• Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      British Urban Trees

      A Social and Cultural History c.1800–1914

      by Paul A. Elliott

      GREENING THE VICTORIAN URBAN WORLD Whether we consider the great London Planes which are now the largest trees in many British urban streets, the exotic ornamentals from across the globe flourishing in numerous private gardens, the stately trees of public parks and squares or the dense colourful foliage of suburbia, the impact of trees and arboriculture upon modern towns and their ecosystems is clear. From the formal walks and squares of the Georgian town to Victorian tree-lined boulevards and commemorative oaks, trees are the organic statuary of modern urban society, providing continuity yet constantly changing through the day and over the seasons. Interfacing between humans and nature, connecting the continents and reaching back and forward through time to past and future generations, they have come to define urbanity while simultaneously evoking nature and the countryside. This book is the first major study of British urban arboriculture between 1800 and 1914 and draws upon fresh approaches in geographical, urban and environmental history. It makes a major contribution to our understanding of where, how and why trees grew in British towns in the period, the social and cultural impact of these and the attitudes taken towards them.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2018

      Reconstructing modernity

      Space, power and governance in mid-twentieth century British cities

      by James Greenhalgh

      Reconstructing modernity assesses the character of approaches to rebuilding British cities during the decades after the Second World War. It explores the strategies of spatial governance that sought to restructure society and looks at the cast of characters who shaped these processes. It challenges traditional views of urban modernism and sheds new light on the importance of the immediate post-war for the trajectory of planned urban renewal in twentieth century. It examines plans and policies designed to produce and govern lived spaces- shopping centers, housing estates, parks, schools and homes - and shows how and why they succeeded or failed. It demonstrates how the material space of the city and how people used and experienced it was crucial in understanding historical change in urban contexts. The book is aimed at those interested in urban modernism, the use of space in town planning, the urban histories of post-war Britain and of social housing.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2018

      Reconstructing modernity

      Space, power and governance in mid-twentieth century British cities

      by James Greenhalgh

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2018

      Reconstructing modernity

      Space, power and governance in mid-twentieth century British cities

      by James Greenhalgh

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2017

      Realising the city

      Urban ethnography in Manchester

      by Camilla Lewis, Jessica Symons

      This book offers an inside view of Manchester, England demonstrating the complexity of urban dynamics from a range of ethnographic vantage points, including the city's football clubs, the airport, housing estates, the Gay Village and the city's annual civic parade. These perspectives help trace the multiple dynamics of a vibrant and rapidly changing post-industrial city, showing how people's decisions and actions co-produce the city and give it shape. Using the metaphor of the kaleidoscope, with each turn of the wheel, another aspect of the city is materialised. In doing so, the contributors complicate the dominant narrative of Manchester's renaissance as driven by the city administration's entrepreneurial ethos. By taking up civic space and resources with council-led cultural representations focused largely on generating financial income for the city, three decades of command-and-control politics has inhibited grassroots and spontaneous forms of emergent publics.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2017

      Realising the city

      Urban ethnography in Manchester

      by Camilla Lewis, Jessica Symons

      This book offers an inside view of Manchester, England demonstrating the complexity of urban dynamics from a range of ethnographic vantage points, including the city's football clubs, the airport, housing estates, the Gay Village and the city's annual civic parade. These perspectives help trace the multiple dynamics of a vibrant and rapidly changing post-industrial city, showing how people's decisions and actions co-produce the city and give it shape. Using the metaphor of the kaleidoscope, with each turn of the wheel, another aspect of the city is materialised. In doing so, the contributors complicate the dominant narrative of Manchester's renaissance as driven by the city administration's entrepreneurial ethos. By taking up civic space and resources with council-led cultural representations focused largely on generating financial income for the city, three decades of command-and-control politics has inhibited grassroots and spontaneous forms of emergent publics.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2017

      Realising the city

      Urban ethnography in Manchester

      by Camilla Lewis, Jessica Symons

      This book offers an inside view of Manchester, England demonstrating the complexity of urban dynamics from a range of ethnographic vantage points, including the city's football clubs, the airport, housing estates, the Gay Village and the city's annual civic parade. These perspectives help trace the multiple dynamics of a vibrant and rapidly changing post-industrial city, showing how people's decisions and actions co-produce the city and give it shape. Using the metaphor of the kaleidoscope, with each turn of the wheel, another aspect of the city is materialised. In doing so, the contributors complicate the dominant narrative of Manchester's renaissance as driven by the city administration's entrepreneurial ethos. By taking up civic space and resources with council-led cultural representations focused largely on generating financial income for the city, three decades of command-and-control politics has inhibited grassroots and spontaneous forms of emergent publics.

