• Political economy
      November 2015

      The Refusal of Work

      The Theory and Practice of Resistance to Work

      by David Frayne

      Paid work is absolutely central to the culture and politics of capitalist societies, yet today’s work-centred world is becoming increasingly hostile to the human need for autonomy, spontaneity and community. The grim reality of a society in which some are overworked, whilst others are condemned to intermittent work and unemployment, is progressively more difficult to tolerate. In this thought-provoking book, David Frayne questions the central place of work in mainstream political visions of the future, laying bare the ways in which economic demands colonise our lives and priorities. Drawing on his original research into the lives of people who are actively resisting nine-to-five employment, Frayne asks what motivates these people to disconnect from work, whether or not their resistance is futile, and whether they might have the capacity to inspire an alternative form of development, based on a reduction and social redistribution of work. A crucial dissection of the work-centred nature of modern society and emerging resistance to it, The Refusal of Work is a bold call for a more humane and sustainable vision of social progress.

    • Political economy
      August 2014

      Capitalism and Its Alternatives

      by Chris Rogers

      The global economic crisis has catalysed debates about the merits of capitalism as a system for organizing production, distribution and exchange. Political elites have argued that capitalism is not fundamentally pernicious or crisis-prone and can be successfully reformed with the right set of policies. Conversely, many have argued that a wholesale change of attitude towards the status and creation of wealth in contemporary society is required if crises of this kind are to be prevented in the future. In Capitalism and Its Alternatives, Chris Rogers provides a critical introduction to theories of capitalism and to the forms of its crises in historical and contemporary contexts, as well as reflecting on the practice of anti-capitalism and the ways that economic and social relations are shaped, reshaped and resisted. Crucially, the book asks two key questions: What alternatives to capitalism exist? And by what processes and through what institutions might they be achieved?

    • Sociology & anthropology
      March 2015

      The 1% and the Rest of Us

      A Political Economy of Dominant Ownership

      by Tim Di Muzio

      While the Occupy movement faces many strategic and organizational challenges, one of its major accomplishments has been to draw global attention to the massive disparity of income, wealth and privilege held by 1% of the population in nations across the world. In The 1% and the Rest of Us, Tim Di Muzio explores what it means to be part of a socio-economic order presided over by the super-rich and their political servants. Incorporating provocative and original arguments about philanthropy, social wealth and the political role of the super-rich, Di Muzio reveals how the 1% are creating a world unto themselves in which the accumulation of ever more money is really a symbolic drive to control society and the natural environment.

    • Political economy
      February 2014

      Capitalism in the Age of Globalization

      The Management of Contemporary Society

      by Samir Amin

      Samir Amin remains one of the world's most influential thinkers about the changing nature of North-South relations in the development of contemporary capitalism. In this highly prescient book, originally published in 1997, he provides a powerful analysis of the new unilateral capitalist era following the collapse of the Soviet model, and the apparent triumph of the market and globalization. Amin's innovative analysis charts the rise of ethnicity and fundamentalism as consequences of the failure of ruling classes in the South to counter the exploitative terms of globalization. This has had profound implications and continues to resonate today. Furthermore, his deconstruction of the Bretton Woods institutions as managerial mechanisms which protect the profitability of capital provides an important insight into the continued difficulties in reforming them. Amin's rejection of the apparent inevitability of globalization in its present polarising form is particularly prophetic - instead he asserts the need for each society to negotiate the terms of its inter-dependence with the rest of the global economy. A landmark work by a key contemporary thinker.

    • Political economy
      January 2014

      How Numbers Rule the World

      The Use and Abuse of Statistics in Global Politics

      by Lorenzo Fioramonti

      Numbers dominate global politics and, as a result, our everyday lives. Credit ratings steer financial markets and can make or break the future of entire nations. GDP drives our economies. Stock market indices flood our media and national debates. Statistical calculations define how we deal with climate change, poverty and sustainability. But what is behind these numbers? In How Numbers Rule the World, Lorenzo Fioramonti reveals the hidden agendas underpinning the use of statistics and those who control them. Most worryingly, he shows how numbers have been used as a means to reinforce the grip of markets on our social and political life, curtailing public participation and rational debate. An innovative and timely exposé of the politics, power and contestation of numbers.

    • Politics & government
      January 2016

      Power Politics

      How China and Russia Reshape the World

      by Rob de Wijk

      We tend to think of ourselves as living in a time when nations, for the most part, obey the rule of law - and where they certainly don't engage in the violent grabs for territory that have characterised so much of human history. But as Rob de Wijk shows in this book, power politics very much remains a force on the international scene. Offering analyses of such actions as Putin's annexation of the Crimea and China's attempts to claim large parts of the South China Sea, de Wijk explains why power politics never truly went away-and why, as the West's position weakens, it's likely to play a bigger and bigger role on the global stage in the coming years.

