• Politics & government
      July 2015

      The Global Minotaur

      America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy

      by Yanis Varoufakis

      In this remarkable and provocative book, Yanis Varoufakis, former finance minister of Greece, explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a Global Minotaur was born. Today's deepening crisis in Europe is just one of the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global system which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. Going beyond this, Varoufakis reveals how we might reintroduce a modicum of reason into what has become a perniciously irrational economic order. An essential account of the socio-economic events and hidden histories that have shaped the world as we now know it

    • Economic theory & philosophy
      September 2011

      Debunking Economics - Revised and Expanded Edition

      The Naked Emperor Dethroned?

      by Steve Keen

      Debunking Economics exposes what many non-economists may have suspected and a minority of economists have long known: that economic theory is not only unpalatable, but also plain wrong. When the original Debunking was published back in 2001, the market economy seemed invincible, and conventional 'neoclassical' economic theory basked in the limelight. Steve Keen argued that economists deserved none of the credit for the economy's performance, and that 'the false confidence it has engendered in the stability of the market economy has encouraged policy-makers to dismantle some of the institutions which initially evolved to try to keep its instability within limits'. That instability exploded with the devastating financial crisis of 2007, and now haunts the global economy with the prospect of another Depression. In this radically updated and greatly expanded new edition, Keen builds on his scathing critique of conventional economic theory whilst explaining what mainstream economists cannot: why the crisis occurred, why it is proving to be intractable, and what needs to be done to end it. Essential for anyone who has ever doubted the advice or reasoning of economists, Debunking Economics provides a signpost to a better future.

    • Politics & government
      February 2013

      The Global Minotaur

      America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy

      by Yanis Varoufakis

      In this remarkable and provocative book, Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a 'Global Minotaur' was born. Just as the Athenians maintained a steady flow of tributes to the Cretan beast, so Europe and the rest of the world began sending incredible amounts of capital to America and Wall Street. Thus, the Global Minotaur became the 'engine' that pulled the world economy from the early 1980s through to the financial collapse of 2008.Today's deepening crisis in Europe is just one of the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global 'system' which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. Going beyond this, Varoufakis lays out the options available to us for reintroducing a modicum of reason into a highly irrational global economic order.An essential account of the socio-economic events and hidden histories that have shaped the world as we now know it.

    • Economics
      November 2015

      The Big Reset Revised Edition

      War on Gold and the Financial Endgame

      by Willem Middelkoop

      Amid the turmoil in the Eurozone, economic problems in Russia, stagnation in Japan, and rumblings that China may slip into recession, the one reliable asset is the American dollar. While it may encounter ups and downs, investors for decades have been confident that it will never lose a substantial part of its value. That may be about to change. In The Big Reset, Willem Middelkoop lays out the case for an inevitable monetary reset, one that will be designed to keep the United States in the driver's seat, but will include strong roles for the Euro and China's Renminbi-and, crucially, gold. This fully revised edition of Middelkoop's book takes into account developments since its original publication, which have only strengthened the case for the coming return of gold.

    • Economic theory & philosophy
      July 2015

      Capitalism and Human Values

      by Wilkinson, Tony, A01

      In this book we construct a foundation for values based on our common humanity and explore personal, social and political values from a fresh perspective.

    • Economic theory & philosophy
      September 2015

      Playing the Long Game

      How to Save the West from Short-Termism

      by Fitzjohn-Sykes, Laurie, A01

      This book explains how short-termism is damaging our economy and what we can do about it.

    • Economic theory & philosophy
      December 2015

      Casino capitalism

      with an introduction by Matthew Watson

      by Susan Strange

      Originally released by Basil Blackwell in 1986, and then re-released by Manchester University Press in 1998, Casino capitalism is a cutting-edge discussion of international financial markets, the way they behave and the power they wield. It examines money's power for good as well as its terrible disruptive, destructive power for evil. Money is seen as being far too important to leave to bankers and economists to do with as they think best. The raison d'être of Casino Capitalism is to expose the development of a financial system that has increasingly escaped the calming influences of democratic control. This new edition includes a powerful new introduction provided by Matthew Watson that puts the book it in its proper historical context, as well as identifying its relevance for the modern world. It will have a wide reaching audience, appealing both to academics and students of economics and globalization as well as the general reader with interests in capitalism and economic history.

