• Business, Economics & Law
      December 1998

      Explaining Unemployment

      Econometric Models for the Netherlands

      by D.A.G. Draper

      Europe's notoriously high level of unemployment is one of the big puzzles of empirical macroeconomics. In recent years, the unemployment rate has fallen in The Netherlands, but the overall level in OECD Europe remains high. An investigation into why Dutch economic policy has been relatively effective could be useful for the unemployment debate in Europe. This book contributes to this investigation with its empirical analysis covering three important topics. The first part of the book investigates whether (macro) economic policies could be effective in reducing unemployment in the short run. This depends on the cause of unemployment: is it due to lack of demand for goods, or is it due to a shortage of capacity. Another question is whether macroeconomic policies can be directed to one side of the market. The high rate of unemployment among low-skilled workers is the topic of the second part of this book. How important is the impact of wage inflexibility at the lower tail of the income distribution due to institutional factors? To what extent is it caused by skill-biased technological change? A central issue is, again, how economic policy could contribute to reducing unemployment among low-skilled workers? The persistence of unemployment is investigated in the third part. Since the early eighties, Dutch policymakers have employed wage moderation as a remedy for unemployment in The Netherlands. Substantial cutbacks were made in the social security programme. This had a moderating effect on wages, which is thought to have contributed to employment growth. However, unemployment remained rather high up to 1997. Why didn't unemployment fall more quickly? To answer these questions, economists have developed different structural macroeconometric models. The Netherlands has a rich tradition in using macroeconomic models for policy analysis. This tradition originates in the work of Jan Tinbergen, Nobel laureate in economics, and the first director of CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis. This book, which builds on CPB's broad experience with macroeconomic modelling, makes an important contribution to this fine Dutch tradition.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      November 1993

      Panel Data and Labour Market Dynamics

      3rd Conference : Papers

      by H. Bunzel, P. Jensen, N. Westergard-Nielsen

      The contributions in this volume, by leading economists from major universities in Europe and USA, cover research at the front line of econometric analysis and labour market applications. The volume includes several papers on equilibrium search models (a relatively new field), and job matching, both seen from a theoretical and from an applied point of view. Methods on and empirical analyses of unemployment durations are also discussed. Finally, a large group of papers examine the structure and the dynamics of the labour market in a number of countries using panel data. This group includes papers on data quality and policy evaluation. The high unemployment in most countries makes it necessary to come up with studies and methods for analysing the impact of different elements of economic policies. This volume is intended to contribute to further development in the use of panel data in economic analyses.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      October 2008

      Inequality and Poverty

      Papers from the Second Ecineq Society Meeting

      by John A. Bishop, Buhong Zheng

      Volume 16 of "Research on Economic" contains a selection of thirteen papers from the Second Biannual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, Berlin, July, 2007. This conference brings together both established scholars in the field of income distribution as well as advanced graduate students and new Ph.D's. The multi-day conference provides a forum for over 150 participants to share their work with one another. The papers contained in this volume are selected from a few of the many different sub-fields represented at the conference. As the title suggests a major emphasis of the volume is to collect work on the inequality of opportunity. An additional emphasis of the volume is on inequality measurement issues. Finally, the volume is designed to present work from both senior researchers and as well as emerging scholars. The volume begins with an essay on equal liberties by Serge-Christophe Kolm. The second paper examines the relationship between inequality and envy. The next four papers address the inequality of opportunities. Empirical studies of the equality of opportunity include Africa, Italy, Germany, and the United States. The measurement section also contains four papers. The topics covered in these papers include welfare analysis with ordinal data, unit consistency and multidimensional inequality indices, unit consistency and intermediate inequality indices, and the examination of two newly rediscovered inequality measures originally introduced by Bonferroni and De Vergotini. The volume also includes papers on the intergenerational transfer of income inequality and poverty in the US and Germany, income inequality and mobility in Argentina, the use of experimental methods to understand inequality aversion, and the recognition that measuring unemployment is an ethical problem, not simply an exercise in statistical measurement.

    • Health & Personal Development
      September 2017

      Factors in Studying Employment for Persons with Disability

      How the Picture can Change

      by Barbara Altman

      The current literature regarding employment among persons with disabilities produces research results dependent on definitions of work disability, the discipline within which research takes places, the model or paradigm of disability in which the research is framed, the methodology and measures used and the cultural context in which employment occurs. This volume seeks to address those factors which have made describing, predicting and examining the work experience of a person with a disability both different and difficult. Contributors examine less frequently anaylzed aspects of employment for persons with disabilities, and offer a variety of approaches to the conceptualization of work, how they differ across cultures, organizations, and types of disability. Topics covered include examination of range of contextual framing of employment for those with disabilities, well-being, the impact of gender, poverty and education and the collection concludes by examining the future of employment developments and trends and the impacts on inclusion of people with disabilities in the paid workforce.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2017