    • Economic systems & structures

      Breaking Through—The Birth of China’s Opening-up Policy

      by Lanqing Li (author)

      With an unmistakable sense of reality, thorough attention to minute detail and rich philosophical thoughts, Breaking Through—The Birth of China’s Opening-up Policy amounts to a living history of contemporary China. To be more specific, it is a book on the opening-up policy, a profoundly significant and influential event in human history, perhaps the greatest revolution of our time. Li Lanqing, one of the important figures in these events, provides the narrative ordered by his own memory. Breaking Through honors the 30th anniversary of the reform and openingup policy by telling an exciting, dramatic, and personal story, using many pictures, documents, and sources that have not been seen before. A living history of contemporary China A realistic interpretation of China at dawn of opening up to the outside world An inside story with many pictures, documents and sources that have not been revealed to the public before

    • Political economy

      Re-Solving the Economic Puzzle

      by Walter. Rybeck

      In the richest nation on earth, people are mired in poverty. Food is produced on a vast scale, yet families go hungry. Homeless men and women huddle in doorways of boarded-up housing. A deep-rooted cause of this inequality, the author reveals, lies in an injustice that permeates the economic system of America and the world, an injustice that is as unquestioned today as slavery once was.Rybeck shares with the reader his discovery that how property taxes are levied is crucial to this issue. Contrary to a common belief that all taxes are necessary evils, the author distinguishes taxes that suppress the economy from those that spur well-being for individuals, business, and society at large. He presents a strategy for gradually increasing beneficial taxes and reducing harmful ones.His prescriptions are based both on economic theory and on examination of success stories from the United States and elsewhere where these prescriptions have been adopted. Reaching back into history, the author finds that easy access to land and natural resources played a major role in fostering America’s early dynamic economy. He urges wider use of land value taxation to reverse land monopoly and sky-high land prices and restore a vigorous and competitive enterprise system with opportunity for all. Though America is the case study, the remedy is applicable worldwide.Not a technical book, the author illustrates concepts, issues, and policies through episodes from his rich life experiences in journalism and public service, giving new insights and slants on the work ethic, land speculation, the housing bubble, property rights, and legally accepted injustices.‘… could go far to restore our nation’s economic health’William J. Coyne, former Pittsburgh Congressman‘… a workable formula that will make our natural riches a blessing for the population as a whole’Ken Hechler, formerly White House Assistant, Congressman and West Virginia State Secretary‘…We know it works’ Stephen R. Reed, Harrisburg Mayor, 1982-2010

    • Political economy
      June 2016

      The Punitive City

      Privatised Policing and Protection in Neoliberal Mexico

      by Markus-Michael Müller 

      In the eyes of the global media, modern Mexico has become synonymous with crime, violence and insecurity. But while media fascination and academic engagement has focussed on the drug-war, an equally dangerous phenomenon has taken root. In The Punitive City, Markus-Michael Müller explores the contradictory responses of politicians, civic activists and local residents, to the extreme levels of security privatisation sweeping the region. Considering a wider context of urbanised neoliberalism and the democratisation of local politics, Müller argues that what has emerged in Mexico is not just a punitive urban democracy in which, despite the formal legal empowerment of the city's residents, those at the social and political margins face growing violence and exclusion. More alarmingly, it would seem that clientelism in the region is morphing into a private, political 'protection racket'. By side-stepping the neoliberal inspired, drug-war discourse Punishing the City identifies the root causes of insecurity in the region, and is vital reading for anyone seeking to understand the implications of a phenomenon that is becoming increasingly widespread across Latin America.

    • Political economy
      January 2010

      The making of German democracy

      West Germany during the Adenauer era, 1945–65

      by Armin Grünbacher

      This is the first English language source reader that deals with post-war (West) Germany. The sources, which include official Allied and German documents, parliamentary debates, contemporary newspapers articles, diaries and a large number of previously unpublished archival materials, allow for the first time a source-based study of post-war Germany for non-German speakers. The sources allow an assessment of the changes of Allied policy in the immediate post-war years which led to the establishment of the Federal Republic of Germany; explain the country's role in the intensifying Cold War; and encourage a re-evaluation of the 'economic miracle' and whether the Federal Republic signified a 'new start' for Germany or a 'restoration' of the old social forces and patterns. The book will be of great benefit to students of German post-war history at all levels. It offers a unique opportunity for teachers and lecturers to go well beyond the traditional sources explaining German History and the Cold War.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      January 2010

      The making of German democracy

      West Germany during the Adenauer era, 1945–65

      by Armin Grunbacher, Harry Bennett

      This is the first English language source reader that deals with post-war (West) Germany. The sources, which include official Allied and German documents, parliamentary debates, contemporary newspapers articles, diaries and a large number of previously unpublished archival materials, allow for the first time a source-based study of post-war Germany for non-German speakers. The sources allow an assessment of the changes of Allied policy in the immediate post-war years which led to the establishment of the Federal Republic of Germany; explain the country's role in the intensifying Cold War; and encourage a re-evaluation of the 'economic miracle' and whether the Federal Republic signified a 'new start' for Germany or a 'restoration' of the old social forces and patterns. The book will be of great benefit to students of German post-war history at all levels. It offers a unique opportunity for teachers and lecturers to go well beyond the traditional sources explaining German History and the Cold War. ;