    • Economic theory & philosophy
      December 2015

      Casino capitalism

      with an introduction by Matthew Watson

      by Susan Strange

      Originally released by Basil Blackwell in 1986, and then re-released by Manchester University Press in 1998, Casino capitalism is a cutting-edge discussion of international financial markets, the way they behave and the power they wield. It examines money's power for good as well as its terrible disruptive, destructive power for evil. Money is seen as being far too important to leave to bankers and economists to do with as they think best. The raison d'être of Casino Capitalism is to expose the development of a financial system that has increasingly escaped the calming influences of democratic control. This new edition includes a powerful new introduction provided by Matthew Watson that puts the book it in its proper historical context, as well as identifying its relevance for the modern world. It will have a wide reaching audience, appealing both to academics and students of economics and globalization as well as the general reader with interests in capitalism and economic history.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2015

      What a waste

      Outsourcing and how it goes wrong

      by Mick Moran, Andrew Bowman, Ismail Ertürk, Peter Folkman, Julie Froud, Colin Haslam, Sukhdev Johal, Adam Leaver, Mick Moran, Nick Tsitsianis, Karel Williams

      This is the first ever book to analyse outsourcing - contracting out public services to private business interests. It is an unacknowledged revolution in the British economy, and it has happened quietly, but it is creating powerful new corporate interests, transforming the organisation of government at all levels, and is simultaneously enriching a new business elite and creating numerous fiascos in the delivery of public services. What links the brutal treatment of asylum seeking detainees, the disciplining of welfare benefit claimants, the profits effortlessly earned by the privatised rail companies, and the fiasco of the management of security at the 2012 Olympics? In a word: outsourcing. This book, by the renowned research team at the Centre for Research on Socio Cultural Change in Manchester, is the first to combine 'follow the money' research with accessibility for the engaged citizen, and the first to balance critique with practical suggestions for policy reform. ;

    • Economic theory & philosophy

      The Myth of the Rational Market

      A History of Risk, Reward, and Delusion On Wall Street

      by Justin Fox

      Chronicling the rise and fall of the efficient market theory and the century-long making of the modern financial industry, Justin Fox's "The Myth of the Rational Market" is as much an intellectual whodunit as a cultural history of the perils and possibilities of risk. The book brings to life the people and ideas that forged modern finance and investing, from the formative days of Wall Street through the Great Depression and into the financial calamity of today. It's a tale that features professors who made and lost fortunes, battled fiercely over ideas, beat the house in blackjack, wrote bestselling books, and played major roles on the world stage. It's also a tale of Wall Street's evolution, the power of the market to generate wealth and wreak havoc, and free market capitalism's war with itself. The efficient market hypothesis - long part of academic folklore but codified in the 1960s at the University of Chicago - has evolved into a powerful myth. It has been the maker and loser of fortunes, the driver of trillions of dollars, the inspiration for index funds and vast new derivatives markets, and the guidepost for thousands of careers. The theory holds that the market is always right, and that the decisions of millions of rational investors, all acting on information to outsmart one another, always provide the best judge of a stock's value. That myth is crumbling.Celebrated journalist and columnist Fox introduces a new wave of economists and scholars who no longer teach that investors are rational or that the markets are always right. Many of them now agree with Yale professor Robert Shiller that the efficient markets theory "represents one of the most remarkable errors in the history of economic thought." Today the theory has given way to counterintuitive hypotheses about human behavior, psychological models of decision making, and the irrationality of the markets. Investors overreact, underreact, and make irrational decisions based on imperfect data. In his landmark treatment of the history of the world's markets, Fox uncovers the new ideas that may come to drive the market in the century ahead.

