• Politics & government
      July 2015

      The Global Minotaur

      America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy

      by Yanis Varoufakis

      In this remarkable and provocative book, Yanis Varoufakis, former finance minister of Greece, explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a Global Minotaur was born. Today's deepening crisis in Europe is just one of the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global system which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. Going beyond this, Varoufakis reveals how we might reintroduce a modicum of reason into what has become a perniciously irrational economic order. An essential account of the socio-economic events and hidden histories that have shaped the world as we now know it

    • Politics & government
      February 2013

      The Global Minotaur

      America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy

      by Yanis Varoufakis

      In this remarkable and provocative book, Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a 'Global Minotaur' was born. Just as the Athenians maintained a steady flow of tributes to the Cretan beast, so Europe and the rest of the world began sending incredible amounts of capital to America and Wall Street. Thus, the Global Minotaur became the 'engine' that pulled the world economy from the early 1980s through to the financial collapse of 2008.Today's deepening crisis in Europe is just one of the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global 'system' which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. Going beyond this, Varoufakis lays out the options available to us for reintroducing a modicum of reason into a highly irrational global economic order.An essential account of the socio-economic events and hidden histories that have shaped the world as we now know it.

    • Economic systems & structures

      Breaking Through—The Birth of China’s Opening-up Policy

      by Lanqing Li (author)

      With an unmistakable sense of reality, thorough attention to minute detail and rich philosophical thoughts, Breaking Through—The Birth of China’s Opening-up Policy amounts to a living history of contemporary China. To be more specific, it is a book on the opening-up policy, a profoundly significant and influential event in human history, perhaps the greatest revolution of our time. Li Lanqing, one of the important figures in these events, provides the narrative ordered by his own memory. Breaking Through honors the 30th anniversary of the reform and openingup policy by telling an exciting, dramatic, and personal story, using many pictures, documents, and sources that have not been seen before. A living history of contemporary China A realistic interpretation of China at dawn of opening up to the outside world An inside story with many pictures, documents and sources that have not been revealed to the public before

    • Economic systems & structures

      The International Development of China

      by Yat-sen Sun (author)

      A rough sketch of Dr. Sun Yat-sen’s requirements to modernize China Elaborating an on Sun’s desire of how Nationalist China would carry out her program of economic reconstruction and development in terms of railroads and highways, river conservancy and irrigation, new ports and modern cities, basic industries

    • Business, Economics & Law
      November 2009

      Cheated not poisoned?

      Food regulation in the United Kingdom, 1875–1938

      by Michael French, Jim Phillips

      Newly available in paperback, this book provides the first comprehensive evaluation of Britain's food laws from the 1860s to the 1930s and the first analysis of the Victorian anti-adulteration legislation for over 25 years. The book brings important historical perspectives to the pressing contemporary debate about food safety and the most appropriate forms of regulation by indicating that government policy has historically been shaped by competing business and consumer-protectionist pressures. The book will interest teachers, students and general readers concerned with British history and economic and social history, and appeal to specialists in the fields of business history, regulation and food, medicine and nutrition. ;

    • Economic history
      September 2010

      History of Money

      From Ancient Times to the Present Day

      by Glyn Davies (Author)

      This is a straight-forward, readable account, written with the minimum of jargon, of the central importance of money in the ordinary business of the life of different people throughout the ages from ancient times to the present day. It includes the Barings crisis and the report by the Bank of England on Barings Bank; up-to-date information on the state of Japanese banking and the changes in the financial scene in the US. It also touches on the US housing market and the problem of negative equity. The paradox of why more coins than ever before are required in an increasingly cashless society is clearly explained, as is the role of the Euro coin as the lowest common denominator in Europe's controversial single currency system. The final section provides evidence to suggest that for most of the world's richer countries the era of persistent inflation may well be at an end. This new edition is updated and takes account of important recent developments such as the independence of the Bank of England, the introduction of Euro notes and coins from 1st of January 2002 and developments in electronic money.

