• Local history

      Cornish Guernseys & Knitfrocks

      by Mary Wright

      In late 19th century Cornwall hand-knitting was a vital cottage industry and coastal villages developed their own distinctive patterns and names for the traditional navy blue guernsey or knit-frock. Contract-knitting - the occupation of many Cornish women - had died out by the 1920s and was almost forgotten until author Mary Wright started asking old people what they remembered of it. Her research has resulted in a remarkable picture of social history. Cornish Guernseys & Knit-frocks includes many delightful contemporary photographs, and detailed instructions and charts show how to knit a Cornish guernsey incorporating one of thirty local patterns.

    • Biography: historical, political & military
      March 2016

      Flushed With Pride

      The Story of Thomas Crapper

      by Wallace Reyburn

      Flushed With Pride celebrates the life and times of Thomas Crapper, the Victorian sanitary ware manufacturer who revolutionised the nation's water closets. This new edition has been updated by Simon Kirby, the Managing Director of the Thomas Crapper Company.

    • Local history
      December 1995

      Good Old Coney Island

      by Edo McCullough

    • Travel & Transport
      December 1997

      How We Got to Coney Island

      The Development of Mass Transportation in Brooklyn and Kings County

      by Brian J. Cudahy

      Coney Island is the most famous seaside resort the world has ever known. This new book by transportation historian Brian Cudahy tells how a unique blend of enterprises emerged in the final years of the nineteenth century to connect Coney Island with the independent municipality of Brooklyn, with New York City, and, ultimately, with the rest of the world. The story of travel to Coney Island involves horse-drawn streetcars, steam-powered railways, and elevated trains running along viaducts over city streets, not to mention a cable-powered railway that once crossed the Brooklyn Bridge, sidewheel excursion boats steaming down the Narrows, and even such contemporary transport options as air-conditioned subway trains and private automobiles speeding along the Belt Parkway. How We Got to Coney Island is, in reality, the definitive history of mass transportation in Brooklyn. It tells how a famous general by the name of Henry Slocum, who fought with Meade at Gettysburg became the president of the first rail company to serve Coney Island.;It also describes the origins of a company called Brooklyn Rapid Transit that eventually unified the street, excursion, and elevated railways of Brooklyn into a smoothly functioning system in the final years of the nineteenth century. Brooklyn Rapid Transit, though, would not survive. While it did participate in the construction of a massive citywide subway system in the early years of the twentieth century, the company entered receivership in 1918, was re-organized as the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation five years later, only to surrender its corporate status entirely in 1940 and become the BMT Division of the Board of Transportation of the City of New York. The era that is critical to these developments, though, is the last quarter of the nineteenth century, when entrepreneurs raised enormous sums of private capital, and constructed railways across the lightly settled flatlands of southern Kings County so people could travel to and from Coney Island. Cudahy's new book also tells how the city of Brooklyn became only the third city in all of America to deploy a system of horse-powered streetcars so its citizens could enjoy an enhanced level of urban mobility.;How We Got to Coney Island includes tables, charts, photographs, and maps. The full story of transportation to and from the world's most famous seaside resort also provides an enticing glimpse into what people did once they reached Coney Island.

    • Popular beliefs & controversial knowledge

      The Rosslyn Hoax?

      Viewing Rosslyn Chapel from a New Perspective

      by

      Subtitled, }Viewing Rosslyn Chapel From A New perspective{. Following the success of }The Da Vinci Code{, eminent Scottish Freemason, Robert Cooper, takes a look at the origin of Rosslyn Chapel. Exploring and exploding many myths, Cooper asks whether we, the public, have been the victims of a massive hoax and wonders whether the meaning of the Kirkwall Scroll has been hijacked for a particular purpose. And, ultimately, who benefits from trying to cover it all up?

