• Business, Economics & Law
      April 2018

      Safe Mobility

      Challenges, Methodology and Solutions

      by Dominique Lord, Simon Washington

      Safe mobility has a clear and transparent link to transport sustainability, as fatalities and injuries resulting from people engaged with transport networks worldwide is an increasing public health concern relative to other health threats worldwide. This volume on Safe Mobility provides current state of the knowledge across a multitude of analytical and context specific transport safety areas. It includes a comprehensive set of chapters authored by many of the world's leading experts in both behavioural and engineering aspects of safety mobility, providing a comprehensive view of the area. The book increases the level of knowledge on road safety contexts, issues and challenges; shares what can currently be done to address the variety of issues; and points to what needs to be done to make further gains in road safety.

    • Technology, Engineering & Agriculture
      June 2017

      Walking

      Connecting Sustainable Transport with Health

      by Corinne Mulley, Klaus Gebel, Ding Ding

      This book combines core chapters on different aspects of sustainable transport and health, together with case studies of particular approaches to synthesise walking and health in cities around the globe. Walking as a research area is multifaceted and this book presents chapters which synthesise the current state of research and practice, which will be of interest to readers, both academic and professional, and point to areas that will feature prominently in future research domains. Although the links between transport and health have long been recognised in the transport and health disciplines separately, it is a fairly recent phenomenon that they have been seen as a legitimate inter- and multi-disciplinary area. The areas of intersection have become more obvious with better understanding between the different disciplines with mutual and explicit understanding that great benefits come from recognising synergies between disciplinary approaches to similar problems. The connections between walking and health have benefited from a better understanding of the contributions of different disciplines. This book exploits this multidisciplinary approach.

    • Geography & the Environment
      March 2008

      Brownfields Redevelopment and the Quest for Sustainability

      by Christopher Sousa, Steven Tiesdell

      Concerns over urban blight, environmental degradation, climate change, inner-city unemployment, and a host of other socio-economic and environmental problems have forced policy makers, planners, and others interested in the future of our planet to take a closer look at ways to foster more sustainable urban development. Drawing on the author's extensive research, this book examines the role that brownfields redevelopment is playing and can play in our quest for sustainability, focusing primarily on efforts in the US and Canada to build better places for urban dwellers to live, work, and play. It commences by reviewing the nature and scope of the brownfields problem and puts it into a sustainability context, both theoretically and in terms of real costs and benefits. The book then looks at how brownfields are being used as spaces for developing an array of residential, recreational, and employment-oriented projects that have breathed new life into the urban environment. For a more sustainable future, however, the author argues that more still needs to be done to connect sustainability objectives and processes to redevelopment efforts. This is a study of the nature of urban brownfields redevelopment in North America over the last two decades. It outlines the reasons behind the emerging success of recent brownfields redevelopment. It critically examines how affected stakeholders have overcome the numerous challenges facing brownfields redevelopment.

    • Geography & the Environment
      February 2008

      Diverging Mobilities

      Devolution, Transport and Policy Innovation

      by Danny MacKinnon, Jon Shaw, Iain Docherty, Steven Tiesdell

      The British state has long been regarded as one of the most stable and centralised political structures in the world, and devolution represents one of the most significant changes to its fabric in 300 years. To date research on devolution in the UK has largely focused on core public policy areas such as health, economic development and social welfare. Work on transport has been somewhat limited, despite its increased policy prominence in recent years. This book presents a thorough academic investigation into the impact of devolution on the formulation and delivery of transport policy in the UK. Using detailed interviews with key policy makers, transport providers, business organisations and user groups, the authors draw upon concepts and ideas from across the social sciences to inform their analysis. The picture that emerges is distinctly mixed: there are elements of both convergence and divergence in the strategies and policies adopted by the devolved administrations, and marked variations in the overall performance of these administrations in transport are uncovered. Ultimately, though, devolution on its own is an insufficient basis for improved policy performance what matters is the generation of enough strategic capacity to promote real change for the better. This book presents a thorough academic investigation into the impact of devolution on the formulation and delivery of transport policy in the UK. The authors draw upon concepts and ideas from across the social sciences to inform their analysis by using detailed interviews with key policy makers, transport providers, business organisations and user groups.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      December 2004

      Environmental Policy, International Trade and Factor Markets

      by C.C. Chao, E. Siu-Hung Yu

      This book examines the intricate relationship among trade and investment policies, as well as environmental regulations, especially for developing economies. Trade liberalization via tariff reduction and market reforms has contributed significantly to the growth of the world economy. Nonetheless, one may wonder if free trade can continue to be a key factor sustaining economic growth and improving environmental quality. Under free trade, capital-abundant developed countries that produce capital intensive goods tend to emit more pollutants. This is the thrust of the so-called factor-endowment hypothesis of pollution. However, the costs of abating pollution are mounting in environmentally conscious nations due to the adoption of tougher environmental standards. The increased production costs have prompted firms in the developed nations to relocate to developing countries (the pollution haven hypothesis). Households in developing economies are mainly concerned with meeting basic needs and thus attach greater importance to issues about jobs and income. This book contributes toward understanding these issues. The impacts of pollution taxes and environmental standards on employment and social welfare are examined, the design and coordination of optimal trade, investment and environmental policies are analyzed, and their policy implications, such as aid-nature swap and backward incidence of pollution control, are provided. Finally, optimal trade and pollution policies are investigated and compared under certain and uncertain situations.