    • Financial crises & disasters

      The Origin of Financial Crises

      Central Banks, Credit Bubbles and the Efficient Market Fallacy

      by George Cooper

      'The Origin of Financial Crises' provides a compelling analysis of the forces behind the recent economic crisis. In a series of disarmingly simple arguments George Cooper challenges the core principles of today's economic orthodoxy, explaining why financial markets do not obey the efficient market principles but are instead inherently unstable and habitually crisis prone.First published in the summer of 2008 in the midst of the crisis, the author accurately pinpointed the fundamental problems in policy and economic theory that led to the banking crisis. Now updated to reflect the massive upheavals since then and providing even more forthright opinions, the book is essential reading for anyone looking to find the root cause of our current financial situation.The book describes the evolution of our modern monetary system, explaining along the way how financial instability emerged and why this instability required the development of central banking. Cooper makes the point that misguided faith in the power of free markets has led some central banks to neglect their core role of managing the financial system and instead caused them to pursue policies promoting a series of ever more violent boom-bust cycles. 'The Origin of Financial Crises' calls for a radical shift in central bank strategy, the abandonment of inflation targeting and a paradigm shift in our attitude to economic policy.The reader will also learn about the fundamentals of inflation and discover what policy makers can learn from the designers of the Eurofighter jet and how an obscure paper on steam engines, written in 1868, shows us how to avoid repeating recent monetary policy mistakes.Uniquely, 'The Origin of Financial Crises' presents tangible policy proposals aimed at helping break out of the seemingly endless procession of damaging boom-bust cycles.

    • Economic history

      The Economic Consequences of the Peace

      The Classic Text On the Treaty of Versailles and Post War Europe

      by John Maynard Keynes

      An attendee at the ill-fated Versailles Conference, John Maynard Keynes had a front-row seat for the negotiations that would squander a peace and sew discord across a continent. One of his best-written works, 'The Economic Consequences of the Peace' was key in propelling Keynes to prominence. Published in 1919, it gained notoriety owing to its withering portraits of both French premier Georges Clemenceau and US president Woodrow Wilson.A best seller throughout the world, it was instrumental in creating the perception of the Germans as unfairly treated after the First World War. This in turn was crucial in prompting public support for appeasement, so that both the Treaty - and his eloquent criticisms of it - form a key part of the background to both World Wars I and II.

    • Economic history

      Americans View Their Dust Bowl Experience

      A Crow Creek Trilogy

      by Frances W Kaye

      Ideal for courses in American history, this book gathers first-person accounts of the trauma of the Thirties in the Heartland and assesses these accounts from the distance of several decades.

    • Economic history

      Was Wales Industrialised?

      Essays in Modern Welsh History

      by L. J. Williams

    • Politics & government

      An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

      by Adam Smith

      The Wealth of Nations is a treasured classic of political economy. First published in March of 1776, Adam Smith wrote the book to influence a special audience - the British Parliament - and its arguments in the early spring of that year pressed for peace and cooperation with Britain's colonies rather than war.Smith's message was that economic exploitation, through the monopoly trade of empire, stifled wealth-creation in both home and foreign lands. Moreover, protectionism preserved the status quo, and privileged a few elites at the expense of long run growth.Smith wrote, "It is the industry which is carried on for the benefit of the rich and the powerful that is principally encouraged by our mercantile system. That which is carried on for the benefit of the poor and the indigent is too often either neglected or oppressed."This edition, based on the classic Cannan version of the text, includes a foreword by George Osborne MP and an introduction by Jonathan B. Wight, University of Richmond, which aims to place the work in a business context. Wight also provides an invaluable 'Notable Quotes' section where he extracts and categorises some of the most famous and pertinent sections of Smith's work.This classic work is as essential today as it was when it first written.

    • Economic history

      Awstralia, Gwlad Yr Aur

      Teithiau I Awstralia Drwy Lygad Y Baledwyr Cymraeg

      by Rhiannon Ifans

      Aur a chyfoeth sydyn yn Awstralia yw thema ganolog y baledi y cyfeirir atynt yn y llyfryn hwn, ond wrth wneud hynny fe?n harweinir i feysydd eraill, annisgwyl iawn. Mewn modd dychmygus a chaboledig cawn gipolwg ar psyche y fam Gymreig, ac fe?n tywysir i olwg llofruddiaethau, llongddrylliadau a hyd yn oed ganibaliaeth. Er hynny, ni chollir golwg unwaith ar y llinyn Awstralaidd sy?n cydio?r cyfan wrth ei gilydd. Yn yr un gyfres: Pwy oedd Rhys Gethin?, Cledwyn Fychan a Gohebydd yng Ngheredigion yn ystod y Flwyddyn Fawr, Dylan Iorwerth.

