• Medicine

      The Psychedelic Traveller

      Short Stories

      by ANTHONY JAMES

      A collection of short stories from adventures and fantastic imaginings aroud the world. Each story is set in a different country, from Brazil to Siberia, from new Zealand to India. Each story is a cameo in itself, each one of a different mood, be it playful, or dark, of conflict or good humour. Stories will remind those who travel widely of the pitfalls and opportunities and remind all the readers that there is nothing more wonderful than this wonderful world and the ppeople in it.

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      Licensed larceny is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power? ;

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      Licensed larceny is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power? ;

    • Geography & the Environment
      January 2017

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      The growing wealth gap is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power?

    • Geography & the Environment
      June 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      The growing wealth gap is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power?

    • Business, Economics & Law
      February 2016

      Regional Economic Development in the Balkan Region

      by Editor(s): Teoman Duman, Merdžana Obralić, Erkan Ilgün, Uğur Ergun

      This edited volume brings together original scientific studies on current economic and developmental issues in the Balkan region, and is composed of papers by 25 authors from seven different countries. The Balkan region has gained significant interest in recent years due to its location and strategic position, representing a doorway to Europe, and the region’s stability and progress have direct consequences on various European countries. Because of this strategic position, there is currently much debate regarding a potential partnership of the Balkan states with the European Union.This book offers insights into the current economic and developmental status of the countries in this region, offering a series of chapters that analyse the area from a variety of perspectives. It begins with a discussion on the recent history of the region, especially with reference to the former Yugoslavia and its break-up after the turbulence experienced in 1990s. Other sections are complementary to each other in that they offer comparisons of the Balkan states in their economic progress at the micro and macro levels. Topics such as European integration policies and effects, economic transition, regional trade, tax incentive policy, regional capital markets, regional development agencies and systems, remittances and foreign aid contributions, import-export policies, fiscal policies, analysis of regional microfinance, and the tourism sectors are explored in detail throughout the book.

    • Social issues & processes
      December 2008

      Africa’s Finances

      The Contribution of Remittances

      by Editor(s): Raj Bardouille, Muna Ndulo and Margaret Grieco

      Globally, the volume of remittances to developing countries exceeds the development aid budgets. This volume explores the contribution of remittances to Africa’s finances and provides concrete guidelines as to how these may be expanded. It contains essays by the field leaders in this area which record, review and revise our knowledge base on Africa’s remittance patterns. The advent of new information communication technologies can contribute to an expanded capture of remittances from the African diaspora and in Africa new forms of money transfer are already taking shape which reflect this affordance. The volume also examines other resources, such as skills, that the African diaspora remits in its patterns of contact with Africa. The volume, shaped out of a conference on remittances and the African diaspora held at the Institute for African Development at Cornell University, is a timely reminder of the substantial role to be played in Africa’s development by Africans themselves.

    • Social issues & processes
      December 2008

      Africa’s Finances

      The Contribution of Remittances

      by Editor(s): Raj Bardouille, Muna Ndulo and Margaret Grieco

      Globally, the volume of remittances to developing countries exceeds the development aid budgets. This volume explores the contribution of remittances to Africa’s finances and provides concrete guidelines as to how these may be expanded. It contains essays by the field leaders in this area which record, review and revise our knowledge base on Africa’s remittance patterns. The advent of new information communication technologies can contribute to an expanded capture of remittances from the African diaspora and in Africa new forms of money transfer are already taking shape which reflect this affordance. The volume also examines other resources, such as skills, that the African diaspora remits in its patterns of contact with Africa. The volume, shaped out of a conference on remittances and the African diaspora held at the Institute for African Development at Cornell University, is a timely reminder of the substantial role to be played in Africa’s development by Africans themselves.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      February 2016

      Regional Economic Development in the Balkan Region

      by Editor(s): Teoman Duman, Merdžana Obralić, Erkan Ilgün, Uğur Ergun

      This edited volume brings together original scientific studies on current economic and developmental issues in the Balkan region, and is composed of papers by 25 authors from seven different countries. The Balkan region has gained significant interest in recent years due to its location and strategic position, representing a doorway to Europe, and the region’s stability and progress have direct consequences on various European countries. Because of this strategic position, there is currently much debate regarding a potential partnership of the Balkan states with the European Union.This book offers insights into the current economic and developmental status of the countries in this region, offering a series of chapters that analyse the area from a variety of perspectives. It begins with a discussion on the recent history of the region, especially with reference to the former Yugoslavia and its break-up after the turbulence experienced in 1990s. Other sections are complementary to each other in that they offer comparisons of the Balkan states in their economic progress at the micro and macro levels. Topics such as European integration policies and effects, economic transition, regional trade, tax incentive policy, regional capital markets, regional development agencies and systems, remittances and foreign aid contributions, import-export policies, fiscal policies, analysis of regional microfinance, and the tourism sectors are explored in detail throughout the book.

