• Business, Economics & Law
      March 2019

      I, Robot – I, Care

      Möglichkeiten und Grenzen neuer Technologien in der Pflege

      by Claudia Hauck, Charlotte Uzarewicz

      Technik ist aus der Pflege nicht wegzudenken. Mit Pflege 4.0 werden ganz neue Dimensionen im Verhältnis zwischen Mensch und Maschine vorstellbar. Besonders die Pflegewissenschaft ist hier gefordert, Stellung zu beziehen und den Diskurs kritisch mitzuentwickeln. In diesem Sammelband wird der aktuelle Stand der technologischen Entwicklung in der Pflege dargestellt und deren Nutzen für die pflegerische Arbeit an ausgewählten Beispielen verdeutlicht. Dabei entstehen grundlegende Fragen in Bezug auf das, was den Kern von Care betrifft: Wer sorgt sich um wen, wenn sich alles um neue Technologien dreht? Hilft Technik, den Kern von Care zu finden? Und ganz grundsätzlich: Wie wird sich das Verhältnis von Mensch und Maschine in Zukunft verändern? Das Buch gibt interessante Einblicke in spezifische und innovative Anwendungsfelder und bietet Argumentationsgrundlagen, wenn es um politische oder ökonomische Entscheidungsfindung geht.

    • History of medicine

      No One Ailing Except a Physician

      Medicine in the Mining West, 1848-1919

      by Duane A. Smith, Ronald C. Brown

      From burying scurvy victims up to their necks in the earth to drinking kerosene mixed with sugar to treat influenza, mid-nineteenth century medicine in the mining communities of the West usually consisted of home remedies that were often remarkable for their inventiveness but tragically random in their effectiveness. Only as a desperate last resort would people turn to the medical community, which had developed a deplorable reputation for quackery and charlatanism because of its lack of licensing regulations and uniform educational standards. No One Ailing Except a Physician takes readers back to those free-wheeling days in the mining towns and the dark recesses of the mines themselves, a time when illness or injury was usually survived more due to sheer luck than the interventions of medicine. This book is a must for both mining and medical historians, as well as the general reader interested in the history of the American West.

    • History of medicine

      Dolycwrt

      The Days of a Country Doctor's Surgery

      by

    • Complementary medicine
      December 1994

      A Hanging Chart of Simplified Taiji Quan

      by Wang Fu

      Chinese Wushu

    • Popular medicine & health

      A Brief History of Bad Medicine

      by Robert Youngson and Ian Schott

      A doctor removes the normal, healthy side of a patient's brain instead of the malignant tumor. A man whose leg is scheduled for amputation wakes up to find his healthy leg removed. These recent examples are part of a history of medical disasters and embarrassments as old as the profession itself.In Brief History of Bad Medicine, Robert M. Youngson and Ian Schott have written the definitive account of medical mishap in modern and not-so- modern times. From famous quacks to curious forms of sexual healing, from blunders with the brain to drugs worse than the diseases they are intended to treat, the book reveals shamefully dangerous doctors, human guinea pigs, and the legendary surgeon who was himself a craven morphine addict.Exploring the line between the comical and the tragic, the honest mistake and the intentional crime, Brief History of Bad Medicine illustrates once and for all that you can't always trust the people in white coats.

    • Biography: general

      Doctors and Discoveries

      Lives That Created Today's Medicine

      by John Galbraith Simmons

    • History of medicine
      October 2009

      Hermaphroditism, Medical Science and Sexual Identity in Spain, 1850 – 1960

      by Richard Cleminson (Author), Francisco Vázquez García (Author),

      This is the first book in English to analyse the medical category of ‘hermaphroditism’ in Spain over the period 1850-1960. It attempts to show how the relationship between the male and female body, biological ‘sex’, gender and sexuality constantly changed in the light of emerging medical, legal and social influences. Tracing the evolution of the hermaphrodite from its association with the ‘marvellous’ to the association with intersexuality and transexuality, this book emphasizes how the frameworks employed by scientists and doctors reflected not only changing international paradigms with respect to ‘hermaphrodite science’ but also social anxieties about shifting gender roles, the evolving discourse on sexuality and, in particular, the increased visibility of the ‘sexual deviancies’ such as homosexuality and changing legislation on marriage and divorce. Finally, we hope to open a space whereby the voice of ‘hermaphrodites’ and ‘intersexuals’ themselves could be heard in the past as agents in the construction of their own destiny as figures deemed ‘in-between’ by medicine and society.

