• Medicine

      The Psychedelic Traveller

      Short Stories

      by ANTHONY JAMES

      A collection of short stories from adventures and fantastic imaginings aroud the world. Each story is set in a different country, from Brazil to Siberia, from new Zealand to India. Each story is a cameo in itself, each one of a different mood, be it playful, or dark, of conflict or good humour. Stories will remind those who travel widely of the pitfalls and opportunities and remind all the readers that there is nothing more wonderful than this wonderful world and the ppeople in it.

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      Licensed larceny is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power? ;

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      Licensed larceny is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power? ;

    • Sociology & anthropology
      February 2017

      Environment, labour and capitalism at sea

      'Working the ground' in Scotland

      by Penny McCall Howard. Series edited by Alexander Smith

      This book explores how fishers make the sea productive through their labour, using technologies ranging from wooden boats to digital GPS plotters to create familiar places in a seemingly hostile environment. It shows how their lives are affected by capitalist forces in the markets they sell to, forces that shape even the relations between fishers on the same boat. Fishers frequently have to make impossible choices between safe seamanship and staying afloat economically, and the book describes the human impact of the high rate of deaths in the fishing industry. The book makes a unique contribution to understanding human-environment relations, examining the places fishers create and name at sea, as well as technologies and navigation practices. It combines phenomenology and political economy to offer new approaches for analyses of human-environment relations and technologies. It contributes to the social studies of fisheries through an analysis of how deeply fishing practices and social relations are shaped by political economy. It will be read in universities by social scientists and anthropologists and also by those with an interest in maritime Scotland.

    • Geography & the Environment
      January 2017

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      The growing wealth gap is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power?

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Revisiting Divisions of Labour

      The impacts and legacies of a modern sociological classic

      by Graham Crow, Jaimie Ellis

      Revisiting divisions of labour is a reflection on the making of a modern sociological classic text and its enduring influence on the discipline and beyond. Ray Pahl's 1984 book is distinctive in the sustained impact it has had on how sociologists think about, research and report on the changing nature of work and domestic life. In this timely revisiting of a landmark project, excerpts from the original are interspersed with contributions from leading researchers reflecting on the book and its effects in the ensuing three decades. The book will be of interest to researchers, students and lecturers in sociology and related disciplines.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Revisiting Divisions of Labour

      The impacts and legacies of a modern sociological classic

      by Graham Crow, Jaimie Ellis

      Revisiting divisions of labour is a reflection on the making of a modern sociological classic text and its enduring influence on the discipline and beyond. Ray Pahl's 1984 book is distinctive in the sustained impact it has had on how sociologists think about, research and report on the changing nature of work and domestic life. In this timely revisiting of a landmark project, excerpts from the original are interspersed with contributions from leading researchers reflecting on the book and its effects in the ensuing three decades. The book will be of interest to researchers, students and lecturers in sociology and related disciplines.

    • Geography & the Environment
      April 2017

      Migrating borders and moving times

      Temporality and the crossing of borders in Europe

      by Hastings Donnan, Madeleine Hurd, Carolin Leutloff-Grandits, Sarah Green, Hastings Donnan

      Migrating borders and moving timesanalyses migrant border crossings in relation to their everyday experiences of time and connects these to wider social and political structures. Sometimes border crossing takes no more than a moment; sometimes hours; some crossers find themselves in the limbo of detention; for others, the crossing lasts a lifetime to be interrupted only by death. Borders not only define separate spaces, but different temporalities. This book provides both a single interpretative frame and a novel approach to border crossing: an analysis of the reconfiguration of memory, personal and group time that follows the migrants' renegotiation of cross-border space and recalibrations of temporality.

    • Geography & the Environment
      April 2017

      Migrating borders and moving times

      Temporality and the crossing of borders in Europe

      by Hastings Donnan, Madeleine Hurd, Carolin Leutloff-Grandits, Sarah Green, Hastings Donnan

      Migrating borders and moving timesanalyses migrant border crossings in relation to their everyday experiences of time and connects these to wider social and political structures. Sometimes border crossing takes no more than a moment; sometimes hours; some crossers find themselves in the limbo of detention; for others, the crossing lasts a lifetime to be interrupted only by death. Borders not only define separate spaces, but different temporalities. This book provides both a single interpretative frame and a novel approach to border crossing: an analysis of the reconfiguration of memory, personal and group time that follows the migrants' renegotiation of cross-border space and recalibrations of temporality.