    • Economic theory & philosophy

      Milton Friedman

      A Concise Guide to the Ideas and Influence of the Free-market Economist

      by Eamonn Butler

      "One of the most important economic thinkers of all time..."- Paul KrugmanMilton Friedman changed the world. From free markets in China to the flat taxes of Eastern Europe, from the debate on drugs to interest rate policy, Friedman's skill for vivid argument and ideas led to robust and often successful challenges to a dizzying array of status quos.Relying on big-picture economic analysis and an insistent faith in human freedom, he took on the economic and political orthodoxies of his day - and if he didn't always win, he never failed to change the terms of the debate.Rarely an uncontroversial figure, with his disciples and detractors to this day, this is neither a credulous nor a critical look at the Nobel laureate. A brand new guide, it simply sets out to explain his economic and public policy thinking in a straightforward and accessible way for the general reader and student.Find out:- how Friedman undermined Keynesianism and the prevailing wisdom of large-scale economic intervention- how he demonstrated the true cause of the Great Depression and identified its real culprits (they weren't the ones jumping out of the windows)- what Friedman believed really destroys the value of the money in your pocket and how it can be stopped- his arguments for why regulations and minimum- wage laws actually achieve lower standards and greater poverty- his reasons for why big corporations prefer markets that aren't free, and how high taxation harms the wealthy less than anyone else."There's no such thing as a free lunch."- Milton FriedmanWith more, too, on democracy, equality, global trade, education, public services and financial crises, this is a concise but comprehensive guide to the influence of a key 20th century thinker.It is a must-read for anyone who wants to know more about the economist whose work changed everything.

    • Economic theory & philosophy

      Public Revenue Without Taxation

      by Ronald Burgess

      Gordon Brown was a past-master at sneaking in new taxes by stealth, but his efforts as Chancellor and then Prime Minister were merely the latest in a long line of party leaders desperate to extract more money from reluctant taxpayers. This book challenges the need for government to resort to such underhand practices which undermine the economy, killing the goose which lays the golden eggs, and the integrity of the political process.The author argues that not only does taxation flout the principle of private property, but it ‘is a primal cause of both inflation and unemployment. Regardless of this, the freely elected governments of contemporary trading economies – with the acquiescence of their electorates – persist in raising the major part, if not all, of their revenues by means of taxation. The immediate cause of such action by governments... is ignorance of any acceptable alternative method of raising sufficient public revenue.’Burgess shows how the development of Keynes’ general theory of employment ‘leads to the conclusion that an open trading economy is likely to be most competitive, and therefore most prosperous, only when taxation is abolished’ – but government must be funded. How can this be done without taxation?To provide an answer he refines Alfred Marshall’s distinction between the public and private value of property to reveal an alternative, peculiarly public source of revenue. Unlike a tax, defined by a former Labour Chancellor, Hugh Dalton, as ‘a compulsory contribution imposed by a public authority, irrespective of the exact amount of service rendered to the taxpayer in return’, the ‘public value’ identified by Marshall would deliver an exact equivalence between the benefits enjoyed and the amount paid. On the basis of this widely accepted definition, therefore, it is not a tax but the price for services rendered like any other transaction - the price fixed by the market.The author shows how reform may be introduced with a minimum of disruption, so that politicians with an eye to re-election can achieve measurable results during the lifetime of a parliament.

    • Economic theory & philosophy

      The 21st-century Case for a Managed Economy

      The Role of Disequilibrium, Feedback Loops and Scientific Method in Post-crash Economics