    • Geography & the Environment
      June 2014

      Human-Environmental Interactions in Cities

      Challenges and Opportunities of Urban Land Use Planning and Green Infrastructure

      by Editor(s): Nadja Kabisch, Neele Larondelle, Angela Reeve, Martina Artmann

      This book addresses international research communities concerned with conceptual, scientific, and design approaches to urban land developments and biodiversity. The main focus is on the understanding of human-environment interactions analysed by multi-disciplinary approaches. The articles in this important collection include new concepts and challenges for sustainable green space development emerging from the pressure caused by urbanisation. The concept of biophilic urbanism and the framework of urban ecosystem services are introduced and referred to by applications in different case studies in Europe. Case studies also refer to the current challenges for biodiversity in different urban spaces. These spaces include the urban garden and school environments. Important human-species interactions are identified by analysing the allergenic potential of urban trees in a US city. Anthropogenic influences on the survival or local extinction of species are examined in a Mediterranean urban area. In all articles, the importance of urban planning on green infrastructure development, biodiversity conservation and management within the urban ecosystem is highlighted, and planning recommendations are given.

    • Urban & municipal planning
      May 2016

      Planting New Towns in Europe in the Interwar Years

      Experiments and Dreams for Future Societies

      by Editor(s): Helen Meller, Heleni Porfyriou

      The key theme of the papers in this book concerns the prospects of building new urban environments and creating new societies in Europe during the interwar years. The contributions do not focus on the system of government – communist, fascist or democratic – but, rather, on what actually got built, by whom and why; and how the international communication of ideas was filtered through the prism of local concerns and culture. As such, the volume serves to tease out connections between urban form and social aspirations, and between the moral basis of social planning and how it was interpreted. Did the new towns of the interwar years actually create a planned society where visions met realities, aided by the design of new urban forms? This is one of the principal questions investigated by the contributors here in all the different political contexts of their chosen ‘new towns’.

    • Food & Drink
      January 2013

      Market Place

      Food Quarters, Design and Urban Renewal in London

      by Author(s): Susan Parham

      This book is about designing for food. It explores three fast transforming urban sites in London, centred on the regenerating spaces of Borough, Broadway and Exmouth Markets. It suggests that ‘food quarters’ have emerged in each place, modelling new forms of interconnection between physical design and social processes in which food-related renewal is at the heart. Using case study research, informed by design, morphological and social science techniques, the book explores how the interplay between compact city design and social practices focused on food, strongly influences the making of everyday life in these places. It demonstrates that the quarters have at once enriched the experience of food and eating, and increased urban sustainability and conviviality in and around previously moribund food spaces, while paradoxically contributing to gentrification effects. The book frames this experience within more spatially dominant approaches to city design, which seem to close off convivial food options and choices that would support a more satisfying and resilient urban life. The book draws some conclusions about the complexities of designing and planning for food-led renewal that might apply more broadly to other places in London and potentially to other cities in future.

    • Architecture
      December 2013

      Cities to be Tamed? Spatial Investigations across the Urban South

      by Editor(s): Francesco Chiodelli, Beatrice De Carli, Maddalena Falletti, Lina Scavuzzo

      Across the global South, the rapid urbanisation and uneven development that have occurred over the past few decades have brought to the surface a tight connection between social conflicts and urban space. Indeed, the physical conformation of urban space is one of the primary factors that trigger social tensions, with repercussions at the metropolitan, regional and national scales. Such tensions are related to the conditions of social and spatial inequality which characterise many urban areas across the South; they can also be connected to contingent political and institutional orders which find in the materiality of space both the means and the cause of conflicts among different groups, amidst diverging territorial demands and the overlapping of competing struggles for power. At the same time, new possibilities arise in the concreteness of space, including innovative forms of local activism, adapting strategies of self-organisation, and unconventional relations between the ‘formal’ and the ‘informal’ city. On acknowledging the multifaceted nature of the urban space, there arises a question which constitutes the core problem addressed by the book: are cities to be tamed?This volume gathers a series of cross-disciplinary contributions on these topics, spanning from architecture and urban design, to planning, social theory and geography. These contributions revolve around two core themes. The first concerns the agency of design in contexts of ‘informality’ and centres on the missing/unexpected/pursued exchange between projects and realities. The second concerns the complex relationship between spatial planning, politics, and conflicts in contexts characterised by marked ethnic, political, and social tensions.Contributors: Alessandro Balducci, Scott A. Bollens, Jeffrey Chan Kok Hui, Francesco Chiodelli, Laure Criqui, Viviana d’Auria, Beatrice De Carli, Bruno De Meulder, Annalies De Nijs, Maddalena Falletti, Nabeel Hamdi, Joud M.I. Khasawneh, Hamed Khosravi, Olivier Legrand, Colin Marx, Carmen Mendoza-Arroyo, Lina Scavuzzo, Erez Tzfadia, Ignacio Castillo Ulloa, Faith Wong and Oren Yiftachel.