    • Geography & the Environment
      April 2017

      Migrating borders and moving times

      Temporality and the crossing of borders in Europe

      by Hastings Donnan, Madeleine Hurd, Carolin Leutloff-Grandits, Sarah Green, Hastings Donnan

      Migrating borders and moving timesanalyses migrant border crossings in relation to their everyday experiences of time and connects these to wider social and political structures. Sometimes border crossing takes no more than a moment; sometimes hours; some crossers find themselves in the limbo of detention; for others, the crossing lasts a lifetime to be interrupted only by death. Borders not only define separate spaces, but different temporalities. This book provides both a single interpretative frame and a novel approach to border crossing: an analysis of the reconfiguration of memory, personal and group time that follows the migrants' renegotiation of cross-border space and recalibrations of temporality.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Revisiting Divisions of Labour

      The impacts and legacies of a modern sociological classic

      by Graham Crow, Jaimie Ellis

      Revisiting divisions of labour is a reflection on the making of a modern sociological classic text and its enduring influence on the discipline and beyond. Ray Pahl's 1984 book is distinctive in the sustained impact it has had on how sociologists think about, research and report on the changing nature of work and domestic life. In this timely revisiting of a landmark project, excerpts from the original are interspersed with contributions from leading researchers reflecting on the book and its effects in the ensuing three decades. The book will be of interest to researchers, students and lecturers in sociology and related disciplines.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Revisiting Divisions of Labour

      The impacts and legacies of a modern sociological classic

      by Graham Crow, Jaimie Ellis

      Revisiting divisions of labour is a reflection on the making of a modern sociological classic text and its enduring influence on the discipline and beyond. Ray Pahl's 1984 book is distinctive in the sustained impact it has had on how sociologists think about, research and report on the changing nature of work and domestic life. In this timely revisiting of a landmark project, excerpts from the original are interspersed with contributions from leading researchers reflecting on the book and its effects in the ensuing three decades. The book will be of interest to researchers, students and lecturers in sociology and related disciplines.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Environment, labour and capitalism at sea

      'Working the ground' in Scotland

      by Penny McCall Howard, Alexander Smith

      This book explores how fishers make the sea productive through their labour, using technologies ranging from wooden boats to digital GPS plotters to create familiar places in a seemingly hostile environment. It shows how their lives are affected by capitalist forces in the markets they sell to, forces that shape even the relations between fishers on the same boat. Fishers frequently have to make impossible choices between safe seamanship and staying afloat economically, and the book describes the human impact of the high rate of deaths in the fishing industry. The book makes a unique contribution to understanding human-environment relations, examining the places fishers create and name at sea, as well as technologies and navigation practices. It combines phenomenology and political economy to offer new approaches for analyses of human-environment relations and technologies. It contributes to the social studies of fisheries through an analysis of how deeply fishing practices and social relations are shaped by political economy. It will be read in universities by social scientists and anthropologists and also by those with an interest in maritime Scotland.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Environment, labour and capitalism at sea

      'Working the ground' in Scotland

      by Penny McCall Howard, Alexander Smith

      This book explores how fishers make the sea productive through their labour, using technologies ranging from wooden boats to digital GPS plotters to create familiar places in a seemingly hostile environment. It shows how their lives are affected by capitalist forces in the markets they sell to, forces that shape even the relations between fishers on the same boat. Fishers frequently have to make impossible choices between safe seamanship and staying afloat economically, and the book describes the human impact of the high rate of deaths in the fishing industry. The book makes a unique contribution to understanding human-environment relations, examining the places fishers create and name at sea, as well as technologies and navigation practices. It combines phenomenology and political economy to offer new approaches for analyses of human-environment relations and technologies. It contributes to the social studies of fisheries through an analysis of how deeply fishing practices and social relations are shaped by political economy. It will be read in universities by social scientists and anthropologists and also by those with an interest in maritime Scotland.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      March 2017

      Security/Mobility

      Politics of movement

      by Matthias Leese, Stef Wittendorp, Peter Lawler, Emmanuel Pierre Guittet

      Mobility and security are key themes for students of international politics in a globalised world. This book brings together research on the political regulation of movement - its material enablers and constraints. It explores aspects of critical security studies and political geography in order to bridge the gap between disciplines that study global modernity, its politics and practices. The contributions to this book cover a broad range of topics that are bound together by their focus on both the politics and the material underpinnings of movement. The authors engage diverse themes such as internet infrastructure, the circulation of data, discourses of borders and bordering, bureaucracy, and citizenship, thereby identifying common themes of security and mobility today.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      December 2017

