• History
      November 2014

      Flogging Others

      Corporal Punishment and Cultural Identity from Antiquity to the Present

      by G.Geltner

      Corporal punishment is often seen as a litmus test for a society's degree of civilization. Its licit use purports to separate modernity from premodernity, enlightened from barbaric cultures. As Geltner argues, however, neither did the infliction of bodily pain typify earlier societies nor did it vanish from penal theory, policy, or practice. Far from displaying a steady decline that accelerated with the Enlightenment, physical punishment was contested throughout Antiquity and the Middle Ages, its application expanding and contracting under diverse pressures. Moreover, despite the integration of penal incarceration into criminal justice systems since the nineteenth century, modern nation states and colonial regimes increased rather than limited the use of corporal punishment. Flogging Others thus challenges a common understanding of modernization and Western identity and underscores earlier civilizations' nuanced approaches to punishment, deviance, and the human body. Today as in the past, corporal punishment thrives due to its capacity to define otherness efficiently and unambiguously, either as a measure acting upon a deviant's body or as a practice that epitomizes - in the eyes of external observers - a culture's backwardness.

    • Laws of Specific jurisdictions
      July 2014

      The Rise & Fall of Freedom in America

      by Ray Hall

      This book will show you how to get the government off your back and out of your life! Do you realize the government considers you their property? When you’re the property of others, that’s defined as SLAVERY! Do you realize the government PRESUMES it’s sovereign over you, and can tell you what you can and can’t do? Do you realize America is currently governed by forces that want to totally control you? This book is filled with REMEDIES! It will also teach you: The almost lost knowledge of the foundational principles our system was originally founded upon and how individuals can easily restore their true God given legal status as sovereigns over those pretending to be our government. It is filled with remedies that will get the government off your back and out of your life. However, you can’t be saved as long as you’re ignorant of the correct principles our system endowed us with, principles that are no longer taught because if they were, the conspirators could not get away with what they are doing.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      February 2015

      Sweet Rosa

      by Kingsley Osei, David Asimeng

      Sweet Rosa is a picture book which details the brave stance of a young African-American woman named Rosa Parks who refused to give up her seat to a white person on bus in 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama. Ms. Parks' actions led to the infamous Montgomery bus boycott and helped establish the civil rights movement led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The bold and courageous act of Ms. Parks, Dr. King and thousands of boycotters and civil rights advocates eventually pushed the Supreme Court to declare segregation on buses unconstitutional, helping to put racial discrimination to rest. This book takes young readers on an historic, illustrious journey through this staple event and how it has forever shaped the racial outlook of equality for adults and children alike in today's society.

    • Politics & government
      October 2015

      We Kill Because We Can

      From Soldiering to Assassination in the Drone Age

      by Laurie Calhoun

      Welcome to the Drone Age. Where self defence has become naked aggression. Where courage has become cowardice. Where black ops have become standard operating procedure. In this remarkable and often shocking book, Laurie Calhoun dissects the moral, psychological and cultural impact of remote-control killing in the Twenty-First Century. How can a mafia hitman be likened to a drone operator conducting a targeted killing? What difference, if any, is there between the Trayvon Martin case and the drone killing of a teen in Yemen? We Kill Because We Can takes a scalpel to the dark heart of Western foreign policy in order to answer these and many other disturbing questions.

    • Constitutional & administrative law
      October 2000

      The Politics of Judicial Interpretation

      The Federal Courts, Department of Justice, and Civil Rights, 1866-1876

      by Robert John Kaczorowski

    • Aid & relief programmes
      November 2000

      Human Security For All

      A Tribute to Sergio Vieira de Mello

      by Edited by Kevin M. Cahill, M.D.