    • Interdisciplinary studies
      November 2014

      New Faces of Harbour Cities

      by Editor(s): Şebnem Gökçen Dündar, Neslihan Karataş, Hilmi Evren Erdin, Piotr Lorens

      New Faces of Harbour Cities explores the changing so-called “faces” of harbour cities. Whilst urban regeneration and harbour cities are discussed as related realms within the wider field of urban competitiveness, few studies have attempted to give place to the broader set of economic, social, legal, environmental and cultural dimensions of urban waterfront regeneration in harbour cities concerning not only Western and Northern Europe, but also Aegean and Mediterranean cities. The book provides a multi-disciplinary, yet holistic analysis of the port-city interface as a major goal of creating new domains of entrepreneurial activity. Offering noteworthy potential, the abandonment of port districts offers new opportunities in placing brownfield port areas back into public use through their comprehensive revitalization.With the rapid growth of special interest in the waterfront regeneration of port districts, many harbour cities in the world are making an effort to give their cities a brand new “face”. However, there are still specific cases showing that this goal may not always find success, as is discussed for various cities in this book. Key features of the book include a highly readable discussion of the relationship between urban waterfront regeneration and port cities that both address to the evolution of the port-city interface and contemporary patterns of activity. The book also includes a wide range of international case studies in both developed and developing cities, whilst providing a balanced view of the critical issues and related cases. While focusing on key themes, the discussion also considers the critique of issues such as risk management, legal challenges in planning and the balance between the need for logistic activities and brownfield regeneration of port districts as a major asset in terms of urban image. As such, New Faces of Harbour Cities will serve as an important reference to academic studies that explore key themes such as urban waterfront regeneration, brownfield development, the port-city interface, green energy, mixed-use regeneration, and legal aspects in planning.

    • Urban & municipal planning
      October 2013

      Public Space in Informal Settlements

      The Barrios of Bogotá

      by Author(s): Jaime Hernández-García

      Public Space in Informal Settlements: The Barrios of Bogotá contributes to the debate on informal settlements by viewing them as an opportunity to understand different ways of seeing and thinking about the city. Public spaces in informal settlements, like the housing stock, are to a large extent the product of local self-help and self-managed processes; however, the equivalent level of understanding has not been achieved, partly because such settlements are often seen as spare spaces with little value. Public spaces in informal settlements are public in terms of ownership and accessibility, but are communal in terms of use and attachment. They play an important role in the physical and social dynamics of the barrios, and have done since their inception; however, the improvement and consolidation of such spaces may not be realised for many years. The book will be of primary importance to architects, urban planners and researchers who are interested in the city in general, and in informal settlements in particular. The book will also be of interest to those in the humanities and social sciences who are concerned with politics and postcolonial studies, and to academics working in people–environment studies and in the relationship between people and place in terms of place self-building, place attachment and place identity. However, the volume will be of most interest for Latin Americanists who do not read Spanish or Portuguese, and would like to know more about the region, the problems and the views, from the perspective of an insider with extended knowledge of the field.

