• Geography & the Environment

      Science and Hope

      a Forest History

      by John Dargavel and Elisabeth Johann

      A HISTORY OF THE SCIENCE AND IDEAS OF FORESTRY OVER THE PAST THREE CENTURIES This book tells the story of the hopeful science and trusting art of forestry. It is a story about the hopes of foresters and other scientists to understand the forests more deeply, and about their unspoken trust that their knowledge could ensure an enduring sylvan future. Much has been written on the origins and development of modern forestry in various countries, and on the people and institutions involved, but there is little in the forest history literature that explains what the science actually is. Forest knowledge has an ancient history documented since classical times and applied within the intricate social and legal systems of medieval Europe. This volume is concerned with the modern form of forest science, founded in Europe early in the nineteenth century, when regimes for managing the forests that could be traced to the ancient world and had flourished in the Middle Ages were disrupted. New ways had to be found. Foresters have tried to know their forests scientifically for over three centuries and have hoped to apply their knowledge to good effect, even though they could not live to see the futures they envisioned. How far did their scientific understanding enable a sylvan future? What, over the three centuries discussed in this book, were their successes and failures? And now what might the future hold for forest science and its application? This is no tale of triumph: the outlook for the world’s forests is too bleak for that. While many forests are flourishing, the climate is changing, tropical forests are disappearing, others are degrading, species are being lost, governments dither, international conferences fail. This is another, longer story – one of inquiry, of science and persistent endeavour to find a better future for the forests.

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      British Urban Trees

      A Social and Cultural History c.1800–1914

      by Paul A. Elliott

      GREENING THE VICTORIAN URBAN WORLD Whether we consider the great London Planes which are now the largest trees in many British urban streets, the exotic ornamentals from across the globe flourishing in numerous private gardens, the stately trees of public parks and squares or the dense colourful foliage of suburbia, the impact of trees and arboriculture upon modern towns and their ecosystems is clear. From the formal walks and squares of the Georgian town to Victorian tree-lined boulevards and commemorative oaks, trees are the organic statuary of modern urban society, providing continuity yet constantly changing through the day and over the seasons. Interfacing between humans and nature, connecting the continents and reaching back and forward through time to past and future generations, they have come to define urbanity while simultaneously evoking nature and the countryside. This book is the first major study of British urban arboriculture between 1800 and 1914 and draws upon fresh approaches in geographical, urban and environmental history. It makes a major contribution to our understanding of where, how and why trees grew in British towns in the period, the social and cultural impact of these and the attitudes taken towards them.

    • Geography & the Environment
      June 2014

      Eco-History

      An Introduction to Biodiversity and Conservation

      by Ian Rotherham

      AN ACCESSIBLE INTRODUCTION TO BIODIVERSITY, CONSERVATION AND THE ECO-CULTURAL NATURE OF LANDSCAPES Key issues are addressed in short, focused chapters, supported by a detailed thousand-year timeline based on the British Isles. Rotherham is convinced that to conserve wildlife or ecology, and to heal the wounds of human impacts, we must understand our own history and how, over countless centuries, we have forged today’s ecologies from our impacts on, and utilisation of, nature. He argues that the interlinked concepts of biodiversity, nature conservation and of sustainability are too often mixed with notions of ‘wilderness’ and ‘nature’ and ‘naturalness’. Much of the biodiversity that we hope to conserve is the result of long-term interactions between people and nature. It is a ‘cultural ecology’, the product of the environment, history and tradition. Recognising that the landscapes around us are ‘eco-cultural’ not ‘natural’ is, Rotherham suggests, the key to understanding contemporary biodiversity and major challenges for ideas of future conservation and sustainability. The book introduces the background to humanity’s interactions with Nature and the forces at work in shaping today’s world. It is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand the nature of the global environmental crisis and how we got here. In particular, it will be a stimulating guide to students and teachers or lecturers from sixth form and college to university. It will also appeal to the ordinary wildlife enthusiast wishing understand the past, and to gain insight into what might be in store for the future.

