• Land forces & warfare

      Command Culture

      Officer Education in the U.s. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, and the Consequences for World War Ii

      by JÞorg Muth

      In Command Culture, Joerg Muth examines the different paths the United States Army and the German Armed Forces traveled to select, educate, and promote their officers in the crucial time before World War II. Muth demonstrates that the military education system in Germany represented an organized effort where each school and examination provided the stepping stone for the next. But in the United States, there existed no communication about teaching contents or didactical matters among the various schools and academies, and they existed in a self chosen insular environment. American officers who finally made their way through an erratic selection process and past West Point to the important Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, found themselves usually deeply disappointed, because they were faced again with a rather below average faculty who forced them after every exercise to accept the approved "school solution." Command Culture explores the paradox that in Germany officers came from a closed authoritarian society but received an extremely open minded military education, whereas their counterparts in the United States came from one of the most democratic societies but received an outdated military education that harnessed their minds and limited their initiative. On the other hand, German officer candidates learned that in war everything is possible and a war of extermination acceptable. For American officers, raised in a democracy, certain boundaries could never be crossed. This work for the first time clearly explains the lack of audacity of many high ranking American officers during World War II, as well as the reason why so many German officers became perpetrators or accomplices of war crimes and atrocities or remained bystanders without speaking up. Those American officers who became outstanding leaders in World War II did so not so much because of their military education, but despite it.

    • 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000
      May 2011

      WWII Voices

      by Hilary Kaiser

      These oral histories give voice to both American veterans who chose to reside in France after World War II and to French women who married GIs and subsequently emigrated to the United States. Author Hilary Kaiser introduces us into the lives of seventeen soldiers of various ethnicity, gender and rank, and revisits their diverse experience as American servicemen in WWII France. Ms. Kaiser elicits fascinating and candid first person narratives of the key wartime events which transformed the lives of these men and women. Each chapter constitutes an inspirational short story starting with WWII and ending with the present day status of these unsung heroes and the women who loved them. Anyone with an interest in WWII and its effects on the lives of ordinary men and women will thoroughly enjoy this book

    • History
      November 2014

      Flogging Others

      Corporal Punishment and Cultural Identity from Antiquity to the Present

      by G.Geltner

      Corporal punishment is often seen as a litmus test for a society's degree of civilization. Its licit use purports to separate modernity from premodernity, enlightened from barbaric cultures. As Geltner argues, however, neither did the infliction of bodily pain typify earlier societies nor did it vanish from penal theory, policy, or practice. Far from displaying a steady decline that accelerated with the Enlightenment, physical punishment was contested throughout Antiquity and the Middle Ages, its application expanding and contracting under diverse pressures. Moreover, despite the integration of penal incarceration into criminal justice systems since the nineteenth century, modern nation states and colonial regimes increased rather than limited the use of corporal punishment. Flogging Others thus challenges a common understanding of modernization and Western identity and underscores earlier civilizations' nuanced approaches to punishment, deviance, and the human body. Today as in the past, corporal punishment thrives due to its capacity to define otherness efficiently and unambiguously, either as a measure acting upon a deviant's body or as a practice that epitomizes - in the eyes of external observers - a culture's backwardness.

    • General & world history

      A Greater Love

      by Olga Watkins

      The true story of a woman's incredible journey into the heart of the Third Reich to find the man she loves. When the Gestapo seize 20-year-old Olga Czepf's fiance she is determined to find him and sets off on an extraordinary 2,000-mile search across Nazi-occupied Europe risking betrayal, arrest and death. As the Second World War heads towards its bloody climax, she refuses to give up - even when her mission leads her to the gates of Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps... Now 89 and living in London, Olga tells with remarkable clarity of the courage and determination that drove her across war-torn Europe, to find the man she loved. The greatest untold true love story of World War Two.

    • Biography: historical, political & military
      March 2016

      Cribs For Victory

      The Untold Story of Bletchley Park's Secret Room

      by Joss Pearson

      Cribs For Victory is a posthumous account of the secret code-breaking process in Bletchley Park’s Fusion Room during World War II by Major Neil Webster, one of the key members of the team involved. The Fusion Room was the central unit where decrypted German messages obtained from Hut 6 were compared with the corresponding data extracted by the log readers from the daily radio traffic between enemy stations, thus enabling a complete wartime picture of the enemy order of battle to be constructed. Neil Webster’s liaison role between traffic analysis and cryptography meant he was centrally involved in the search for ‘cribs’ – short pieces of enciphered text where the meaning is either known or can be guessed, allowing the whole cipher to be broken. His book describes this intensive search in detail, the intellectual and technical challenge, the personal stories, the setbacks and the triumphs.