    • Travel & Transport
      December 1997

      How We Got to Coney Island

      The Development of Mass Transportation in Brooklyn and Kings County

      by Brian J. Cudahy

      Coney Island is the most famous seaside resort the world has ever known. This new book by transportation historian Brian Cudahy tells how a unique blend of enterprises emerged in the final years of the nineteenth century to connect Coney Island with the independent municipality of Brooklyn, with New York City, and, ultimately, with the rest of the world. The story of travel to Coney Island involves horse-drawn streetcars, steam-powered railways, and elevated trains running along viaducts over city streets, not to mention a cable-powered railway that once crossed the Brooklyn Bridge, sidewheel excursion boats steaming down the Narrows, and even such contemporary transport options as air-conditioned subway trains and private automobiles speeding along the Belt Parkway. How We Got to Coney Island is, in reality, the definitive history of mass transportation in Brooklyn. It tells how a famous general by the name of Henry Slocum, who fought with Meade at Gettysburg became the president of the first rail company to serve Coney Island.;It also describes the origins of a company called Brooklyn Rapid Transit that eventually unified the street, excursion, and elevated railways of Brooklyn into a smoothly functioning system in the final years of the nineteenth century. Brooklyn Rapid Transit, though, would not survive. While it did participate in the construction of a massive citywide subway system in the early years of the twentieth century, the company entered receivership in 1918, was re-organized as the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation five years later, only to surrender its corporate status entirely in 1940 and become the BMT Division of the Board of Transportation of the City of New York. The era that is critical to these developments, though, is the last quarter of the nineteenth century, when entrepreneurs raised enormous sums of private capital, and constructed railways across the lightly settled flatlands of southern Kings County so people could travel to and from Coney Island. Cudahy's new book also tells how the city of Brooklyn became only the third city in all of America to deploy a system of horse-powered streetcars so its citizens could enjoy an enhanced level of urban mobility.;How We Got to Coney Island includes tables, charts, photographs, and maps. The full story of transportation to and from the world's most famous seaside resort also provides an enticing glimpse into what people did once they reached Coney Island.

    • Travel & holiday

      The Western San Juan Mountains

      Their Geology, Ecology, and Human History

      by Rob Blair

      This book has four parts. The first part concerns the physical environment and includes a description of landform evolution, geologic history, economic geology, and weather. The second edition describes the various ecosystems encountered, primarily with reference to vegetation zones because they remain relatively fixed and are easy to identify. The third part focuses on the human history of the area, beginning with the earliest known inhabitants, followed by the incursion of the Spanish and, later miners, searching for the 'mother lode'. The fourth section is a 'points of interest' guide around the Skyway, the Alpine Loop and the railroad between Durango and Silverton.

    • Local history

      The City and the Saloon

      Denver, 1858-1916

      by Thomas J Noel

      During Denver's wild ride from frontier mining town to twentieth-century metropolis, the city's saloons, like those of many other western frontier towns, played a vital role in the development of the city. Now with a new preface, Tom Noel's classic study, The City and the Saloon, is a liquid history of how Denver's bars both shaped and reflected the Mile High city's birth and adolescence.

    • True crime

      Hell's Belles

      Prostitution, Vice, and Crime in Early Denver, With a Biography of Sam Howe, Frontier Lawman

      by Clark Secrest

      This newly updated and revised edition of HELL'S BELLES takes the reader on a soundly researched, well-documented, and amusing journey back to the early days of Denver. Clark Secrest details the evolution of Denver's prostitution, the gambling, the drug addicts, and the corrupt politicians and police who, palms outstretched, allowed it all to happen. Also included in HELL'S BELLES is a biography of one of Denver's original police officers, Sam Howe, upon whose crime studies the book is based. The popular veneer of Denver's present-day Market Street -- its fancy bars, posh restaurants, and Coors Field -- is stripped away to reveal the street's former incarnation: a mecca of loose morals entrenched in prostitution, liquor, and money. Hell's Belles examines the neglected topics of vice and crime in Denver and utilises a unique and invaluable historic source -- the scrapbooks of Detective Sam Howe.