    • Geography & the Environment
      February 1991

      Measuring the Demand for Environmental Quality

      Open Workshop : Revised Papers

      by John B. Braden, C.D. Kolstad

      The theory and practice of measuring consumer demand for environmental quality is comprehensively and practically reviewed in this book. It was perceived that there was a significant need for a book that was both theoretically rigorous yet could address the question of how to actually measure this demand. The volume is divided into two sections. The first section develops theoretical tools and covers the principal methods for measuring demand for environmental goods. The second part of the book is concerned with implementing theory for specific classes of environmental effects.

    • Geography & the Environment
      March 2012

      Action Research for Sustainable Development in a Turbulent World

      by Ortrun Zuber-Skerritt

      This book presents and celebrates over 20 years of Action Learning and Action Research (ALAR) through stories, experiences, reflections and specific works of key proponents and participants in Action Learning and Action Research World Congresses. Authors discuss wide-ranging possibilities and argue for the benefits of action research for sustainable development and problem solving in a turbulent world in the 21st century. They practise what they preach: collaborative, participatory action research based on learning outcomes from projects, discussion and debate. All chapters argue for, justify and explain the need for a shift in approaches to learning and development - from technical, managerial and controlling, to emancipatory, critical, ethical and humanist approaches - to achieve sustainable and robust outcomes in a turbulent world. The book is the first to present action research as a solution to and integration of economic, social, philosophical and ecological systems for problem solving and sustainable development in this troubled world of the 21st century.

    • Geography & the Environment
      August 2012

      Beyond the Rural Urban Divide

      Cross-continental Perspectives on the Differentiated Countryside and Its Regulation

      by Kjell Andersson, Erland Eklund, Minna Lehtola, Terry Marsden

      The rural-urban dichotomy is one of the most influential figures of thought in history, laying the foundation for academic disciplines such as rural and urban sociology. The dichotomy rests on the assumption that rural and urban areas differ fundamentally. By the mid-twentieth century, scholars had observed that many rural areas displayed a blend of rural and urban features. Since then, counter urbanisation, urban sprawl and ever-increasing flows of people, goods and ideas between rural and urban areas have blurred the distinctions even further. Attempts to create new rural-urban classification systems, whether based on factors such as population size, density or distances, have largely failed. Clearly, new classification systems must use the meaning of observed changes in rural-urban systems as their point of departure rather than simple measurements of these changes. These meanings can, despite the interdependencies of our global world, be explored only in their political, cultural and economic settings.

    • Geography & the Environment
      February 2009

      Beyond the Rural Urban Divide

      Cross-continental Perspectives on the Differentiated Countryside and Its Regulation

      by Kjell Andersson, Erland Eklund, Minna Lehtola, Terry Marsden

      The rural-urban dichotomy is one of the most influential figures of thought in history, laying the foundation for academic disciplines such as rural and urban sociology. The dichotomy rests on the assumption that rural and urban areas differ fundamentally. By the mid-twentieth century, scholars had observed that many rural areas displayed a blend of rural and urban features. Since then, counter urbanisation, urban sprawl and ever-increasing flows of people, goods and ideas between rural and urban areas have blurred the distinctions even further. Attempts to create new rural-urban classification systems, whether based on factors such as population size, density or distances, have largely failed. Clearly, new classification systems must use the meaning of observed changes in rural-urban systems as their point of departure rather than simple measurements of these changes. These meanings can, despite the interdependencies of our global world, be explored only in their political, cultural and economic settings.

    • Geography & the Environment
      April 2015

      Beyond the UN Global Compact

      Institutions and regulations

      by Liam Leonard, Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez

      This book offers African, Asian, Latin American, European, and North American perspectives on institutions and regulations promoting sustainable economic growth in the post-2015 development agenda in areas such as environment, labour, risk management, corporate social responsibility, corporate governance, and innovation. The chapters address sustainability issues at the firm, national, regional and international levels from a multidisciplinary perspective. The chapters of this volume address the challenge of enhancing economic competitiveness of the supply side economies while pushing a sustainable development agenda. This work addresses the existing inequalities, environmental degradation, and economic/financial instability under current dynamics of international and domestic power relations in order to meet the set objectives for the post-2015 era. This volume advances the perspectives on the non-compulsory alternative to markets regulations, the United Nations Global Compact, explored in the previous volume 'The UN Global Compact: Fair Competition and Environmental and Labour Justice in International Markets' vol. 16.