    • Combat / defence skills & manuals
      August 2014

      Wing Chun Seize & Control

      by Guy Edwards

      A world first exclusive devoted entirely to Kum Na-Sieze & Control aspects of the art is a must for all practitioners interested in furthering their skills. During this book you will learn the important phases of how Wing Chun creates a myriad of joint busts, locks & traps from a broken link to adhesion of the limbs. The grappling applications of the system are highly unique in character as they use the key principles familiar with Wing Chun to control the opponent's movements. An informative read that demonstrates clearly the devastating actions which are mainly secluded from the teachings found in most Wing Chun syllabus of the mainstream.

    • Weapons & equipment
      August 2015

      Small Arms of the Vietnam War

      A Photographic Study

      by Tom Laemlein

      With the modern military emphasis on whiz-bang weapons technology and the constant quest for things that make a bigger bang on the battlefield, it’s easy to forget that at the dark heart of war stands an infantryman and his individual weapons. Those who understand warfare from research or from personal experience generally realize that about conflicts that have plagued mankind since the dawn of time. Infantry weapons – often simply referred to as small arms – have fascinated soldiers and scholars for decades as they are the most personal aspects of combat. Small arms come into play when contact is close and potentially lethal. This was particularly true during the long, frustrating war in Vietnam but much of the focus in studying that conflict has been either on aerial weapons – strike aircraft or armed helicopters – or on the originally much-maligned M-16 rifle. There were huge numbers of other weapons used daily by both sides but they are often ignored and rarely seen being used in combat action. This book solves that problem. Divided into easily digestible sections and preceded by cogent discussion of each weapon type, the authors have presented an intriguing collection of photographs that depict the primary small (and not so small) infantry arms most common on Vietnam battlefields. There are rare and stirring images here that depict what it was like to fight in the jungle-covered mountains and in the rice paddies. Viewing these images is like studying a primer about one of America’s longest and deadliest wars.

    • Air forces & warfare

      Bloody Shambles.

      by Christopher F. Shores

    • Science: general issues
      June 2012

      Losing Small Wars

      British Military Failure in Iraq and Afghanistan

      by Frank Ledwidge

    • Social, group or collective psychology
      August 1997

      The Question of German Guilt

      by Karl Jaspers

      In the years after the Nazi government fell, a philosophy professor at Hindenberg University lectured on a subject which burned the consciousness and conscience of thinking Germans. "Are the German people guilty?". These lectures by Karl Jaspers, a European philosopher, attracted wide attention among German intellectuals and students; they seemed to offer a path to sanity and morality in a disordered world.;Jaspers, a life-long liberal, has attempted in this book to discuss rationally a problem that has thus far evoked only heat and fury. Neither an evasive apology nor a wholesome condemnation, this book distinguishes between types of guilt and degrees of responsibility. He lists four categories of guilt: criminal guilt (the commitment of overt acts), political guilt (the degree of political acquiescence in the Nazi regime), moral guilt (a matter of private judgement among one's friends), and metaphysical guilt (a universally shared responsibility of those who chose to remain alive rather than die in protest againt Nazi atrocities).;Born in 1883, Karl Jaspers took his degree in medicine but soon became interested in psychiatry. He is the author of a standard work of psychopathology, as well as special studies on Strindberg, Van Gogh and Nietszche. After World War I he became Professor of Philosophy at Heidelberg wher he achieved fame as a brilliant teacher and an early exponent of existentialism. He was among the first to acquaint German readers with the works of Kierkegaard.;Jaspers had to resign from his post in 1935. From the total isolation into which the Hitler regime forced him, Jaspers returned in 1945 to a position of central intellectual leadership of the younger liberal elements of Germany. In his first lecture in 1945, he forcefuly reminded his audience of the fate of the German Jews. Jaspers' unblemished record as an anti-Nazi has made him a rallying point centre for those of his countrymen who wish to reconstruct a free and democratic Germany.