    • History: specific events & topics

      A History of the London Stock Market 1945-2009

      by George G. Blakey

      This book is a unique record of the people, deals and events that have driven the stock market since 1945.Written in a down-to-earth, journalistic style, this book reads almost like a novel as it takes you through over 60 years of stock market history. Blakey provides a fascinating perspective on the movers and shakers - the winners, the losers, and the reasons why - giving a rare insight into the workings of the stock market, plus profiles of key players and the movements and effects of new, upcoming markets.The book includes coverage of all the major economic and political developments that have influenced the market, as well as the individuals and corporations themselves. It provides an invaluable reference for anyone wishing to understand and anticipate current and future trends in the market.This updated 6th edition now also covers the tumultuous period of 2007-2009.

    • Economic history

      Restoring Confidence in the Financial System

      See-through Leverage: A Powerful New Tool for Revealing and Managing Risk

      by Sean Tully

      'Restoring Confidence In The Financial System' is a ground-breaking book in which a top mathematician, who is also one of the City of London's most experienced traders, and an experienced City banker explore how confidence in the global financial system was destroyed by the current banking crisis. Drawing on his firsthand experience of steering the trading floor at a major European bank, Sean Tully, together with Richard Bassett, analyses the steps that led up to the crisis and pinpoint precisely one of the main causes of the lending bubble with whose consequences we are all now living.The authors explain the intricacies of the regulatory framework of Basel I and Basel II, the two landmark events in banking regulation which inadvertently laid the foundation for the current crisis. The authors then show how a radical and new but easily understood measure of risk, revealed here for the first time, can prevent another such bubble from ever happening again. This new measure, called see-through leverage or STL, can be used to restore faith in the financial system by allowing a rapid means of differentiating between potentially toxic and healthy 'AAA'-rated securities. Armed with STL, investors, rating agencies and regulators alike can cut through the complexity of economic modeling to the nub of the problem: leverage.'Restoring Confidence In The Financial System' is a vital book for the international business community. In a globally interconnected world, no one can claim to be untouched by the crisis. How could bankers have got their sums so wrong? How could regulators and politicians have failed to see the storm coming? Above all, how can confidence be restored to get the wheels of the global finance machine working again? This book has the solution.

    • Economic history

      The Distilleries of Campbeltown

      The Rise and Fall of the Whisky Capital of the World

      by David Stirk

      Campbeltown was once the whisky capital of the world with 29 distilleries operating simultaneously in 1835. How had this remote fishing port and royal burgh become the epicentre of Scotland's greatest export? David Stirk reveals all in this engaging and well illustrated insight into the people who were the movers and shakers behind this huge industry. The origins lie in illicit distilling which was prevalent all over Kintyre in the late 18th century. Many women were involved in this business which made many ordinary folk very wealthy and out of these origins, the legal trade was established in 1817 with Campbeltown Distillery being the first of many. Over the course of the next two decades every street and corner in the burgh had a distillery or brewery built on it. The names were redolent of Kintyre history and placenames: Kinloch, Caledonian, Dalaruan, Lochhead, Longrow, Meadowburn, Burnside, Kintyre, Rieclachan, Union, Argyll, Glenramskill, Highland, Springbank and Albyn, to name only some. It is no idle boast that Campbeltown was the Victorian whisky capital of the world and just as great schemes rise, so do they fall.;Ultimately the town's prosperity waned with the Great War, the depression, prohibition in the USA and the failure of local coal seams. Now only Springbank, Glen Scotia and Glen Gyle remain in production, solitary reminders of the once great whisky days of this Royal Burgh.

    • Reference works

      The Richest of the Rich

      The Wealthiest 250 People in Britain Since 1066

      by Philip Beresford

      A comprehensive study of Britain's 250 richest people in history, from the time of William the Conqueror to the present.In this new book, Philip Beresford, the author of The Sunday Times annual 'Rich List' and history expert William D. Rubinstein, have turned their attention to the wealthiest individuals in British history, revealing how they made their fortunes, the role played by luck, contacts and violence, and how successful they were in hanging on to their gains.People like:ÔÇó William of Warenne, the Earl of Surrey in the 1050s, who if he were alive today would be worth nearly ?ú74bn - over three times richer than Britain's current richest man (steel magnate Lakshmi Mittal).ÔÇó Archbishop Thomas Beckett, who took 250 servants with him on a visit to Paris in 1158, and was worth over ?ú24bn. Not that his fortune was much use when he was murdered in his own cathedral on the orders of Henry II.ÔÇó Robert Spencer, forebear of Princess Diana, who made a fortune in the wool trade, owned vast tracts of land in the colony of Virginia. and accumulated a fortune equivalent to ?ú19bn in today's money.ÔÇó John Scott, a celebrated gambler whose skills and luck helped him to a ?ú500,000 (?ú3.1bn) fortune. "As rich as Scott" was a popular saying of eighteenth century society.The authors provide a fascinating account of personal wealth and influence, noting how, throughout history, the opportunities for aggrandising wealth have been changed by technology, demographics, taxation, politics and war. If you are interested in business, society and the shifting patterns of advantage then you will find this book absorbing, intriguing and insightful.