    • Economic geography
      October 2017

      Global Finance

      Places, Spaces and People

      by Hall, Sarah

      Drawing on economic geography, economic sociology and critical management studies, this is an interdisciplinary, student-focused exploration of the contemporary international financial environment.

    • Economic geography
      October 2017

      Global Finance

      Places, Spaces and People

      by Hall, Sarah

      Drawing on economic geography, economic sociology and critical management studies, this is an interdisciplinary, student-focused exploration of the contemporary international financial environment.

    • Geography & the Environment
      February 1991

      Measuring the Demand for Environmental Quality

      Open Workshop : Revised Papers

      by John B. Braden, C.D. Kolstad

      The theory and practice of measuring consumer demand for environmental quality is comprehensively and practically reviewed in this book. It was perceived that there was a significant need for a book that was both theoretically rigorous yet could address the question of how to actually measure this demand. The volume is divided into two sections. The first section develops theoretical tools and covers the principal methods for measuring demand for environmental goods. The second part of the book is concerned with implementing theory for specific classes of environmental effects.

    • Economic geography
      August 2003

      Remaking the Global Economy

      Economic-Geographical Perspectives

      by Peck, Jamie

      Remaking the Global Economy offers a state -of-the-art survey of geographical perspectives on the restructuring and reorganization of the global economy. With contributions from leading figures in the globalization debate, the book explores the latest thinking and research, as well as the enduring controversies, across a range of interrelated issues.

    • Economic geography
      July 2007

      Politics and Practice in Economic Geography

      by Tickell, Adam

      This is the first sustained discussion of methodological issues in economic geography in the last twenty years. It comprises an extended discussion of qualitative and ethnographic methods; an assessment of quantitative and numerical methods; an examination of post-structuralist and feminist methodologies; an overview of case-study approaches; and an inquiry into the relation between economic geography and other disciplines. With short, accessible, and engaging chapters, this is a critical assessment of qualitative and quantitative methods in economic geography.

    • Economic geography
      August 2003

      Alternative Economic Spaces

      by Leyshon, Andrew

      `A hopeful but nonetheless hard-hitting analysis of alternative economic spaces proliferating in the belly of the capitalist beast. In this book Leyshon, Lee and Williams convene fascinating studies of exchange, enterprise, credit and community. They invite us onto a new and promising discursive terrain where we can analyze, criticize and above all recognize actually existing economies of diversity in the wealthy countries of the West' - J K Gibson-Graham, Australian National University and University of Massachusetts, Amherst In the context of problems in the `new economy' - from dot.com start-ups, high-technology, and telecoms - Alternative Economic Spaces presents a critical evaluation of alternatives to the global economic mainstream. It focuses on the emergence of alternative economic geographies within developed economies and analyzes the emergence of alternative economic practices within industrialized countries. These include the creation of institutions like Local Exchange and Trading Systems, Credit Unions, and other social economy initiatives; and the development of alternative practices from informal work to the invention of consumption sites that act as alternatives to the monoply of the `big-box', multi-chain retail outlets. Alternative Economic Spaces is a reconsideration of what is meant by the `economic' in economic geography; its objective is to bring together some of the ways in which this is being undertaken. The volume shows how the `economic' is being rethought in economic geography by detailing new economic geographies as they are emerging in practice.

    • Economic geography
      December 2014

      Global Shift

      Mapping the Changing Contours of the World Economy

      by Dicken, Peter

      With over 120,000 copies sold worldwide, Peter Dicken's Global Shift has been the definitive work on economic globalization for almost 30 years now. A tried, trusted and unrivalled resource for undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers across the social sciences, this is a seminal text from an internationally renowned author.

    • Economic geography
      May 2016

      Financing Cities in India

      Municipal Reforms, Fiscal Accountability and Urban Infrastructure

      by Mohanty, Prasanna K

      Identifies the potential of cities as major drivers of economic growth and productive employment if municipal finances are managed better

    • Economic geography
      May 2016

      Financing Cities in India

      Municipal Reforms, Fiscal Accountability and Urban Infrastructure

      by Mohanty, Prasanna K

      Identifies the potential of cities as major drivers of economic growth and productive employment if municipal finances are managed better

    • Economic geography
      September 2004

      Kerala's Economic Development

      Performance and Problems in the Post-Liberalization Period

      by Prakash, B A

      The well-known 'Kerala model' of development has been the focus of discussion for the past several years and the first edition of this book, published in 1999, was a significant contribution to that debate. This revised edition focuses not so much on the more well-researched determinants of Kerala's success but on the hitherto ignored economic backwardness of the state, the economic reforms implemented since the early 1990s, the broad economic changes during the 1990s, and the economic problems and development issues facing Kerala today.

    • Economic geography
      August 2003

      Remaking the Global Economy

      Economic-Geographical Perspectives

      by Peck, Jamie; Yeung, Henry Wai-Chung;

      Remaking the Global Economy offers a state -of-the-art survey of geographical perspectives on the restructuring and reorganization of the global economy. With contributions from leading figures in the globalization debate, the book explores the latest thinking and research, as well as the enduring controversies, across a range of interrelated issues.

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