unchained

      The Biography of the World's First Black Sporting Superstar

      by Luke G. Williams

      Today Bill Richmond is largely unknown to the wider public, but he was one of the most significant sportsmen in history and one of the most prominent celebrities of Georgian times. Born into slavery in Staten Island, Richmond won his freedom as a young boy and carved a new life for himself in England as a cabinet maker and then a renowned prizefighter and trainer. His amazing life encompassed encounters and relationships with some of the most prominent men of the age, including Earl Percy, William Hazlitt, Lord Byron, the Prince Regent and Lord Camelford. His fame was such that he fulfilled an official role at the coronation celebrations of King George IV in 1821. The story of Bill Richmond is an incredible tale of personal advancement, as well as the story of a life informed and influenced by a series of turbulent historical events, including the American War of Independence, the fight for black emancipation and Britain’s long-running conflict with Napoleon Bonaparte.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2019

      The Fighting Jew

      The Life and Times of Daniel Mendoza, Champion Boxer

      by Wynn Wheldon

      Daniel Mendoza is unarguably among the most important boxers in the history of the sport. Begetter of the Golden Age of British pugilism, one populated by dandies and royals, characterised by the bludgeon and revolution, Mendoza turned what had been a contest of brute strength with the indiscipline of a street brawl into what some called a science, some an art – but certainly a sport. As a publicist, he was expert manipulator of public opinion. More than this, he used the anti-Semitism of his times to his own benefit, and in so doing raised the social status of his fellow Jews. His final achievement was to have written what may be the first sports autobiography, his memoirs. He was, in all these many respects, quite exceptional, a superstar. Or, as one contemporary put it, ‘The Complete Artist’. Astonishingly, this is the first full biography of one of Britain’s greatest sporting heroes.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      February 2020

      East End Born & Bred

      The Remarkable Story of London Boxing

      by Jeff Jones

      No other place in the world has been so important to boxing, or produced so many champions, as the small area of London's East End. How did this specific part of Britain shape boxing, and what was behind the national and international success of these fighters? In this book, boxing expert and Londoner Jeff Jones tells a unique story, of the development of modern boxing, from unregulated bare-knuckle fights in the docks and taverns, to the codification of boxing's rules, the increasing sophistication of training and technique, the involvement of bookmakers and the underworld, and the development of a lucrative worldwide sport - where men from London's East End still take part as boxers and promoters, 300 years after the sport's beginnings in their local streets.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      October 2019

      The Fighting Jew

      The Life and Times of Daniel Mendoza, Champion Boxer

      by Wynn Wheldon

      As one of the first Jewish sporting superstars, Daniel Mendoza, boxing champion of England 1792-1795, challenged perceptions and stereotypes - he demanded respect. He is said to have been the first Jew to talk privately at length to the King. He made history by taking part in the first sporting event with an entrance fee. He pioneered ‘side-stepping’ and was the greatest ‘scientific boxer’ of the age. Daniel Mendoza is unarguably among the most important boxers in the history of the sport. Begetter of the Golden Age of British pugilism, patronised by dandies, royals and roaring boys, he was the creator of a sporting revolution at a time of political revolution. While there was a general prohibition on boxing, Mendoza’s fight with Sam Martin in 1787 was arranged by the Prince of Wales! The diminutive Mendoza turned what had been a contest of brute strength with the indiscipline of a street brawl into what some called a science, some an art - but certainly a sport. As a publicist, he was an expert manipulator of public opinion. More than this, he used the anti-Semitism of his times to his own benefit, and in so doing raised the social status of his fellow Jews. By proving himself to be a great fighter, Mendoza helped to elevate the Jewish community and has been inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame as well as The Ring magazine Hall of Fame. His final achievement was to have written what may be the first sports autobiography. He was, in all these respects, quite exceptional, a superstar; or, as one contemporary put it, ‘The Complete Artist’. Astonishingly, this is the first full biography of one of Britain’s greatest sporting heroes.

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      February 2020

      East End Born and Bled

      The Remarkable Story of London Boxing

      by Jeff Jones, Harry Redknapp

      No other place in the world has been so important to boxing, or produced so many champions, as the small area of London’s East End. But how did this specific part of Britain shape boxing, and what was behind the national and international success of these fighters? In this book, Londoner Jeff Jones tells the unique story of the development of modern boxing. Starting with the unregulated bare-knuckle fights in the docks and taverns, he covers the codification of boxing’s rules, the increasing sophistication of training and technique, the involvement of bookmakers and the underworld, and the development of a lucrative worldwide sport in which men from London’s East End still take part as boxers and promoters, three centuries after the sport’s beginnings in their local streets.

    • Boxing
      July 2015

      Ungloved

      Memories from the Ring

      by Benjamin Calder-Smith

      Benjamin Calder-Smith travelled around the UK for 18 months meeting and interviewing a broad cross-section of former fighters and boxing personalities. He now presents the stories of huge forgotten talents, coulda-been contenders and men who established a foothold in British boxing history, highlighting the highs and lows of their careers in and out of the ring. From the agonies of injury and enforced retirement to a poignant late comeback inspired by personal tragedy; from a British Boxing Board of Control-licensed ringside doctor to a late-blossoming veteran of the ring, Ungloved features unique, varied and personal accounts of the 'noble art' from a bygone age. Memories are relayed with the same passion as was expended in the ring, describing the good, the bad and the ugly with brutal honesty and heart-warming humility. These moving accounts provide living proof that, when knocked down, the human spirit has infinite capacity to bounce back.