    • Local history

      Bayou Salado

      The Story of South Park

      by Virginia McConnell Simmons

      First published in 1966, BAYOU SALADO is an engaging look at the history of a high cool valley in the Rocky Mountains. Now known as South Park, Bayou Salado once attracted Ute and Arapaho hunters as well as European and American explorers and trappers. Virginia McConnell Simmons's colourful accounts of some of the valley's more notable residents -- such as Father Dyer, the skiing Methodist minister-mailman, and Silver Heels, the dancer who lost her legendary beauty while tending to the ill during a small pox epidemic -- bring the valley's storied past to life.

    • The natural world, country life & pets

      Mesa Verde National Park

      Shadows of the Centuries

      by Duane A Smith

      Originally published in 1988, MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK: SHADOWS OF THE CENTURIES is an engaging and artfully illustrated history of an enigmatic assemblage of canyons and mesas tucked into the southwestern corner of Colorado. Duane A Smith recounts the dramatic 1888 'discovery' of the cliff dwellings and other Anasazi ruins and the ensuing twenty-year campaign to preserve them. Smith also details the resulting creation of a national park in 1906 and assesses the impact of more recent developments -- railroads and highways, air pollution, and the growing significance of tourism -- on the park's financial and ecological vitality. This revised and completely redesigned edition includes more than 50 illustrations and will be enjoyed by readers interested in environmental, Western, and Colorado history.

    • Local history

      Boomtown Blues

      Colorado Oil Shale

      by Andrew Gulliford

      First published in 1989, 'Boomtown Blues' examines the remarkable 100-year history of oil shale development and chronicles the social, environmental, and financial havoc created by the industry's continual cycles of boom and bust.

    • Local history

      The Archaeology of Class War

      The Colorado Coalfield Strike of 1913-1914

      by Karin Larkin (Editor) , Randall H. McGuire (Editor)

      The Archaeology of the Colorado Coalfield War Project has conducted archaeological investigations at the site of the Ludlow Massacre in Ludlow, Colorado, since 1996. With the help of the United Mine Workers of America and funds from the Colorado State Historical Society and the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities, the scholars involved have integrated archaeological finds with archival evidence to show how the everyday experiences of miners and their families shaped the strike and its outcome. This book weaves together material culture, documents, oral histories, landscapes, and photographs to reveal aspects of the strike and life in early twentieth-century Colorado coalfields unlike any standard documentary history. Excavations at the site of the massacre and the nearby town of Berwind exposed tent platforms, latrines, trash dumps, and the cellars in which families huddled during the attack. Myriad artefacts -- from canning jars to a doll's head -- reveal the details of daily existence and bring the community to life. The book will be of interest to archaeologists, historians, and general readers interested in mining and labour history.

    • Biography: general

      Emma Lee

      by Juanita Brooks

      Now in its eighth printing, Emma Lee is the classic biography of one of John D. Lee's plural wives. Emma experienced the best and worst of polygamy and came as near to the Mountain Meadows Massacre as anyone could without participating firsthand.

    • Local history

      Folklore in Utah

      A History and Guide to Resources

      by David Stanley

      Over thirty scholars examine the development of folklore studies through the lens of over one hundred years of significant activity in a state that has provided grist for the mills of many prominent folklorists. In the past the Folklore Society of Utah has examined the work of such scholars in biographical and other essays published in its newsletters. This book incorporates those essays and goes well beyond them to include many other topices, offering a thorough history of folklore studies and a guide to resources for those pursuing research in Utah now and in the future. The essays survey the development and contributions of folklore studies in Utah from 1892 to 2004 but also represent developments in both academic and public-sector folklore throughout the United States. Following a thorough historical introduction, part I profiles the first folklorists working in the state, including Hector Lee, Thomas Cheney, Austin and Alta Fife, Wayland Hand, and Lester Hubbard. Part II looks at the careers of prominent Utah folklorists Jan Harold Brunvand, Barre Toelken, and William B. Wilson, as well as the works of the next, current generation of folklorists. Part III covers studies in major folklore genres, with essays on the study of material culture, vernacular architecture, and Mormon, ethnic, Native American, and Latino folklore. Part IV examines public folklore programs including organizations, conferences, and tourism. Back matter describes academic programs at Utah institutions of higher education, summarizes the holdings of the various folklore archives in the state, and provides a complete cross-indexed bibliography of articles, books, and recordings of Utah folklore.