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      Licensed larceny is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power? ;

    • Geography & the Environment
      May 2016

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      Licensed larceny is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power? ;

    • Political economy
      February 2016

      The English Classics of the National Economy

      Teaching and Effect

      by Joachim Starbatty

      The English classics of the national economy gave economics its generally-accepted scientific foundation: They systematically measured connections of cause and effect and disclosed the interdependencies of economic activity. Confrontation with the English classics provides the reader with the necessary clarity regarding the spirit of the historical background of the Western economic order. Anyone concerned with economic developments and the economic effects of political activity can, and must, study the classics. The work is supplemented by a contribution of Professor Heinz Rieter on patterns of interpretation of classic national economy.

    • Political science & theory
      May 2017

      Neoliberal power and public management reforms

      by Professor Peter Triantafillou. Series edited by Mark Haugaard

      This book examines the links between major contemporary public sector reforms and neoliberal thinking. The key contribution of the book is to enhance our understanding of contemporary neoliberalism as it plays out in the public administration and to provide a critical analysis of generally overlooked aspects of administrative power. The book examines the quest for accountability, credibility and evidence in the public sector. It asks whether this quest may be understood in terms of neoliberal thinking and, if so, how? The book makes the argument that while current administrative reforms are informed by several distinct political rationalities, they evolve above all around a particular form of neoliberalism: constructivist neoliberalism. The book analyses the dangers of the kinds of administrative power seeking to invoke the self-steering capacities of society and administration itself.

    • Economic theory & philosophy
      October 2016

      The econocracy

      The perils of leaving economics to the experts

      by Joe Earle. Series edited by Mick Moran

      One hundred years ago the idea of 'the economy' didn't exist. Now, improving the economy has come to be seen as perhaps the most important task facing modern societies. Politics and policymaking are conducted in the language of economics and economic logic shapes how political issues are thought about and addressed. The result is that the majority of citizens, who cannot speak this language, are locked out of politics while political decisions are increasingly devolved to experts. The econocracy explains how economics came to be seen this way - and the damaging consequences. It opens up the discipline and demonstrates its inner workings to the wider public so that the task of reclaiming democracy can begin.

    • Economic theory & philosophy
      October 2016

      The econocracy

      The perils of leaving economics to the experts

      by Joe Earle. Series edited by Mick Moran

      One hundred years ago the idea of 'the economy' didn't exist. Now, improving the economy has come to be seen as perhaps the most important task facing modern societies. Politics and policymaking are conducted in the language of economics and economic logic shapes how political issues are thought about and addressed. The result is that the majority of citizens, who cannot speak this language, are locked out of politics while political decisions are increasingly devolved to experts. The econocracy explains how economics came to be seen this way - and the damaging consequences. It opens up the discipline and demonstrates its inner workings to the wider public so that the task of reclaiming democracy can begin.

    • Geography & the Environment
      January 2017

      Licensed larceny

      Infrastructure, financial extraction and the global South

      by Nicholas Hildyard, Mick Moran

      The growing wealth gap is best viewed as a proxy for how for how effectively elites have constructed institutions that extract value from the rest of society. For inequality is not just a problem of poverty and the poor; it is as much a problem of wealth and the rich. The provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the one per cent, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. It is less about financing development than developing finance. Understanding and exposing these processes is essential if inequality is to be challenged. But equally important is the need for critical reflection on how the wealthy are getting away with it. What does the wealth gap suggest about the need for new forms of organizing by those who would resist elite power?

    • Business, Economics & Law
      November 2016

      The econocracy

      The perils of leaving economics to the experts

      by Joe Earle, Cahal Moran, Zach Ward-Perkins, Mick Moran

      One hundred years ago the idea of 'the economy' didn't exist. Now, improving the economy has come to be seen as perhaps the most important task facing modern societies. Politics and policymaking are conducted in the language of economics and economic logic shapes how political issues are thought about and addressed. The result is that the majority of citizens, who cannot speak this language, are locked out of politics while political decisions are increasingly devolved to experts. The econocracy explains how economics came to be seen this way - and the damaging consequences. It opens up the discipline and demonstrates its inner workings to the wider public so that the task of reclaiming democracy can begin.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      November 2016

      The econocracy

      The perils of leaving economics to the experts

      by Joe Earle, Cahal Moran, Zach Ward-Perkins, Mick Moran

      One hundred years ago the idea of 'the economy' didn't exist. Now, improving the economy has come to be seen as perhaps the most important task facing modern societies. Politics and policymaking are conducted in the language of economics and economic logic shapes how political issues are thought about and addressed. The result is that the majority of citizens, who cannot speak this language, are locked out of politics while political decisions are increasingly devolved to experts. The econocracy explains how economics came to be seen this way - and the damaging consequences. It opens up the discipline and demonstrates its inner workings to the wider public so that the task of reclaiming democracy can begin.

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