      Work-Integrated Learning in the 21st Century

      Global Perspectives on the Future

      by Tracey Bowen, Maureen Drysdale

      Work-Integrated Learning in the 21st century: Global perspectives on the future, explores new questions about the state of work for new university and college graduates in the context of Work-Integrated Learning (WIL). As these ‘Millennials’ graduate, they are entering a precarious labour market that is filled with ambiguity and uncertainty, creating a great deal of anxiety for those trying to develop skills for highly competitive jobs or jobs that do not yet exist. In their pursuit of skill acquisition, many are participating in WIL programs (e.g., cooperative education, internships) which allow them to gain practical experience while pursuing their education. With a focus on WIL, this book examines issues involved in developing work ready graduates. Topics include mental health and well-being - an urgent matter on many campuses; remote working - an aspect of the information and social media age that is becoming more prevalent as the precarity of work increases; issues of diversity and discrimination; ethics and professionalism; global citizenship and competency; and the role that higher education institutions need to play to prepare students for the challenges of economic shifts. These topics are timely and relevant to the situations faced by new graduates and those who prepare them for the world beyond school. The chapters provide a close examination of the issues from a global perspective, particularly as experiential education and work-integrated learning programs are becoming more prevalent in higher education and viewed as essential for preparing millennials for the 21st century competitive labour market.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2016

      Time, work and leisure

      Life changes in England since 1700

      by Hugh Cunningham, Jeffrey Richards

      This book traces the history of the relationship between work and leisure, from the 'leisure preference' of male workers in the eighteenth century, through the increase in working hours in the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, to their progressive decline from 1830 to 1970. It examines how trade union action was critical in achieving the decline; how class structured the experience of leisure; how male identity was shaped by both work and leisure; how, in a society that placed high value on work, a 'leisured class' was nevertheless at the apex of political and social power - until it became thought of as 'the idle rich'. Coinciding with the decline in working hours, two further tranches of time were marked out as properly without work: childhood and retirement. Accessible, wide-ranging and occasionally polemical, this book provides the first history of how we have imagined and used time.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      July 2016

      Cooking Up Success

      Helping You Discover the Job of Your Dreams

      by Cindy Etsell

      What inspires you and makes you jump out of bed in the morning? Have you always wanted a career where you cannot wait to start the day? Have you always wondered what your core skills are and what makes you tick? Then you will enjoy and find inspiration and amazing advice in Cooking up Success by an inspiring new writer, Cindy Etsell. In this innovative book Cindy shares her professional journey through her love of food; capturing funny stories and using her personal anecdotes to tell you everything you need to know about finding a job you'll love. What makes this book different is Cindy's ability to capture the fun of food and its similar process: taking raw ingredients for a recipe and identifying the key elements of your dream job. The fact is most people put more effort into planning their next trip than finding their next role. Cindy inspires and encourages you to do what you love and this step-by-step process will capture your imagination and direct your passions! Let Cindy help guide you, regardless of where you are now in your career, to discover what you love and cook up an individual recipe for success. As Confucius says, "Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life."

    • Health & Personal Development
      June 2015

      How To Get Your First Job And Build The Career You Want

      Over 100 tips and hints and a clear practical step by step guide to finding your first job and building on it to achieve an amazing career

      by Angela Middleton

      A step-by-step guide for 16–24-year-olds on how to choose the right career, get your first job, excel within that job and progress quickly. This book will give you the confidence and techniques to find the job of your dreams, regardless of your qualifications or background. Over 100 tips and hints in a clear practical step-by-step guide to finding your first job, building on it and achieving an amazing career.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2018

      Bridge That Gap!

      How Schools Can Help Students Get Their First Job And Build The Career They Want

      by Angela Middleton

      Bridge That Gap! How Schools Can Help Students Get Their First Job and Build the Career They Want by Angela Middleton is a thoughtful and insightful book that will be of invaluable assistance to teachers who really care about the futures of their pupils. Most education professionals will concede that there is a chasm between school careers advice and the reality for young people in gaining the skills that will help them make it in the real world of employment. This book showcases Angela’s extensive knowledge to explain how a bridge can be built to cross the divide between theory and practice – and will equip teachers with the wherewithal they need to help their pupils fly.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2016

      Time, work and leisure

      Life changes in England since 1700

      by Hugh Cunningham, Jeffrey Richards

      This book traces the history of the relationship between work and leisure, from the 'leisure preference' of male workers in the eighteenth century, through the increase in working hours in the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, to their progressive decline from 1830 to 1970. It examines how trade union action was critical in achieving the decline; how class structured the experience of leisure; how male identity was shaped by both work and leisure; how, in a society that placed high value on work, a 'leisured class' was nevertheless at the apex of political and social power - until it became thought of as 'the idle rich'. Coinciding with the decline in working hours, two further tranches of time were marked out as properly without work: childhood and retirement. Accessible, wide-ranging and occasionally polemical, this book provides the first history of how we have imagined and used time.

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