• Naval forces & warfare

      A Most Secret Squadron

      The First Full Story of 618 Squadron and Its Special Detachment Anti-u-boat Mosquitos

      by Des. Curtis

    • Naval forces & warfare
      August 2015

      THE WORLD ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AIRCRAFT CARRIERS AND NAVAL AIRCRAFT

      Features 1100 wartime and modern identification photographs

      by Bernard Ireland Francis Crosby

      This meticulously researched and illustrated book focuses on the evolution of aircraft carriers and naval aircraft. It features chronological histories and comprehensive directories of the world s most important aviation ships and aircraft, including the first ships to launch primitive aircraft; biplanes that were catapulted from converted destroyers; modern warships capable of carrying jets and helicopters; and state-of-the-art jets that are unique for their vertical take-off ability. With more than 1100 magnificent photographs, this book provides historians and enthusiasts with key information about the world s greatest aircraft carriers and naval aircraft. THE WORLD ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AIRCRAFT CARRIERS AND NAVAL AIRCRAFT Features 1100 wartime and modern identification photographs Bernard Ireland and Francis Crosby CLICK HERE TO READ THE WHOLE BOOK IN DIGITAL FORM

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2002

      The Comparative Study of Conscription in the Armed Forces

      by Lars Mjoset, Stephen Holde

      This volume contributes to the comparative study of military conscription. Issues discussed include: a conceptual clarification of conscription as distinguished from volunteerism and militia service; the emergence of the citizen soldier model; patterns of anti-militarism before World War I; conscription in third world armies; gender-issues in relation to military service; the present phenomenon of child soldiers in Africa; the decline of conscript armies in Western Europe. A review section discusses the contribution of rational choice theory to the analysis of conscription into military forces.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2018

      A new naval history

      by James Davey, Quintin Colville, Katherine Parker, Elaine Chalus, Evan Wilson, Barbara Korte, Cicely Robinson, Cindy McCreery, Ellie Miles, Mary A. Conley, Jonathan Rayner, Daniel Spence, Emma Hanna, Ulrike Zimmerman, Max Jones, Jan Rüger

      A New Naval History brings together the most significant and interdisciplinary approaches to contemporary naval history. The last few decades have witnessed a transformation in how this field is researched and understood and this volume captures the state of a field that continues to develop apace. It examines - through the prism of naval affairs - issues of nationhood and imperialism; the legacy of Nelson; the socio-cultural realities of life in ships and naval bases; and the processes of commemoration, journalism and stage-managed pageantry that plotted the interrelationship of ship and shore. This bold and original publication will be essential for undergraduate and postgraduate students of naval and maritime history. Beyond that, though, it marks an important intervention into wider historiographies that will be read by scholars from across the spectrum of social history, cultural studies and the analysis of national identity.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2019

      Dreadnoughts

      An Illustrated History

      by Gerald Toghill

      Two things made the battleship possible: the harnessing of steam for propulsion and Britain’s vast industrial power in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. With these two massive powerhouses available to ship designers, it was inevitable that change would come to the seas. For a short while France led the way with the launching of their Gloire, but Britain soon stole the limelight with the launch of the Warrior in 1863. The moment her keel hit the water the naval world was turned upside down and all other warships were rendered obsolete. But that event was as nought compared to the astonishing revolution in warship building caused by the launch in 1906 of the mighty Dreadnought. If Warrior had caused a great upheaval, the impact of Dreadnought was positively Krakatoan. Such was her impact on the naval world that her very name became generic. All Battleships built before her were classed as ‘pre-Dreadnought’ and all battleships built post-1906 came to be known as ‘Dreadnoughts.’ This is their story.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2019

      The Great Scuttle

      The End of the German High Seas Fleet

      by David Meara

      After the German surrender in 1918, the German High Seas Fleet was interned at Scapa Flow in the Orkneys. Determined not to see his ships fall to the hands of the Allied Powers, the German Admiral von Reuter decided to scuttle his fleet and secretly passed orders between his ships for their skeleton crews to open the seacocks. Most ships began to sink within hours, witnessed by a visiting band of school children suddenly caught up in an event of international importance. This book follows the events of that momentous day, drawing on the eye-witness accounts of those who saw the crisis unfold at first hand. The book makes extensive use of archive material, personal letters and contemporary photographs to bring alive the extraordinary events of that midsummer’s day in 1919.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2019

      The Fleet Air Arm and Royal Naval Air Service in 100 Objects

      by David Morris

      Only six years after man had successfully flown for the first time with controlled, powered flight in 1903, the Royal Navy could already see the potential of taking flying machines to sea. Initially utilised to extend the view from the ships crow’s nest, the aircraft at sea would become one of the most influential strides forward in the history of the Royal Navy. This book uses 100 objects and key references that define the Royal Naval Air Service and Fleet Air Arm, setting them from other flying services. From aircraft and technology to training, language and recreation, the flying branch of the Royal Navy has long had its own specific set of objects, rules and traditions.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2019

      Dreadnoughts

      An Illustrated History

      by Gerald Toghill

      Two things made the battleship possible: the harnessing of steam for propulsion and Britain’s vast industrial power in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. With these two massive powerhouses available to ship designers, it was inevitable that change would come to the seas. For a short while France led the way with the launching of the Gloire, but Britain soon stole the limelight with the launch of HMS Warrior in 1863. The moment her keel hit the water the naval world was turned upside down and all other warships were rendered obsolete. But that event was as nought compared to the astonishing revolution in warship building caused by the launch in 1906 of the mighty Dreadnought. If Warriorhad caused a great upheaval, the impact of Dreadnought was positively Krakatoan. Such was her impact on the naval world that her very name became generic. All battleships built before her were classed as ‘pre-Dreadnought’ and all battleships built post-1906 came to be known as ‘Dreadnoughts’. This is their story.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2019

      The Great Scuttle: The End of the German High Seas Fleet

      Witnessing History

      by David Meara

      After the German surrender in November 1918, the German High Seas Fleet was interned at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, the anchorage for the Royal Navy’s Grand Fleet throughout the First World War. Determined not to see his ships fall into the hands of the Allied Powers as the protracted peace negotiations at Versailles dragged on, the German commander, Admiral Von Reuter, decided to scuttle his fleet and secretly passed orders between his ships for their skeleton crews to open the seacocks on 21 June 1919. Most ships began to sink within hours, witnessed by a visiting group of school children suddenly caught up in an event of international importance. More than fifty of the seventy-four German ships that had steamed into Scapa Flow were successfully scuttled and sunk, the remainder having been beached before they could sink. More than thirty of the sunken warships would later be raised but the others remain on the seabed, making Scapa Flow one of the world’s top diving destinations. This book follows the events of that momentous day, drawing on the eyewitness accounts of those who saw the crisis unfold at first hand. The book makes extensive use of archive material, personal letters and contemporary photographs to bring alive the extraordinary events of that Midsummer’s Day in 1919.

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