      The tragic death in Baghdad in 2003 of Sergio Vieira de Mello, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, brought into bitter relief the challenges faced by peacekeepers and humanitarian aid workers. The contributors to this book, all leading scholars and practitioners, offer invaluable perspectives on many of the most important political, legal, social, and military challenges confronting humanitarian aid in a world of terror and conflict. These original essays explore such topics as human rights and the rights of the displaced, working with local communities to rebuild viable governance, justice, and the rule of law, and maintaining safe spaces for humanitarian relief programs in zones of conflict.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      September 2008

      Speaking about Torture

      by Edited by Julie A. Carlson, and Elisabeth Weber

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      September 2008

      Speaking about Torture

      by Edited by Julie A. Carlson, and Elisabeth Weber

    • Aid & relief programmes
      November 2000

      Human Security For All

      A Tribute to Sergio Vieira de Mello

      by Edited by Kevin M. Cahill, M.D.

      The tragic death in Baghdad in 2003 of Sergio Vieira de Mello, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, brought into bitter relief the challenges faced by peacekeepers and humanitarian aid workers. The contributors to this book, all leading scholars and practitioners, offer invaluable perspectives on many of the most important political, legal, social, and military challenges confronting humanitarian aid in a world of terror and conflict. These original essays explore such topics as human rights and the rights of the displaced, working with local communities to rebuild viable governance, justice, and the rule of law, and maintaining safe spaces for humanitarian relief programs in zones of conflict.

    • Human rights
      April 2001

      Women Witnessing Terror

      Testimony and the Cultural Politics of Human Rights

      by Anne Cubilie

      A model of engaged scholarship, this book examines first-person testimonials by women who have survived abuse and atrocity in zones of conflict and terror. Drawing on a wide range of sources and settings, including genocide, state terror, ethnic cleansing, and war, Anne Cubilie uses survivor testimony as theoretical invention, placing personal witness in dialogue with work by philosophers, literary theorists, and others who study the space between victim and survivor, ethical witness and silenced observer, male and female. This nuanced example of ethical criticism demonstrates forcefully how ethical witnessing - listening to the voices of survivors - reformulates the language of human rights and enhances its ability to intervene against violence and oppression.

    • Human rights

      On Liberty

      The Philosophical Work That Changed Society for Ever

      by John Stuart

      A potent defence of the individual, and a foundational text for political and social Liberalism, 'On Liberty' is a classic of English philosophy.An important and fascinating book, in many respects it provided the spiritual basis of modern Western society - mistrustful of religion, respectful of non-conformity, and prizing personal over social fulfillment.

    • Politics & government

      From Chinese Exclusion to Guantôanamo Bay

      Plenary Power and the Prerogative State

      by Natsu Taylor Saito

      This study details historic applications of the plenary power doctrine, in which US courts allow the executive branch full power over groups of citizens without concomitant constitutional protection, showing that expansions of power aren't unique to the Bush administration but part of a troubling tradition that, according to the author, undermines American principles and may violate international human rights law.

    • Biography: general

      Owain Glyndòwr

      by Aeres Twigg

    • Media, information & communication industries
      April 2000

      Free to Be Human

      Intellectual Self-defence in an Age of Illusions

      by David Edwards

      This is a book about freedom, and above all about the idea that there is often no greater obstacle to freedom than the assumption that it has already been fully attained. While in the West few individuals today suffer physical restraint by the state, we are still constrained by powerful psychological chains?ùwhich are in many ways far more effective, if only because they are so difficult to perceive. Influential writers such as Noam Chomsky and Edward Herman have shown that the corporately controlled mass media of Western democracies serve as a giant filter system favouring powerful state and business interests: what we receive as ?æobjective news?Æ about domestic politics, human rights and environmental issues, is in fact an extremely partial and biased view of the world. Free to be Human shows how the same filter system distorts our understanding of many personal, ethical and spiritual issues, ensuring that we remain passive, conformist, confused and uninformed?ùand willing to accept the irrational values of corporate consumerism. David Edwards argues that, in order to counter this continual process of disinformation and disempowerment, we need to master the arts of ?æintellectual self-defence?Æ and so become able to challenge the deceptions of a system that subordinates people and planet to the drive for profit.