    • Biography: sport

      Team Calzaghe

      by Michael Pearlman

      In November 2008, Joe Calzaghe retired undefeated in his brilliant boxing career after his fight against American great Roy Jones at New York's Madison Square Garden. Never beaten in 46 fights, Calzaghe stands tall as one of the greatest sportsman in British history, having been a world champion for over a decade. The man behind his success is father and mentor Enzo Calzaghe, a former busker who became a world renowned boxing trainer, producing four world champions from his tiny South Wales gym. With interviews with the key boxers, "Team Calzaghe" explores the amazing success of the Calzaghes and their boxing family, including Enzo Maccarinelli, Bradley Pryce, Gary Lockett and Gavin Rees. It also lifts the lid on the battles with booze, bulimia and the authorities as the Calzaghes defied their critics to rule the boxing world. Quick Reads are exciting, short, fast-paced books by leading, bestselling authors, specifically written for emergent readers and adult learners.

    • Boxing
      September 2014

      Journeymen

      The Other Side of the Boxing Business, a New Perspective on the Noble Art

      by Mark Turley

      Journeymen tells a story that is often purposely ignored - that of the modern-day boxers who lose for a living. Far from huge purses and pay-per-view hype, the book lays bare the reality of the boxing business and the way it works in small-hall venues countrywide. October 2013 saw the 100th and final fight in the career of East London's Johnny Greaves, remarkable in that he won only four contests. He took fights at short notice, facing young prospects with the implicit understanding that he was not there to win. Journeymen features in-depth interviews with Greaves and other men who have similarly served the fight game, including Kristian Laight (180 defeats), Jason Nesbitt (178) and Daniel Thorpe (113). Though sometimes dark, their tales reveal humour, wisdom and sporting pride: the journeymen eschew glamour, make the best of what they have and face the world with a smile and a wink.

    • Boxing
      July 2015

      Boxing On This Day

      History, Facts & Figures from Every Day of the Year

      by Nick Parkinson

      Boxing On This Day revisits the sport's most magical moments, from title tear-ups, shocks and famous knockouts to bizarre dramas. Here are hundreds of ring highlights, all mixed in with a maelstrom of quirky anecdotes and legendary characters to produce an irresistibly dippable boxing diary - with an entry for every day of the year. It's not just the stunning punches and smart one-liners that makes the history of the fight game so absorbing. Boxing is never far from controversy or hyperbole, surviving fixes and numerous scandals while producing some of sport's most famous names from Dempsey to Louis, from Ali to Tyson, from Lennox Lewis to Floyd Mayweather Jr. As well as recalling heroic, controversial, funny, tragic and surreal events, Boxing On This Day benefits from brilliant research, gathering together many original stories in a concise history of boxing from the 19th century to 2015.

    • Boxing
      September 2015

      Wiped Out?

      The Jerome Wilson Story

      by Jerome Wilson with Mark Turley

      Wiped Out tells the story of welterweight prospect Jerome 'Wipeout' Wilson – and shines a light on boxing's ultimate taboo. On 12 September 2014, in his 11th professional fight, Jerome was knocked out in the sixth round. He never got up. Wilson was rushed to hospital and spent ten days comatose. He had suffered a subdural haematoma, a large bleed on the brain. When he finally came to, his sense of reality had unravelled. He was unable to speak or move. Eventually he was discharged with a quarter of his skull missing. As soon as he was able, Jerome recorded his innermost thoughts in a unique diary, which traces his gradual reconnection with the world. Published on the first anniversary of his injury, Wiped Out is the most personal reaction to massive brain trauma ever put on paper. Jerome's future is uncertain, but he knows he is lucky to be alive.

    • Boxing
      June 2014

      Fighting Men of London

      Voices from Inside the Ropes

      by Alex Daley

      Fighting Men of London explores the lives of seven former professional boxers who fought in the capital between the 1930s and 1960s. Set around a series of interviews, it resurrects a golden age of the sport when boxing was as popular as football and Britain's leading fighters were working-class heroes. Dramatic, poignant, inspiring and at times funny, the book covers such subjects as booth fighting, exploitation in boxing, East End poverty, World War Two London, Jewish culture, fame and success, crime, prison life and encounters with such figures as the Kray twins, the Great Train Robbers and Britain's most infamous inmate, Charles Bronson. Fighting Men of London takes us on a journey through a lost era of smoky fight halls, ramshackle boxing arenas and courageous fighting men. It features the previously untold stories of 1950s boxing star Sammy McCarthy, Bethnal Green knockout specialist Ted Berry (an associate of the Kray twins) and Sid Nathan, who as one of Britain's last surviving 1930s boxers once shared a fight bill with the great Jack Kid Berg. This isn't a single story, but seven stories of seven very different men. The common bond they shared was boxing.

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