    • History of medicine
      January 2016

      Work, psychiatry and society, c. 1750–2015

      by Edited by Waltraud Ernst

      This book offers the first systematic critical appraisal of the uses of work and work therapy in psychiatric institutions across the globe, from the late eighteenth to the end of the twentieth century. Contributors explore the daily routine in psychiatric institutions and ask whether work was therapy, part of a regime of punishment or a means of exploiting free labour. By focusing on mental patients' day-to-day life in closed institutions, the authors fill a gap in the history of psychiatric regimes. The geographical scope is wide, ranging from Northern America to Japan, India and Western as well as Eastern Europe, and the authors engage with broad historical questions, such as the impact of colonialism and communism and the effect of the World Wars. The book presents an alternative history of the emergence of occupational therapy and will be of interest not only to academics in the fields of history and sociology but also to health professionals.

    • History of medicine
      December 2015

      Framing the moron

      The social construction of feeble-mindedness in the American eugenic era

      by Gerald V. O'Brien

      Many people are shocked upon discovering that tens of thousands of innocent persons in the United States were involuntarily sterilized, forced into institutions, and otherwise maltreated within the course of the eugenic movement (1900-30). Such social control efforts are easier to understand when we consider the variety of dehumanizing and fear-inducing rhetoric propagandists invoke to frame their potential victims. This book, now available in paperback, details the major rhetorical themes employed within the context of eugenic propaganda, drawing largely on original sources of the period. Early in the twentieth century the term 'moron' was developed to describe the primary targets of eugenic control. This book demonstrates how the image of moronity in the United States was shaped by eugenicists. This book will be of interest not only to disability and eugenics scholars and historians, but to anyone who wants to explore the means by which pejorative metaphors are used to support social control efforts against vulnerable community groups.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      One hundred years of wartime nursing practices, 1854–1953

      by Edited by Jane Brooks and Christine Hallett

      This book examines the work that nurses of many differing nations undertook during the Crimean War, the Boer War, the Spanish Civil War, both World Wars and the Korean War. It makes an excellent and timely contribution to the growing discipline of nursing wartime work. In its exploration of multiple nursing roles during the wars, it considers the responsiveness of nursing work, as crisis scenarios gave rise to improvisation and the - sometimes quite dramatic - breaking of practice boundaries. The originality of the text lies not only in the breadth of wartime practices considered, but also the international scope of both the contributors and the nurses they consider. It will therefore appeal to academics and students in the history of nursing and war, nursing work and the history of medicine and war from across the globe.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      One hundred years of wartime nursing practices, 1854–1953

      by Edited by Jane Brooks and Christine Hallett

      This book examines the work that nurses of many differing nations undertook during the Crimean War, the Boer War, the Spanish Civil War, both World Wars and the Korean War. It makes an excellent and timely contribution to the growing discipline of nursing wartime work. In its exploration of multiple nursing roles during the wars, it considers the responsiveness of nursing work, as crisis scenarios gave rise to improvisation and the - sometimes quite dramatic - breaking of practice boundaries. The originality of the text lies not only in the breadth of wartime practices considered, but also the international scope of both the contributors and the nurses they consider. It will therefore appeal to academics and students in the history of nursing and war, nursing work and the history of medicine and war from across the globe.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      The making of British bioethics

      by Duncan Wilson

      The making of British bioethics provides the first in-depth study of how philosophers, lawyers and other 'outsiders' came to play a major role in discussing and helping to regulate issues that used to be left to doctors and scientists. It details how British bioethics emerged thanks to a dynamic interplay between sociopolitical concerns and the aims of specific professional groups and individuals who helped create the demand for outside involvement and transformed themselves into influential 'ethics experts'. Highlighting this interplay helps us appreciate how issues such as embryo research and assisted dying became high-profile 'bioethical' concerns in the late twentieth century, and why different groups now play a critical role in developing regulatory standards and leading public debates. The book draws on a wide range of original sources and will be of interest to historians of medicine and science, general historians and bioethicists.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      The making of British bioethics

      by Duncan Wilson

      The making of British bioethics provides the first in-depth study of how philosophers, lawyers and other 'outsiders' came to play a major role in discussing and helping to regulate issues that used to be left to doctors and scientists. It details how British bioethics emerged thanks to a dynamic interplay between sociopolitical concerns and the aims of specific professional groups and individuals who helped create the demand for outside involvement and transformed themselves into influential 'ethics experts'. Highlighting this interplay helps us appreciate how issues such as embryo research and assisted dying became high-profile 'bioethical' concerns in the late twentieth century, and why different groups now play a critical role in developing regulatory standards and leading public debates. The book draws on a wide range of original sources and will be of interest to historians of medicine and science, general historians and bioethicists.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      Who cared for the carers?