    • History of the Americas
      December 2001

      "I Must be a Part of this War"

      A German American's Fight against Hitler and Nazism

      by Patricia Kollander, with John O'Sullivan

    • Social, group or collective psychology
      August 1997

      The Question of German Guilt

      The New Media and the Markle Foundation

      by Karl Jaspers

      In the years after the Nazi government fell, a philosophy professor at Hindenberg University lectured on a subject which burned the consciousness and conscience of thinking Germans. "Are the German people guilty?". These lectures by Karl Jaspers, a European philosopher, attracted wide attention among German intellectuals and students; they seemed to offer a path to sanity and morality in a disordered world.;Jaspers, a life-long liberal, has attempted in this book to discuss rationally a problem that has thus far evoked only heat and fury. Neither an evasive apology nor a wholesome condemnation, this book distinguishes between types of guilt and degrees of responsibility. He lists four categories of guilt: criminal guilt (the commitment of overt acts), political guilt (the degree of political acquiescence in the Nazi regime), moral guilt (a matter of private judgement among one's friends), and metaphysical guilt (a universally shared responsibility of those who chose to remain alive rather than die in protest againt Nazi atrocities).;Born in 1883, Karl Jaspers took his degree in medicine but soon became interested in psychiatry. He is the author of a standard work of psychopathology, as well as special studies on Strindberg, Van Gogh and Nietszche. After World War I he became Professor of Philosophy at Heidelberg wher he achieved fame as a brilliant teacher and an early exponent of existentialism. He was among the first to acquaint German readers with the works of Kierkegaard.;Jaspers had to resign from his post in 1935. From the total isolation into which the Hitler regime forced him, Jaspers returned in 1945 to a position of central intellectual leadership of the younger liberal elements of Germany. In his first lecture in 1945, he forcefuly reminded his audience of the fate of the German Jews. Jaspers' unblemished record as an anti-Nazi has made him a rallying point centre for those of his countrymen who wish to reconstruct a free and democratic Germany.

    • Literary essays
      February 1999

      Fighting Fascism in Europe

      The World War II Letters of an American Veteran of the Spanish Civil War

      by Lawrence Cane

      On his first day in basic training in 1942, Lawrence Cane wrote to his wife Grace from Fort Dix, New Jersey. "I'm in the army now - really!", he wrote, complaining, "I don't have enough time to write a decent letter".;Three years later, Captain Lawrence Cane went home from World War II. He'd landed at Utah Beach on D-Day, helped liberate France and Belgium, and survived the Battle of the Bulge. He won a Silver Star for bravery. And he still managed to write 300 letters home to Grace. This book is a different kind of war story - both a powerful chronicle of life in battle and a unique portrait of courage fuelled by a life-long passion for political justice.;Cane's fight for freedom began well before D-Day. In 1937, he joined the Abraham Lincoln Battalion and got wounded fighting for democracy in Spain. In 1942, at age 30, he enlisted in the new war against fascism, and as an officer with the 238th Combat Engineer Battalion, went ashore in Normandy to clear mines, destroy fortifications and open roads from Normandy to the Siegfried Line. Of the 400 Spanish Civil War veterans in World War II, Cane was the only one to go ashore on D-Day.;After the war, Lawrence Cane fought for civil rights and peace until his death in 1976. Discovered in 1995 by Cane's son David, his letters are not only classic accounts of war and unforgettable expressions of love for family, they are the fiercely patriotic words of a left-wing, working class, New York Jew (and one-time Communist Party member) who knew exactly why we fought - to create a better world by destroying all forms of fascism, one battle at a time.;With an introduction by David Cane, detailed notes, and much additional material, these letters add a new dimension to the meaning of American patriotism and a valuable chapter to the history of "the greatest generation".

    • Biography: general
      March 2001

      Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free

      Memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman and POW

      by Alexander Jefferson, with Lewis H. Carlson

      This book is a rare and important gift. One of the few memoirs of combat in World War II by a distinguished African-American flier, it is also perhaps the only account of the African-American experience in a German prison camp. Alexander Jefferson was one of 32 Tuskegee Airmen from the 332nd Fighter Group to be shot down defending a country that considered them to be second-class citizens. A Detroit native, Jefferson enlisted in 1942, trained at Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, became a second lieutenant in 1943, and joined one of the most decorated fighting units in the War, flying P51s with their legendary - and feared - "red tails." Based in Italy, Jefferson flew bomber escort missions over southern Europe before being shot down in France in 1944. Captured, he spent the balance of the war in Luftwaffe prison camps in Sagan and Moosberg, Germany. In this vividly detailed, deeply personal book, Jefferson writes as a genuine American hero and patriot. It's an unvarnished look at life behind barbed wire - and what it meant to be an African-American pilot in enemy hands.;It's also a look at race and democracy in America through the eyes of a patriot who fought to protect the promise of freedom. The book features the sketches, drawings, and other illustrations Jefferson created during his nine months as a "kriegie" (POW) and Lewis Carlson's authoritative background to the man, his unit, and the fight Alexander Jefferson fought so well.