      Sustainable art communities

      Contemporary creativity and policy in the transnational Caribbean

      by Leon Wainwright, Kitty Zijlmans

      This collection sets out a range of perspectives on the challenges that the Caribbean is facing today, showing how the arts hold a crucial role in forging a more sustainable Caribbean community. It forcefully attests to the view that visual art in particular has a specific contribution to make and that this in turn means striving to foster a sustainable arts community that can contend with an environment of uneven infrastructure, opportunity and public awareness. Spanning the scholarly, artistic and professional fields of arts and heritage, this book compares two of the Caribbean's key linguistic regions - the Anglophone and the Dutch - to address the themes of global-local relations, capital, patronage, morality, contestation, sustainability and knowledge exchange. The result is a milestone of collaboration from diverse global settings of the Caribbean and its diaspora, including Jamaica, the Bahamas, Barbados, Suriname, Curaçao, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany and the United States.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2018

      The European Union and its eastern neighbourhood

      Europeanisation and its twenty-first-century contradictions

      by Mike Mannin, Paul Flenley, Nora Siklodi, Paul Flenley, Tatiana Romanova, Nadia Burenko, Teodor Lucian Moga, Marcin Kosienkowski, Monika Eriksen, Dimitris Tsarouhas, Martin Dangerfield, Edward Stoddard, Igor Merheim-Eyre, Maria Stoicheva, Kiryl Kascian, Adam Mickiewicz, Derek Averre, Kevork Oskanian

      This volume is timely in that it explores key issues which are currently at the forefront of the EU's relations with its eastern neighbours. It considers the impact of a more assertive Russia, the significance of Turkey, the limitations of the Eastern Partnership with Belarus and Moldova, the position of a Ukraine in crisis and pulled between Russia and the EU, security and democracy in the South Caucasus. It looks at the contested nature of European identity in areas such as the Balkans. In addition it looks at ways in which the EU's interests and values can be tested in sectors such as trade and migration. The interplay between values, identity and interests and their effect on the interpretation of europeanisation between the EU and its neighbours is a core theme of the volume.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2018

      The European Union and its eastern neighbourhood

      Europeanisation and its twenty-first-century contradictions

      by Mike Mannin, Paul Flenley, Nora Siklodi, Paul Flenley, Tatiana Romanova, Nadia Burenko, Teodor Lucian Moga, Marcin Kosienkowski, Monika Eriksen, Dimitris Tsarouhas, Martin Dangerfield, Edward Stoddard, Igor Merheim-Eyre, Maria Stoicheva, Kiryl Kascian, Adam Mickiewicz, Derek Averre, Kevork Oskanian

      Introduction Paul Flenley and Michael Mannin Part I: Concepts and Frameworks 1 Europeanisation as a past and present narrative Mike Mannin 2 Defining contemporary European identity/ies Nora Siklodi 3 The Limitations of the EU's strategies for Europeanisation of the neighbours Paul Flenley Part II: Country/Area Studies 4 Europeanisation and Russia Tatiana Romanova 5 'Bounded Europeanisation': the case of Ukraine Nadiia Bureiko and Teodor Lucian Moga 6 Belarus: Does Europeanisation require a geopolitical choice? Kiryl Kascian 7 Relations between Moldova and the European Union Kamil Calus and Marcin Kosienkowski 8 Value-oriented aspects of EU-isation: The case of the Balkans Monika Eriksen 9 Turkey: Identity politics and reticent Europeanisation Dimitris Tsarouhas Part III: Issues and Sectors 10 New Member States' economic relations with Russia: 'Europeanisation'or Bilateral Preferences? Martin Dangerfield 11 EU Energy Security Policy in the Eastern Neighbourhood: Towards Europeanisation? Edward Stoddard 12 The EU and the European Other: The Janus face of EU migration and visa policies in the neighbourhood Igor Merheim-Eyre 13 'Neighbour languages': Europeanisation and language borders Maria Stoicheva 14 Security and Democratisation: the case of the South Caucasus Kevork Oskanian and Derek Averre Conclusion Paul Flenley and Michael Mannin Bibliography Index

    • Geography & the Environment
      June 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      The growing wealth gap is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power?

    Subscribe to our newsletter