    • Local history

      Ghost Country

      A Collection of Poems

      by Herbert Williams

    • Biography: general

      Wapiti Wilderness

      by Margaret Murie , Olaus Murie

      For over thirty-seven years, Margaret and Olaus Murie made their home in the mountainous wilderness of the Tetons, where Olaus Murie conducted his famous studies of the American elk, the wapiti. Through these years their home was almost a nature-conservation shrine to thousands of Americans interested in the out-of-doors, in animals, in nature in general. In alternate chapters, Olaus tells of his work as a field biologist for the old US Bureau of Biological Survey and recounts stories of his studies. Mrs Murie, from her side, describes their life together, on the trail, in the various camps, and nature adventures in that wilderness during all four seasons. The book is replete with stories of Jackson Hole people, of 'pioneer poets', and of the wild creatures that made their way into the Murie household. Olaus Murie's evocative pen-and-ink drawings illuminate each chapter, and four pages of photographs help complete the picture of what life was like in the wapiti wilderness.

    • History

      African Americans on the Western Frontier

      by Monroe Lee Billington (Editor), Roger D. Hardaway (Editor)

      During the last half of the nineteenth century, several thousand African Americans moved to the American western frontier. Before the Civil War, some went west to California as slaves of gold miners and to Utah as slaves of Mormons. Later, free black men joined the U.S. Army and served in frontier outposts while others were hired on as cowboys on western ranches and cattle trails. Once Reconstruction ended in the South, discrimination and segregation caused more African Americans to seek better opportunities elsewhere where prejudice was less evident. The significant role played by African Americans in the settlement and development of the West has largely been ignored and neglected until now. African Americans on the Western Frontierremedies that historic neglect with fifteen essays that explore the contributions that African American men and women made to the western frontier-as miners, homesteaders, town builders, entrepreneurs, and as ordinary, civic-minded citizens. This rich and diverse story of the African American western experience during the frontier era is for scholars and students of western history as well as anyone interested in African American history, and is an important work for all Americans to read.

    • Literature: history & criticism

      Interpreting the Legacy

      John Neihardt and Black Elk Speaks

      by Brian Holloway

      Neihardt's work has recently been critiqued by scholars who maintain that the author filtered and corrupted Black Elk's teachings through a European spiritual and political lens. In this book, Brian Holloway offers a rather different view, making a convincing case that Neihardt quite consciously attempted to use his literary craftsmanship to provide the reader with direct and immediate access to the teachings of the Oglala elder. Using Neihardt's original hand written notes and early manuscript drafts, Holloway demonstrates the poet's careful and deliberate re-creation of Black Elk's spiritual world in order to induce a transcendent experience in the reader. Through exhaustive research into Neihardt's biographical materials, published philosophical and metaphysical writings, and volumes of taped lectures, Holloway examines the sources of the book's production as well as the reactions to and the implications of his literary portrayal of the spiritual world of the Oglala.

    • Local history

      Pikes Peak Partnership

      The Penroses & the Tutts

      by Thomas J Noel

      Historians Tom Noel and Cathleen Norman tell the incredible tale of the two families who transformed Colorado Springs and its environs into a tourist haven. By building the Broadmoor Hotel and other important facilities to attract travellers, Spencer Penrose, who once proclaimed that 'any man who works after lunch is a fool', made the Pikes Peak region a pleasure seeker's paradise.

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