      by Sean Harkin

      This book argues that the scientific concept of feedback - the idea that change in some element of a system can cause further change in that element - represents a general concept of economic change. Positive feedback causes runaway change, such as a market bubble, inflation or long-run growth, while negative feedback causes stability and stasis. Emphasising both kinds of feedback stands in contrast to the equilibrium theories of classical economics which, in effect, emphasise negative feedback only. In practical terms, the feedback perspective implies a need for extensive government involvement in the economy to suppress undesirable feedback effects - such as those causing wild instability or self-perpetuating inequality - while supporting desirable feedback effects - such as those causing economic growth.--------------------For decades, free-market economists have told a consistent story. Markets are rational, efficient, stable and fair, and even volatile financial markets should be left mostly to their own devices. The economic crisis that began in 2007 has, however, disproven such belief in the perfection of markets.The reason market fundamentalism fails is simple: it is built on economic theories that incorporate only one half of how the economy actually operates. These theories focus on a concept of long-run equilibrium that sees the economy as being continually drawn back to balance after any change from this position, in a form of what scientists would call negative feedback.However, there is also positive feedback; a process whereby a given change amplifies itself until the system is driven far from equilibrium, and this phenomenon is equally visible in the economy. Positive feedback drives economic growth, speculative bubbles, inflation, recessions, deflation and self-perpetuating inequality. It is what gives us the secular trends and cyclical fluctuations we observe in the real economy. And it deserves to be a central part of our economic theory.This book makes a first attempt at applying the concept of feedback to economic theory and economic policy. It recognises that the state must support desirable feedbacks while suppressing undesirable ones. But it also recognises that central planning leads to oppression and inefficiency. This leads us back to the common-sense idea of a mixed economic system in which the role of the state is almost as great as that of the market.

    • Politics & government

      An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

      by Adam Smith

      The Wealth of Nations is a treasured classic of political economy. First published in March of 1776, Adam Smith wrote the book to influence a special audience - the British Parliament - and its arguments in the early spring of that year pressed for peace and cooperation with Britain's colonies rather than war.Smith's message was that economic exploitation, through the monopoly trade of empire, stifled wealth-creation in both home and foreign lands. Moreover, protectionism preserved the status quo, and privileged a few elites at the expense of long run growth.Smith wrote, "It is the industry which is carried on for the benefit of the rich and the powerful that is principally encouraged by our mercantile system. That which is carried on for the benefit of the poor and the indigent is too often either neglected or oppressed."This edition, based on the classic Cannan version of the text, includes a foreword by George Osborne MP and an introduction by Jonathan B. Wight, University of Richmond, which aims to place the work in a business context. Wight also provides an invaluable 'Notable Quotes' section where he extracts and categorises some of the most famous and pertinent sections of Smith's work.This classic work is as essential today as it was when it first written.

    • Economic theory & philosophy

      The 21st-century Case for a Managed Economy

      The Role of Disequilibrium, Feedback Loops and Scientific Method in Post-crash Economics

      by Sean Harkin

      This book argues that the scientific concept of feedback - the idea that change in some element of a system can cause further change in that element - represents a general concept of economic change. Positive feedback causes runaway change, such as a market bubble, inflation or long-run growth, while negative feedback causes stability and stasis. Emphasising both kinds of feedback stands in contrast to the equilibrium theories of classical economics which, in effect, emphasise negative feedback only. In practical terms, the feedback perspective implies a need for extensive government involvement in the economy to suppress undesirable feedback effects - such as those causing wild instability or self-perpetuating inequality - while supporting desirable feedback effects - such as those causing economic growth.--------------------For decades, free-market economists have told a consistent story. Markets are rational, efficient, stable and fair, and even volatile financial markets should be left mostly to their own devices. The economic crisis that began in 2007 has, however, disproven such belief in the perfection of markets.The reason market fundamentalism fails is simple: it is built on economic theories that incorporate only one half of how the economy actually operates. These theories focus on a concept of long-run equilibrium that sees the economy as being continually drawn back to balance after any change from this position, in a form of what scientists would call negative feedback.However, there is also positive feedback; a process whereby a given change amplifies itself until the system is driven far from equilibrium, and this phenomenon is equally visible in the economy. Positive feedback drives economic growth, speculative bubbles, inflation, recessions, deflation and self-perpetuating inequality. It is what gives us the secular trends and cyclical fluctuations we observe in the real economy. And it deserves to be a central part of our economic theory.This book makes a first attempt at applying the concept of feedback to economic theory and economic policy. It recognises that the state must support desirable feedbacks while suppressing undesirable ones. But it also recognises that central planning leads to oppression and inefficiency. This leads us back to the common-sense idea of a mixed economic system in which the role of the state is almost as great as that of the market.