      A history of the occupational health of nurses, 1880–1948

      by Debbie Palmer

      This book compares the histories of psychiatric and voluntary hospital nurses' health from the rise of the professional nurse in 1880 to the advent of the National Health Service in 1948. In the process it reveals the ways national ideas about the organisation of nursing impacted on the lives of ordinary nurses. It explains why the management of nurses' health changed over time and between places, and sets these changes within a wider context of social, political and economic history. Today, high rates of sickness absence in the nursing profession attract increasing criticism. Nurses took more days off sick in 2011 than private sector employees and most other groups of public sector workers. This book argues that the roots of today's problems are embedded in the ways nurses were managed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It offers insights not only into the history of women's work but also the history of disease and the ways changing scientific knowledge shaped the management of nurses' health.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      Who cared for the carers?

      A history of the occupational health of nurses, 1880–1948

      by Debbie Palmer

      This book compares the histories of psychiatric and voluntary hospital nurses' health from the rise of the professional nurse in 1880 to the advent of the National Health Service in 1948. In the process it reveals the ways national ideas about the organisation of nursing impacted on the lives of ordinary nurses. It explains why the management of nurses' health changed over time and between places, and sets these changes within a wider context of social, political and economic history. Today, high rates of sickness absence in the nursing profession attract increasing criticism. Nurses took more days off sick in 2011 than private sector employees and most other groups of public sector workers. This book argues that the roots of today's problems are embedded in the ways nurses were managed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It offers insights not only into the history of women's work but also the history of disease and the ways changing scientific knowledge shaped the management of nurses' health.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      Recycling the disabled

      Army, medicine, and modernity in WWI Germany

      by Heather R. Perry

      Recycling the disabled: Army, medicine, and modernity in WWI Germany examines the 'medical organisation' of Imperial Germany for total war. Faced with mounting casualties and a growing labour shortage, German military, industrial, and governmental officials turned to medical experts for assistance in the total mobilisation of society. Through an investigation of developments in orthopaedic medicine, prosthetic technology, military medical organisation and the cultural history of disability, Heather Perry reveals how the pressures of modern industrial warfare not only transformed medical ideas and treatments for injured soldiers, but also transformed social and cultural expectations of the disabled body - expectations that long outlasted the war. This book is ideal for scholars and students interested in war, medicine, disability, science and technology, and modern Germany.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      Recycling the disabled

      Army, medicine, and modernity in WWI Germany

      by Heather R. Perry

      Recycling the disabled: Army, medicine, and modernity in WWI Germany examines the 'medical organisation' of Imperial Germany for total war. Faced with mounting casualties and a growing labour shortage, German military, industrial, and governmental officials turned to medical experts for assistance in the total mobilisation of society. Through an investigation of developments in orthopaedic medicine, prosthetic technology, military medical organisation and the cultural history of disability, Heather Perry reveals how the pressures of modern industrial warfare not only transformed medical ideas and treatments for injured soldiers, but also transformed social and cultural expectations of the disabled body - expectations that long outlasted the war. This book is ideal for scholars and students interested in war, medicine, disability, science and technology, and modern Germany.

    • History of medicine
      November 2015

      Destigmatising mental illness?

      Professional politics and public education in Britain, 1870–1970

      by Vicky Long

      This historical study of mental healthcare workers' efforts to educate the public challenges the supposition that public prejudice generates the stigma of mental illness. Drawing on extensive archival research, this book argues that psychiatrists, nurses and social workers generated representations of mental illness which reflected their professional aspirations, economic motivations and perceptions of the public. Sharing in the stigma of their patients, healthcare workers sought to enhance the prestige of their professions by focussing upon the ability of psychiatry to effectively treat acute cases of mental disturbance. As a consequence, healthcare workers inadvertently reinforced the stigma attached to serious and enduring mental distress. This book makes a major contribution to the history of mental healthcare, and critiques current campaigns which seek to end mental health discrimination for failing to address the political, economic and social factors which fuel discrimination. It will appeal to academics, students, healthcare practitioners and service users.

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