    • General & world history
      May 2002

      France during World War II

      From Defeat to Liberation

      by Thomas R. Christofferson, and Michael S. Christofferson

    • General & world history
      March 2007

      Hungary in World War II

      Caught in the Cauldron

      by Deborah S. Cornelius

    • Sociology & anthropology

      Sacred Objects and Sacred Places

      Preserving Tribal Traditions

      by Andrew Gulliford

      Sacred Objects, Sacred Places combines native oral histories, photographs, drawings, and case studies to present current issues of cultural preservation vital to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Complete with commentaries by native peoples, non-native curators, and archaeologists, this book discusses the repatriation of human remains, the curation and exhibition of sacred masks and medicine bundles, and key cultural compromises for preservation successes in protecting sacred places on private, state, and federal lands. The author traveled thousands of miles over a ten-year period to meet and interview tribal elders, visit sacred places, and discuss the power of sacred objects in order to present the essential debates surrounding tribal historic preservation. Without revealing the exact locations of sacred places (unless tribes have gone public with their cultural concerns), Gulliford discusses the cultural significance of tribal sacred sites and the ways in which they are being preserved. Some of the case studies included are the Wyoming Medicine Wheel, Devil's Tower National Monument, Mount Shasta in California, Mount Graham in Arizona, and the Sweet Grass Hills in Montana. Federal laws are reviewed in the context of tribal preservation programs, and tribal elders discuss specific cases of repatriation. Though the book describes numerous tribal tragedies and offers examples of cultural theft,Sacred Objects and Sacred Places affirms living traditions. It reveals how the resolution of these controversies in favor of native people will ensure their cultural continuity in a changing and increasingly complex world. The issues of returning human remains, curating sacred objects, and preserving tribal traditions are addressed to provide the reader with a full picture of Native Americans' struggles to keep their heritage alive.

    • History

      Lee's Ferry

      From Mormon Crossing to National Park

      by P. T. Reilly, ed. Robert H. Webb

      The Colorado River and its deeply entrenched canyons create a lengthy barrier to travel in the interior West. Here and there, ancient Indian foot trails descend canyon walls and find access to the river, but one of the few places between California and Nevada where wheeled vehicles can approach it is at the mouth of the Pahreah River, between Glen Canyon and the river's steep drop toward Grand Canyon. Here, from the mid-19th until well into the 20th century, Lee's Ferry was a primary link between Utah and Arizona. Mormons trying to reach potential Indian converts and new lands for colonization to the south first developed the site. John D. Lee and parts of his family, seeking an inconspicuous spot after the Mountain Meadows massacre, first took up residence at what they called Lonely Dell. In subsequent decades, many interesting and important western characters passed through this topographical and historical funnel, from John Wesley Powell to Buffalo Bill. As river exploration and adventure increased, the place became as important to those using the river-surveyors, miners, river runners-as to folks crossing it. In recognition of its importance, Lee's Ferry has been partially restored as a historic site in the national park system. P. T. Reilly, himself a legend on the river as boatman and chronicler, wrote the detailed and colorful history this place demanded, focusing on stories of the hodgepodge of people it attracted. He died before he finished reworking his massive narrative into book form, but Robert H. Webb, author of Grand Canyon: A Century of Change, completed that job and selected rare historical photos from the Reilly collection at Northern Arizona University to illustrate it. An epilogue by Richard Quartaroli provides a biographical sketch of P. T. Reilly.

    • Warfare & defence

      Action Before Westport, 1864

      by Howard N. Monnett

      The military events surrounding the frontier village of Westport, Missouri, during the autumn of 1864 were part of a Confederate raid that exceeded any Civil War cavalry raid. The climax of a last-ditch Confederate invasion of Missouri, the battle ended forever the bitter fighting that had devastated the Missouri-Kansas border. First published more than thirty years ago and now available with a new introduction and notes that update the text, Action Before Westport presents the only full account of that most unusual and daring Civil War battle.In addition to incorporating official records, newspaper accounts, letters, diaries, journals, and privately printed records, Monnett consulted several previously undiscovered manuscripts, two of them the work of key Confederate generals in the raid. The result is a classic work that is both immensely readable and impressive in its documentation.

    • History

      From Yorktown to Valmy

      The Transformation of the French Army in an Age of Revolution

      by Samuel F Scott

      Based on exhaustive research in archives in the United States and France, this book provides detailed study of some sixty-five hundred officers and soldiers of the French expeditionary corps that served under Rochambeau in the American Revolution. It traces their experiences in this country after their departure from France in the spring of 1780, their role in the victory over Cornwallis, their return to France and resumption of peacetime duties from 1783 to 1789, and their reactions to revolution in their own country and the war that followed. The author's focus on these men and their regiments, the only substantial force of foreign allies ever to serve on American soil for an extended period of time, affords the opportunity to assess the impact of these momentous events upon the lives of rather ordinary people.

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