    • Landscape art & architecture
      July 2007

      Broadening Horizons

      Multidisciplinary Approaches to Landscape Study

      by Editor(s): Bart Ooghe and Geert Verhoeven

      ‘Broadening Horizons: multidisciplinary approaches to landscape study’ presents nine papers on physical landscape research in the Mediterranean and the Near East. Giving prime place to young researchers working in this field, it brings together highly diverse applications ranging from ground survey to semi-automated remote sensing, from cuneiform studies to palynology and from human geography to paradigm re-evaluation. Aimed at a public of both students and scholars with a shared interest in the study of past landscapes, its aims are dual. In presenting ongoing research which applies various techniques available to the student of landscape, it aims to add to the practice of these sub-fields. As such it may also provide a first insight into the particular methodologies addressed. In addition, by extending its gaze beyond geographical, temporal or disciplinary constraints, ‘Broadening Horizons’ addresses the need for a continued awareness of the many different methods and conceptualisations existing in this field. It hopes to illustrate some of the highly diverse ways in which to approach physical landscapes of the past and, by doing so, stress once again the value of continued cooperation between the many specialisations that make up this ever-expanding area of research."This is a very positive endeavour to improve cross-discipline awareness and collaboration. It is organised as a multi-facetted reader highlighting some of the wide ranging ways in which the past landscapes of the Mediterranean and Near East can be approached. It provides a significant contribution to the field of landscape research, and should prove of value to specialists and beginning researchers alike, both for its specific topics and its multidisciplinary approach."Professor Dr. M. Tanret, Head of the Dept. of Languages and Cultures of the Near East, Ghent University

    • Urban & municipal planning
      August 2007

      Past Matters

      Heritage and Planning History— Case Studies from the Pacific Rim

      by Editor(s): Caroline Miller and Michael Roche

      Past Matters brings together a group of largely Australian and New Zealand academics who in a series of case studies consider how planning concepts were adopted, adjusted, adapted and extended in a Pacific Rim setting. The early chapters explore the interplay between British and American planning models and local circumstances in Australia, Japan, and New Zealand. The main body of chapters recount difficulties faced by indigenous peoples with respect to housing needs and more generally re-asserting themselves in what began as colonial urban areas as well as others that look at community meanings, liberalism and exclusion on the street, and the power of sectional interests. The latter chapters also pose questions about urban heritage in terms of what and whose interests are at stake in these debates. The volume concludes with two convergent chapters that outline some practices by which ‘heritage’ of a more day to day suburban sort can be protected within a planning system. The collection centres on Australia and New Zealand but extends to include chapters on Canada and Japan. The viewpoints offered serve as a gentle reminder of the limitations of ‘Metropolitian Theory’.

    • Regional & area planning
      January 2012

      Urban Planning in the Middle East

      Case Studies

      by Author(s): John Yarwood

      This book describes diverse urban planning projects in Turkey, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates (Dubai and Sharjah) Kuwait, Afghanistan, Albania, Syria and Yemen. One thing in common between these countries is that the author has personally worked on all of these projects, and thus the book is a partial professional autobiography.Each chapter tackles not only a different country but also a different aspect of urban planning and development, as follows: upgrading or improving recent illegal or informal slums, including detailed local planning and strategic planning; urban conservation of Al Muharraq, a historic Gulf city; traditional building construction as a reference point for modern design; urban design of new city centre areas in three prosperous Gulf cities – Kuwait, Dubai and Sharjah; the recreation – post-war – of an urban planning system in Kabul; a historical account of urban planning in the Zog-Mussolini period in Albania, which is contrasted with the currently collapsed system; an account of urban economic regeneration in Syria; and local planning aiming at economic revival in Aden.These essays articulate eight themes: tradition versus modernism; regionalism and identity; the property market in the urban economy; privacy, the family/tribe etc.; arts and crafts, industrialised construction; the impact of the motor car, and urban infrastructure; the courtyard house; and public administration, local politics and corruption.The book will be of interest to urban and regional planners, infrastructure engineers, urban economists, architects, urban managers and local government experts as well as those with an interest in the region itself. The book will be useful as an academic textbook in the region, because it presents a wide range of views of the topic, and a wide spread of countries and backgrounds.