    • Economic history

      A History of the London Stock Market, 1945-2007

      by George G. Blakey

      This book is a unique record of the people, deals and events that have driven the stock market since 1945Written in a down-to-earth, journalistic style, this book reads almost like a novel as it takes you through over 60 years of stock market history. Blakey provides a fascinating perspective on the movers and shakers - the winners, the losers, and the reasons why - giving a rare insight into the workings of the stock market, plus profiles of key players and the movements and effects of new, upcoming markets.The book includes coverage of all the major economic and political developments that have influenced the market, as well as the individuals and corporations themselves. It provides an invaluable reference for anyone wishing to understand and anticipate current and future trends in the market.

    • Economic history

      The Great Coalfied War

      by George McGovern

      "A definitive study of the Ludlow massacre and events leading up to it. This story has much drama and struggle, and it holds some crucial lessons about industrial strife and about how viciously brutal America's capitalists were a couple of generations ago." -- Los Angeles Times "The effect of this work is simply enraging, for the reality that the documentation evokes, both of wickedness and of the suffering that that wickedness caused, is intolerable." -- The New Yorker In the early 20th century, Colorado yielded more than a million tons of coal annually -- hacked and blasted out by immigrants from Eastern Europe living in crudely built towns owned by powerful mine operators. The companies owned the stores, ran the schools, churches, hospitals, and saloons, and bribed the region's lawmen to keep union organizers out. Mine safety was all but unheard-of when in 1913 mine explosions killed more than four hundred workers in just two of the mines. The United Mineworkers' Union infiltrated the towns, and thirteen thousand miners and their families made one mass exodus to establish a tent colony near the rail outpost at Ludlow. Months of fighting between the miners and company gunmen assisted by the Colorado State National Guard culminated in the Ludlow Massacre where tents were set afire, suffocating women and children who had sought shelter in storage pits beneath tent floorboards. The resultant public scandal compelled Washington to intervene, but it would take years before Colorado's coal miners gained union protection. The Great Coalfield War is a part of western history and an especially important part in view of today's declining union enrollments and the national movement to deregulate workplace safety laws and the federal agencies that enforce them.

    • Archaeology

      Archaeological Approaches to Market Exchange in Ancient Societies

      by Christopher P Garraty, Barbara L Stark (Editor)

      Ancient market activities are dynamic in the economies of most ancient states, yet they have received little research from the archaeological community. This is the first book to address the development, change, and organisational complexity of ancient markets from a comparative archaeological perspective. Drawing from historical documents and archaeological records from Mesoamerica, the U.S. Southwest, East Africa, and the Andes, this volume reveals the complexity of ancient marketplace development and economic behaviour both in hierarchical and non-hierarchical societies. Highlighting four principal themes -- the defining characteristics of market exchange; the recognition of market exchange archaeologically; the relationship among market, political, and other social institutions; and the conditions in which market systems develop and change -- the book contains a strong methodological and theoretical focus on market exchange. Diverse contributions from noted scholars show the history of market exchange and other activities to be more dynamic than scholars previously appreciated. This book will be of interest to archaeologists, anthropologists, material-culture theorists, economists, and historians.

    • Economic history

      Mechanics of Optimism

      Mining Companies, Technology & the Hot Spring Gold Rush, Montana Territory, 1864-1868

      by Jeffrey J Safford

      For every successful mining district celebrated in history, there were failed dozens whose stories have been largely forgotten. The Mechanics of Optimism documents, in rare detail, the boom-bust cycle of Hot Spring District, a mid-1860s Montana gold camp that did not pay, despite early predictions of a sure thing. Historian Jeffrey J Safford examines how gold mining ventures were developed and financed during and after the Civil War, and how men, primarily Easterners with scant knowledge of mining, were willing to invest large sums in gold mines that promised quick and lucrative returns. Safford explains how these mining companies were organised and underwritten, and why a little-known district in south-western Montana was chosen as a centre of operations. Relying on extensive primary sources, Safford addresses the mind-set of the businessmen, the expectations and realities of new mining technology, the financial strategies, and the universality of the Hot Spring experience.

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