    • Economic theory & philosophy

      The Wealth of Nations (Complete & Unabridged)

      An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

      by Adam Smith

      The Wealth of Nations is a treasured classic of political economy. First published in March of 1776, Adam Smith wrote the book to influence a special audience - the British Parliament - and its arguments in the early spring of that year pressed for peace and cooperation with Britain's colonies rather than war.Smith's message was that economic exploitation, through the monopoly trade of empire, stifled wealth-creation in both home and foreign lands. Moreover, protectionism preserved the status quo, and privileged a few elites at the expense of long run growth.Smith wrote, "It is the industry which is carried on for the benefit of the rich and the powerful that is principally encouraged by our mercantile system. That which is carried on for the benefit of the poor and the indigent is too often either neglected or oppressed."This edition, based on the classic Cannan version of the text, includes a foreword by George Osborne MP and an introduction by Jonathan B. Wight, University of Richmond, which aims to place the work in a business context. Wight also provides an invaluable 'Notable Quotes' section where he extracts and categorises some of the most famous and pertinent sections of Smith's work.This classic work is as essential today as it was when it first written.

    • Business, Economics & Law

      A New Model of the Economy

      by Brian Hodgkinson

      The book offers a radical revision of modern economic theory. Its starting point is the existing body of both micro and macro economics, as developed in such textbooks as "Economics" by Begg, Fischer and Dombusch and "Positive Economics" by Lipsey and Chrystal. Following a similar framework as these books, it adjusts the whole range of theory by introducing some new concepts and other earlier ones that have been much neglected in the economic thought of the past century. These are related especially to the fundamental part played by land, in its proper sense of all natural resources available on the earth, the significance of credit, especially through the banking system, and the crucial impact of the method of taxation. The resulting analysis yields a thoroughly revised version on the contemporary model of a capitalist economy, so that a genuine 'third way' is revealed. This is not a mere modification of the present system of absentee ownership confronting a market for labour, with all the attendant evils of unemployment, monopoly and misdistribution of wealth and income. Rather it is a system based upon natural law, exhibiting economic security for all, fair distribution of output and, above all, the opportunity for self-fulfilment through work. The "new model"; draws upon the masters of economic thought from Smith and Ricardo, to Marshall, Schumpeter and Keynes by highlighting concepts often omitted from current studies of their works; such as Ricardo's' analysis of scarcity and differential elements of rent, Schumpeter's view of the role of banking and Keynes' hints at a labour theory of value. Indeed, this far reaching revision makes bold advances upon the Marshallian theory of the firm and the Keynesian theory of national income determination, thus providing new insights into both micro and macro theory. It remains faithful, however, to the tradition of these latter thinkers in explaining matters fully in words and resorting to mathematics mainly through the use of diagrams intelligible to anyone with an elementary grasp of the subject. Whilst the book strives to avoid value judgments in the interests on social science, it undoubtedly carries strong implications about economic policy. These are bound up with the central notions of free land and free credit, which have been singularly ignored by policy-makers since a few valiant attempts to introduce them in the early twentieth century. Hence the 'new model' is offered to both theorists and practitioners of Economics, to politicians and public servants, but particularly to those who, like the author, truly seek a new vision of the subject. --- The author, who has taught economics for many years, deliberately follows the broad outline of modern textbooks to offer a radical revision of modern economic theory. The book is aimed at economists disillusioned with the disconnect between what is taught at universities and the real world. One of our Ethical Economics titles www.ethicaleconomics.org.uk.

    • Economic theory & philosophy

      Lombard Street

      The Classic Book On the Money Market and the Bank of England

      by Walter Bagehot

      A classic of the 19th century, 'Lombard Street' describes the workings of the markets, international finance and central banks with a lucidity and insight that still dazzles. As Peter L. Bernstein, author of 'Against the Gods', puts it: "Walter Bagehot invented crisis management; after nearly 150 years, his wise words are still the prescription of choice for containing financial crises as well as a handbook for avoiding them."

    • Economic theory & philosophy

      Essays in Islamic Economics

      by M. Fahim. Khan

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