    • Geography & the Environment
      April 2009

      The Charm of Folk Customs

      by Hong Jiang

      This volume gives an authentic introduction and brief explanation of Chinese folklore and customs from such aspects as mascots, zodiac, folk deities, birthday customs, traditional wedding and funeral ceremonies.

    • Technology, Engineering & Agriculture
      September 2018

      Environmental Engineering

      Basic Principles

      by Vesna Tomašić, Bruno Zelić, Anita Šalić, Ivančica Ternjej, Zlatko Mihaljević, Tomislav Bolanča, Šime Ukić, Mirjana Novak Stankov, Felicita Briški, Marija Vuković Domanovac, Zoran Nakić, Marta Mileusnić, Krešimir Pavlić, Zoran Kovač, Aleksandra Sander, Jasna Prlić Kardum, Gordana Matijašić, Krunoslav Žižek, Karolina Maduna, Danijela Ašperger, Davor Dolar, Krešimir Košutić, Hrvoje Kušić, Ana Lončarić Božić, Ivica Kisić, Željka Zgorelec, Aleksandra Percin, Ana Jurinjak Tušek

      Environmental Engineering provides a profound introduction to Ecology, Chemistry, Microbiology, Geology and Hydrology engineering. The authors explain transport phenomena, air pollution control, waste water management and soil treatment to address the issue of energy preservation, production asset and control of waste from human and animal activities. Modeling of environmental processes and risk assessment conclude the interdisciplinary approach.

    • Science & Mathematics
      May 2018

      Environmental Toxicology

      by Luis M. Botana, Natalia Vilarino, Ines Rodríguez, Amparo Alfonso, Carmen Alfonso, Alvaro Antelo, M. Carmen Louzao, Paula Abal, Carmen Vale González, Andrea Boente Juncal, Aida González Méndez, Eva Alonso, Rebeca Alvarino, Eva Cagide, Mercedes Álvarez, Maria J. Sainz, Jesús M. González-Jartín, Olga Aguín, J. Pedro Mansilla, Ana M. Botana

      Organic and inorganic chemicals frequently exhibit toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic, or sensitizing properties when getting in contact with the environment. This comprehensive introduction discusses risk assessment and analysis, environmental fate, transport, and breakdown pathways of chemicals, as well as methods for prevention and procedures for decontamination.

    • Geography & the Environment
      April 2018

      Sustainable Process Integration and Intensification

      Saving Energy, Water and Resources

      by Jirí Jaromír Klemeš, Petar Sabev Varbanov, Sharifah Rafidah Wan Alwi, Zainuddin Abdul Manan

      In its second edition, Sustainable Process Integration and Intensification continues the presentation of fundamentals of key areas of both fields. Thoroughly updated and extended to include the latest developments, the reader also finds illustrated working sessions for deeper understanding of the taught materials.The book is addressed to graduate students as well as professionals to help the effectively application in plant design and operation.

    • The Arts
      September 2018

      The Architecture under King Ludwig II – Palaces and Factories

      by Andres Lepik, Katrin Bäumler

      Ludwig II of Bavaria (1864—1886) is more internationally known for his royal palaces than hardly any other regent of the 19th century. They are the symbol of a personal architectural vision which, to this day, fascinates people from all over the world. However, the fame of his palaces has eclipsed other construction activities in the Kingdom of Bavaria: urban developments, hospitals, and schools, theatres and museums, but also factories, railway stations, apartment blocks, churches, and synagogues were created under his regency. This book, for the first time, sheds light on the broad architectural activities in this epoch. Essays and overview illustrations of the building projects of the time provide insights into the diversity of the then building culture and, at the same time, open up a new perspective on the royal palaces.