    • Geography & the Environment
      April 2014

      Building Resilient Urban Communities

      by Jonas Joerin, Rajib Shaw, R. R. Krishnamurthy

      "How do urban communities in Asian cities experience the impacts of urbanisation and climate change? This book throws light on the ongoing processes of rapid urban transformation in many cities in developing countries, with particular reference to cities such as Chennai in India. Due to increasing demands on infrastructures and urban services, cities in developing countries are often pushed to the edge of collapse even when not in times of disaster. While such cities try to implement measures to safeguard the well-being of their citizens, looming impacts of climate change such as increasingly frequent and intense natural hazards pose new and additional challenges to their urban communities. This book connects critical issues relating to the general functioning of cities with climate-related disasters with the concept of resilience. Furthermore, this research takes a pro-solution stance, and demonstrates that individuals can form collective power to deliver added value before, during and after a disaster. The concept of resilience is applied to determine whether an urban community would be affected or damaged during a climate-related disaster, and to what extent."

    • Business, Economics & Law
      December 2011

      Business & Sustainability

      Concepts, Strategies and Changes

      by Gabriel Eweje, Martin Perry

      In recent years' research on business and sustainability, particular attention is being given to the motivations driving business managers to incorporate social and environmental strategies into their day-to-day business activities. Such research is critical to the evaluation of green management whether viewed from the perspective of academics, managers, policy makers or business students. This volume aims to assist readers to navigate the conceptual maze surrounding discussions of business and sustainability by offering critical reflection on the state of business action for environmental sustainability and providing evidence about what is actually taking place in real localities and businesses. The chapters in the volume are focusing on sustainability issues that are critical, topical, and needed at this stage of the discussion. The volume makes three main contributions. First, it offers a critical review of business engagement with sustainability from four perspectives: sustainability as a political project; sustainability as a response to environmental crisis, sustainability as business opportunity and sustainability as stakeholder management. Second, the volume examines actual experience in terms of the steps being taken by business and how these have affected business performance. Third, the volume provides case studies of individual organizations or institutions that reveal tensions and challenges to progressing sustainable business strategies and that offer insight into the prospects for changing the relationship of business to the environment.

    • Geography & the Environment
      March 2011

      Climate and Disaster Resilience in Cities

      by Rajib Shaw, Anshu Sharma, Rajib Shaw

      One of the emerging reasons for the current trend of increasing impacts of disasters is the unpredictability of natural hazard events coupled with the tendency of human settlements to move to vulnerable locations including coastal areas in search of economic gains. Urban areas are most affected due to concentration of habitat and resources. Whilst it is impossible to make resistant urban growth, resilience is becoming more widely accepted and urban systems must be resilient enough to cope with the climate related hazards. This book highlights the issues of resilience through regional, national, city and community-based studies. Contributions come from academia, city government networks, city managers, non-government organizations and international agencies like the World Bank and United Nations. Thus, the book reflects a unique aspect of multi-stakeholder perspective. It also highlights how to enhance actions at local levels, and how the plans can be implemented through multi-stakeholder collaboration. This is the first book to combine academic research and field practice on the urban risk reduction, especially focusing on the climate-related disasters in the Asian region.

    • Geography & the Environment
      December 2010

      Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction

      An Asian Perspective

      by Rajib Shaw, Juan Pulhin, Joy Pereira, Rajib Shaw

      Following on from Volume 4 in this series, which looked at issues and challenges with regard to Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), Volume 5 has a specific focus on Asia. Arguably among the regions of the world most vulnerable to climate change, Asia has different mechanisms for CCA and DRR activities. Synergies between DRR and CCA in this region are necessary not only to avoid duplicities and derive optimal benefits from scarce resources but also to add value to projects through lessons learnt from a variety of perspectives. This volume provides 19 case studies from 13 countries and regions in Asia. The case studies highlight different aspects of CCA-DRR entry points, such as policy interventions, drought risk management, coastal management, agro-forestry, lagoon management, livelihood issues and risk communication. A valuable aid to students and researchers in the field of disaster risk reduction, climate change, environmental studies and related risks, it provides a greater awareness on the current trend of research in the field also for practitioners and policy makers applying the collective knowledge into policy and decision making.