    • Sociology & anthropology

      The Road to Southend Pier

      One Man's Struggle Against the Surveillance Society

      by Ross Clark

      A chance encounter with a talking lamp-post got Ross Clark thinking: is there any escape from Britain's growing surveillance society? He set himself a challenge: could he get to Southend without Big Brother knowing where he had gone? In this entertaining and highly revealing account of his attempt to dodge Britain's 4.2 million CCTV cameras and other forms of surveillance, Ross Clark lays bare the astonishing amount of data which is kept on us by the state and by commercial organisations, and asks whom should we fear most: the government agencies who are spying on us - or the criminals who seem to prosper in the swirling fog of excessive data-collection.Among his discoveries are:- An information company in Nottingham seemed to know he has cherry trees in his garden.- If he flies to New York, the FBI will keep a record of what he had for lunch.- 2,700 people are wrongly recorded as criminals on Britain's Police National Computer.- 70 Americans have been implanted with microchips to help identify them if they become lost and confused.- British companies are routinely vetting potential employees by searching MySpace for evidence of drunken antics and sexual perversion.- It will take 905 man-years to issue every British citizen with an ID card.

    • Human rights
      April 2001

      Women Witnessing Terror

      Testimony and the Cultural Politics of Human Rights

      by Anne Cubilie

      A model of engaged scholarship, this book examines first-person testimonials by women who have survived abuse and atrocity in zones of conflict and terror. Drawing on a wide range of sources and settings, including genocide, state terror, ethnic cleansing, and war, Anne Cubilie uses survivor testimony as theoretical invention, placing personal witness in dialogue with work by philosophers, literary theorists, and others who study the space between victim and survivor, ethical witness and silenced observer, male and female. This nuanced example of ethical criticism demonstrates forcefully how ethical witnessing - listening to the voices of survivors - reformulates the language of human rights and enhances its ability to intervene against violence and oppression.

    • Social & political philosophy
      October 2004

      The Opinion System

      Impasses of the Public Sphere from Hobbes to Habermas

      by Kirk Wetters

    • General & world history

      The Predator Culture

      The Roots and Intent of Organised Violence

      by Fred Harrison

      Understanding the territorial basis of political power and wealth is the pre-requisite, the author argues, for making sense of issues as diverse as genocide, narco-gangsterism, terrorism and fascism. Fred Harrison draws on global-wide case studies to show how the violent birth of nation-states, whether the result of territorial conquests or colonialism, splits the population into two classes, victors and vanquished. This division is perpetuated and legitimated through the system of land tenure. The pathological consequences - as diverse as failed states, organised crime (mafia), religious fundamentalism and the re-emergence of piracy - are the result of the violent uprooting of the original inhabitants from their homelands. The struggle over land and resources, Harrison contends, is at the root of all of today's global crises. Some attempts are being made to restore land to those in need, ranging from the offer of land in Afghanistan to the Taliban as an inducement to set aside their violent strategies, to the sharing of the rents of oil in Nigeria to entice eco-warriors into mainstream politics. But these piecemeal tactics fail to synthesise the conditions for peace and prosperity. "The Predator Culture" provides a framework for truth and reconciliation in what has become a violent world that is slipping dangerously out of control.

    • Politics & government

      Tribal Government Today

      by James J Lopach , Margery Hunter Brown , Richmond L Clow

      An account of Fourth World peoples within a First World nation, TRIBAL GOVERNMENT TODAY is a critical analysis of the contemporary progress of Indian tribes toward self-government and economic sufficiency. Focusing on seven reservations in Montana representing the diverse opportunities and problems facing Indian tribes in the West, this book approaches tribal government from the twin perspectives of reservation politics and the legal context within which reservation conflicts must be solved. Unlike previous studies of Indian politics, Tribal Government Today is neither a critique of American Indian policy over the years nor an analysis of federal, state, and tribal jurisdictional ambiguities. The authors -- a political scientist, a lawyer, and a historian -- focus instead on the distinctive political culture that has evolved on each reservation in terms of the reservation settings, governmental structures and procedures, and a particular brand of politics.

    • Political control & freedoms

      Torn Apart

      United By Love, Divided By Law

      by Judy. Rickard

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