    • Geography & the Environment
      2018

      The Rise and Fall of the Emerald Tigers

      Ten Years of Research in Panna National Park

      by Raghu Chundawat

      ‘This book is a must-read for everything you ever wanted to know about wild tigers in India.’—Valmik Thapar In this seminal book about the Indian tiger, Raghu Chundawat, a renowned conservation biologist, shares his findings from the only long-term ecological research project on tigers undertaken in India till date. Chundawat closely studied the Panna tigers and their prey, from 1996 to 2006—meticulously recording their space use, movements, feeding and reproductive behaviours—in the dry tropical forests of Madhya Pradesh. With support from the national park management, he oversaw a spectacular revival of Panna’s tiger population. However, by 2002-03, the fortunes of Panna’s tigers, and Chundawat’s research, nosedived when the park management changed. Monitoring privileges and access to the park were curtailed, and subsequently, poaching and poisoning of tigers spiked. When Chundawat blew the whistle on the alarming decline, he faced immense backlash from the state wildlife authorities. Despite the systemic opposition, Chundawat continued the fight to save Panna’s tigers, collecting data and petitioning the government to intervene. In this immensely informative work, Chundawat presents not just his research, but also an insider’s account of the politics and administrative apathy plaguing Indian wildlife conservation. He discusses the larger threats to Indian wildlife—and the possible solutions. Filled with stunning photographs, The Rise and Fall of the Emerald Tigers is a must-read for all wildlife enthusiasts and researchers across the world.

    • Geography & the Environment
      July 2011

      Conservation Song

      A History of Peasant-State Relations and the Environment in Malawi, 1860-2000

      by Wapulumuka Oliver Mulwafu

      Conservation Song explores ways in which colonial relations shaped meanings and conflicts over environmental control and management in Malawi. By focusing on soil conservation, which required an integrated approach to the use and management of such natural resources as land, water and forestry, it examines the origins and effects of policies and their legacies in the post-colonial era. That interrelationship has fundamental contemporary significance and is not simply a phenomenon created in the colonial period. For instance, like other countries in the region, post-colonial Malawi has been bedevilled by increasing rates of environmental degradation due, in part, to the expansion of human and animal populations, cash crop production, drought and consequent deforestation. These issues are as critical today as they were six or seven decades ago. In fact, they are part of a conservation song that has a long and complex history. The song of conservation was initially composed and performed in the colonial period, modified during the immediate postcolonial period and further refashioned in the post-dictatorship period to suit the evolving political climate; but the basic lyrics remain essentially the same. This book attempts to explain the evolution of the conservationist idea whilst demonstrating changes and continuities in peasant-state relations under different political systems.The dominant narrative posits conservation as a progressive movement aimed at re-organising natural resources and protecting them from destruction but the idea was contested and deeply embedded in colonial power relations and scientific ethos. Conservation emerged as an important tool of colonial state intervention and control concerning people and scarce resources. Conservation Song shows how the idea of conservation was rooted in and driven by a particular type of science about the organisation of space and landscapes. It offers a strategic entry point to understanding the historical roots of Africa's social and ecological problems over time, which are also intertwined with power and poverty relationships. In the postcolonial period, the conservation tempo subsided and became neglected in public discourse, only to re-emerge in the 1990s through the democratisation movement.

    • Geography & the Environment
      March 2012

      Changing Deserts

      Integrating People and their Environment

      by Troy Sternberg, Lisa Mol

      Deserts – vast, empty places where time appears to stand still. The very word conjures images of endless seas of sand, blistering heat and a virtual absence of life. However, deserts encompass a large variety of landscapes and life beyond oury stereotypes. As well as magnificent Saharan dunes under blazing sun, the desert concept encompasses the intensely cold winters of the Gobi, the snow-covered expanse of Antarctica and the rock-strewn drylands of Pakistan. Deserts are environments in perpetual flux and home to peoples as diverse as their surroundings, peoples who grapple with a broad spectrum of cultural, political and environmental issues as they wrest livelihoods from marginal lands. The cultures, environments and histories of deserts, while fundamentally entangled, are rarely studied as part of a network. To bring different disciplines together, the 1st Oxford Interdisciplinary Deserts Conference in March 2010 brought together a wide range of researchers from backgrounds as varied as physics, history, archaeology anthropology, geology and geography. This volume draws on the diversity of papers presented to give an overview of current research in deserts and drylands. Readers are invited to explore the wide range of desert environments and peoples and the ever-evolving challenges they face.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2016