    • Geography & the Environment
      December 2010

      Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction

      Issues and Challenges

      by Rajib Shaw, Juan Pulhin, Joy Pereira, Rajib Shaw

      The importance of Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) is increasing due, in part, to recent major disasters throughout the world. CCA and DRR are closely associated and there has been significant awareness at global and national levels to make collective focus on CCA and DRR. Although there are several books on CCA, this is the first systematic academic publication to highlight the linkages between CCA and DRR, CCA-DRR synergy and interactions. The book is divided into four parts: Part 1 focuses on the theory of CCA and DRR and its enabling environment; Part 2 focuses on governance, education and technology as the framework of CCA-DRR linkage; Part 3 focuses on different entry points with chapters on urban, coast, mountain, river and housing; and Part 4 focuses on regional perspective of CCA and DRR looking at developing nations, south Asia, ASEAN and Small Island Developing States. Key issues and challenges related to the CCA and DRR are highlighted throughout, mostly drawing lessons and experiences from the field practices. This book gives researchers and practitioners greater awareness on the current trend of research in the field.

    • Geography & the Environment
      December 2016

      Climate Change and the 2030 Corporate Agenda for Sustainable Development

      by Liam Leonard, Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez

      This volume explores the meaning of the Paris Climate Agreement 2015 for business; it analyses its challenges and implications, and establishes required actions by the private sector in order to reduce global warming and mitigating climate change effects. We bring together evidence-based, conceptual and theoretical contributions from a diverse set of geographical locations, and disciplinary backgrounds on the meanings, implications, opportunities and challenges for business around the planet in relation to climate change.

    • Geography & the Environment
      June 2012

      Climate Change Modelling for Local Adaptation in the Hindu Kush - Himalayan Region

      by Armando Lamadrid, Ilan Kelman, Rajib Shaw

      This book presents a portrait of the social advantages and limitations of climate change related modeling in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region. Physical systems modeling - such as of climate, weather, water, and soil - can be useful planning tools, and are essential to the forecasts and projections used operationally for decisions on climate and development. However, these models and their limitations are rarely discussed in terms of how they are interpreted, misinterpreted, used, not used, needed and not needed by society at the local level for climate change adaptation. This publication addresses the implied but largely uncritiqued relationships between scientific modeling knowledge and local adaptation responses. It also presents theoretical perspectives on modeling and adaptation, supported by case studies of model use, non-use, interpretation and misinterpretation in the HKH region for application at the local level. It provides a critical angle into the value of modeling at multiple decision making scales in society, but focused on local needs. Case studies are presented from a variety of HKH countries, as defined by ICIMOD (which includes Bangladesh and Myanmar).

    • Geography & the Environment
      March 2012

      Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction

      by Rajib Shaw, Rajib Shaw

      Communities are at the core of disaster risk reduction (DRR), and community based approaches are getting increasing focus in national DRR plans. In the case of past disasters, communities were always the first responders, and took leading roles in the post disaster recovery. The roles of communities in pre-disaster preparedness are also very important. This is the first comprehensive book available on CBDRR (community based disaster risk reduction) which outlines both research and practice, citing field examples and research results. It provides an overview of the subject and looks at the role of governments, NGOs, academics and corporate sectors in community based disaster risk reduction. It proceeds to examine experiences from Asian and African countries, and concludes by looking ahead to the future perspective of CBDRR.

    • Geography & the Environment
      October 2011

      Community Campaigns for Sustainable Living

      Health, Waste & Protest in Civil Society

      by Liam Leonard

      This book is based on research and observations undertaken for the author's PhD thesis at the National University of Ireland, and represents a case study of national and regional campaigns against both the Irish state's Regional Waste Management Plans and the corporate sector's attempts to develop waste incinerators or dumps in various parts of Ireland. This book provides an in depth account of the mobilizing patterns and framing processes of community campaigns which emerged in the wake of the Irish state's introduction of regional plans for waste management, which included plans for municipal 'waste to energy' plants or incinerators. It is the only book with a sole focus on this aspect of Irish society during the 'Celtic Tiger' boom which preceded the current economic downturn, and examines policy, population, development social issues and local and national electoral processes in detail at a time of immense change in the Republic of Ireland. As such, it provides a salient insight into the societal shifts which provide opportunities for social movements to oppose state or corporate plans which may be perceived to have human health or environmental risks associated with them.

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2012

      Cycling and Sustainability

      by John Parkin, Stephen Ison, Jon Shaw

      This book explores the reasons for difficulties in making cycling mainstream in many cultures, despite its claims for being one of the most sustainable forms of transport. In conditions of relatively low use, cycle users become more closely identified with their means of transport than users of other modes. Such personality-based considerations led to the need initially for the book to explore the cultural development of cycling in countries with high use and the differences in use between different sub-groups of the population. After a consideration of the possible role and function of the private sector, the lessons learned from the book are placed in a socio-political context with a call for required action to create a revolution in cycle use.

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