    • Architecture
      March 2015

      Unbounded

      On the Interior and Interiority

      by Editor(s): Dolly Daou, DJ Huppatz, Dinh Quoc Phuong

      In interior design, the definition and popular perception of the interior has long been concerned with bounded spaces, and with the relationship between private and public realms. However, two issues have challenged traditional boundaries between interior and exterior, and private and public: first, the emergence of new technological practices, and second, a broader understanding of diverse cultures. Popular perceptions of public and private space are currently being revised, and the interior is increasingly unbound in various ways, as many of the contributors to this volume (and the colloquium which preceded it) show. Both technological and cultural practices challenge and disrupt the common-sense idea of an interior space as a contained enclosure with clearly defined boundaries. Instead, the blurriness and ambiguity between public and private, inside and outside, and interiority and exteriority are challenging understandings of the interior.This book provides additional perspectives on the shifting understanding of the interior and its recent transformations through case studies of both real and “unreal” places. These include writings about the interiority of rooms, buildings, streets and cities with diverse social, cultural and political contexts, such as the transformation of Soviet-style living spaces in Hanoi and Bishkek; the appropriation of everyday spaces in Tokyo; the uses of fengshui in corporate office towers in Shanghai and Hong Kong; the exploration of urban boundaries in Beirut; and the relationship between making domestic spaces and urban planning practices in Guatemalan communities in Florida. This volume also features chapters on virtual spaces, including one that examines human interaction with spaces of virtual reality in the Vitthala Temple in India, and another that analyses the representation and development of modern interiors through popular tapestries from the 1920s and 1930s.

    • Architecture
      June 2013

      Urban Design

      Three Types of Continuity, Case Studies

      by Author(s): John Yarwood

      This book is about three different types of continuity from historic precedent to current practice in the field of urban planning and particularly that of urban design.The book begins by defining, describing and analyzing the three forms, which are:• Urban conservation,• Cultural tourism, and• Permanencies or Persistencies of Form.The book cites examples of each such case which the author worked on. (However, cases concerning (i) the Middle East and (ii) war, disaster and disintegration, were not included here, because the author’s last two books dwelt specifically upon them.)Amongst others, this book includes designs from the following towns:• Urban conservation: St Petersburg, Russia; Greifswald, Germany; Banska Stiavnica, Slovakia;• Cultural tourism: St Ann’s Bay, Jamaica;• Persistencies of Form: Telford; Thamesmead, London; Tampere, Finland; Silvertown Bridge, London; Herouville Saint Clair, Caen; Tete Defense, Paris.Numerous drawings, prepared by the author (for the greater part), are included in order to illustrate the points made by the text.

    • History
      January 2019

      Modern Rome

      From Napoleon to the Twenty-First Century

      by Editor(s): Lucia Bozzola, Roberto Einaudi, Marco Zumaglini

      After fifty years and fifteen editions and reprints in Italy, this classic, groundbreaking work in the field of historical urban studies is now published in English. A masterful, fluent narrative leads the reader through the last two centuries in the history of the Eternal City, capital of the Papal State, then of the united Italy, first under the monarchy and subsequently the republic. Rome’s chaotic growth and often ineffective urban planning, almost invariably overpowered by building speculation, can find an opportunity for future redemption in a vibrant multicultural society and the enhancement of an unequalled archaeological heritage with the ancient Appian Way as its spine. With respect to the last Italian edition of 2011, the volume is updated, enriched in text, indexes, maps and photographs. Historians, urban planners, architects, decision makers, university students, and anyone who is interested in one of the world’s most intriguing cities will enjoy this book.

    • Landscape art & architecture
      July 2007

      Broadening Horizons

      Multidisciplinary Approaches to Landscape Study

      by Editor(s): Bart Ooghe and Geert Verhoeven

      ‘Broadening Horizons: multidisciplinary approaches to landscape study’ presents nine papers on physical landscape research in the Mediterranean and the Near East. Giving prime place to young researchers working in this field, it brings together highly diverse applications ranging from ground survey to semi-automated remote sensing, from cuneiform studies to palynology and from human geography to paradigm re-evaluation. Aimed at a public of both students and scholars with a shared interest in the study of past landscapes, its aims are dual. In presenting ongoing research which applies various techniques available to the student of landscape, it aims to add to the practice of these sub-fields. As such it may also provide a first insight into the particular methodologies addressed. In addition, by extending its gaze beyond geographical, temporal or disciplinary constraints, ‘Broadening Horizons’ addresses the need for a continued awareness of the many different methods and conceptualisations existing in this field. It hopes to illustrate some of the highly diverse ways in which to approach physical landscapes of the past and, by doing so, stress once again the value of continued cooperation between the many specialisations that make up this ever-expanding area of research."This is a very positive endeavour to improve cross-discipline awareness and collaboration. It is organised as a multi-facetted reader highlighting some of the wide ranging ways in which the past landscapes of the Mediterranean and Near East can be approached. It provides a significant contribution to the field of landscape research, and should prove of value to specialists and beginning researchers alike, both for its specific topics and its multidisciplinary approach."Professor Dr. M. Tanret, Head of the Dept. of Languages and Cultures of the Near East, Ghent University

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