      French colonial Dakar

      The morphogenesis of an African regional capital

      by Liora Bigon, Andrew Thompson, John Mackenzie

      This volume explores the planning and architectural cultures that shaped the model space of French colonial Dakar, a prominent city in West Africa. With a focus on the period from the establishment of the city in the mid-nineteenth century until the interwar years, the book reveals a variety of urban politics, policies and practices, and complex negotiations on both the physical and conceptual levels. Chronicling the design of Dakar as a regional capital, the book suggests a connection between the French colonial doctrines of assimilation and association, and French colonial planning and architectural policies in sub-Saharan Africa. Of interest to scholars in history, geography, architecture, urban planning, African studies and Global South studies, the book incorporates both primary and secondary sources collected from multilateral channels in Europe and Senegal. ;

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      Licensed larceny is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power? ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2015

      Rocks of nation

      The imagination of Celtic Cornwall

      by Shelley Trower

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      Licensed larceny is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power? ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2015

      Rocks of nation

      The imagination of Celtic Cornwall

      by Shelley Trower

    • Geography & the Environment

      Y Barcud

      The Red Kite

      by David Jones

    • Geography & the Environment

      Blwyddyn Fan Hyn a Fan Draw

      by Iolo Williams

      The diary of Iolo Williams, one of Wales' most renowned nature and wildlife presenters, during a busy 2010 when he travelled the length and breadth of Wales and spent a period in America living with indigenous tribes. The volume provides an opportunity to get to know this very likeable character.

    • Geography & the Environment

      Bugail Eryri

      Pedwar Tymor Ar Ffermydd Mynydd Yng Ngogledd Cymru

      by Keith Bowen

    • Geography & the Environment

      Eradicating Ecocide

      Laws and Governance to Prevent the Destruction of Our Planet

      by Polly Higgins

      Eradicating Ecocide highlights the need for enforceable, legally binding mechanisms in national and international law to hold to account perpetrators of long term severe damage to the environment. At this critical juncture in history it is vital that we set global standards of accountability for corporations, in order to put an end to the culture of impunity and double standards that pervade the international legal system. Higgins advocates the introduction of a new international law, Ecocide: ‘damage, destruction to or loss of ecosystems’, as the 5th Crime Against Peace. This would hold to account heads of corporate bodies that are found guilty of damaging the environment; it would present corporations with a new choice: they could choose to be part of the solution, part of the salvation of the planet’s future, by complying with the new law of Ecocide. The opportunity to implement this law represents a crossroads in the fate of humanity; we can accept the change, or we can continue to allow its destruction, risking future brutal war over disappearing natural resources.This is the first book to explain that we all have a commanding voice and the power to call upon all our governments to change the existing rules of the game.Higgins presents examples of laws in other countries which have succeeded in curtailing the power of governments, corporations and banks and made a quick and effective change, demonstrating that her proposal is not impossible. Eradicating Ecocide is a crash course on what laws work, what doesn’t and what else is needed to prevent the imminent disaster of global collapse.Eradicating Ecocide provides a comprehensive overview of what needs to be done in order to prevent ecocide. It is a book providing a template of a body of laws for all governments to implement, which applies equally to smaller communities and anyone who is involved in decision-making. --- The author is becoming a world figure in promoting the idea that ecocide should become an international crime like genocide. Here is a link to a talk she gave recently in Vienna, suggesting that a German language edition might be a prospect. ERDgespräche//EARTHtalks 2013: Polly Higgins on Vimeo.

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