• Geopolitics
      July 2014

      America's Deadliest Export

      Democracy - The Truth About US Foreign Policy and Everything Else

      by William Blum

      For over sixty-five years, the United States war machine has been on automatic pilot. Since World War II we have been conditioned to believe that America's motives in 'exporting' democracy are honorable, even noble. In this startling and provocative book, William Blum, a leading dissident chronicler of US foreign policy and the author of controversial bestseller Rogue State, argues that nothing could be further from the truth. Moreover, unless this fallacy is unlearned, and until people understand fully the worldwide suffering American policy has caused, we will never be able to stop the monster.

    • Development studies
      January 2015

      South Sudan: A Slow Liberation

      by Edward Thomas

      In 2011, South Sudan became an independent country. Its long liberation struggle was an attempt to right the wrongs of brutal colonial conquest, deliberate neglect and racial oppression organized by governments headquartered at Khartoum. The long struggle has had a violent aftermath. The war of liberation has been marked by looting, raids and massacres that pitted ethnic communities against each other. In this remarkably comprehensive work, Edward Thomas provides a multi-layered examination of what is happening in the country today. Writing from the perspective of South Sudan's most mutinous hinterland, Jonglei state, the book explains how this area was at the heart of South Sudan's liberation. Drawing on hundreds of interviews and a broad range of sources, this book gives a sharply focused, fresh account of South Sudan's long, unfinished struggle for liberation.

    • Development studies
      March 2015

      Spaces of Aid

      How Cars, Compounds and Hotels Shape Humanitarianism

      by Lisa Smirl

      Aid workers commonly bemoan that the spaces and experiences of working in 'the field' often sit uneasily with the goals they've signed up to: from visiting project sites in air-conditioned Land Cruisers while the intended beneficiaries walk barefoot through the heat, to checking emails from within gated compounds while surrounding communities have no running water. While such observations might seem intuitive, to date no concerted academic or policy study has dealt with the impact of these factors on theory or policy. Spaces of Aid provides the first book-length analysis of what has colloquially been referred to as Aid Land, exploring in depth two high-profile case studies - the Aceh tsunami and Hurricane Katrina - in order to uncover a fascinating history of the material objects that have become an endemic, expected, yet unexamined part of the aid landscape.

    • Political economy
      January 2014

      How Numbers Rule the World

      The Use and Abuse of Statistics in Global Politics

      by Lorenzo Fioramonti

      Numbers dominate global politics and, as a result, our everyday lives. Credit ratings steer financial markets and can make or break the future of entire nations. GDP drives our economies. Stock market indices flood our media and national debates. Statistical calculations define how we deal with climate change, poverty and sustainability. But what is behind these numbers? In How Numbers Rule the World, Lorenzo Fioramonti reveals the hidden agendas underpinning the use of statistics and those who control them. Most worryingly, he shows how numbers have been used as a means to reinforce the grip of markets on our social and political life, curtailing public participation and rational debate. An innovative and timely exposé of the politics, power and contestation of numbers.

    • Geopolitics
      May 2016

      Today We Drop Bombs, Tomorrow We Build Bridges

      How Foreign Aid became a Casualty of Wa

      by Peter Gill 

      The ‘War on Terror’ has politicized foreign aid in a way never before seen, with often devastating consequences. Aid workers are being killed in unprecedented numbers, and civilians in war-torn countries abandoned to their fate. From the battlefield in Afghanistan to the frontier refugee camps in Pakistan, the ravaged streets of Mogadishu to the tense flashpoint of the Turkey-Syria border, Peter Gill travels to some of the most conflict-stricken places on earth to reveal the new relationship between aid agencies and western security. While some agencies have clung to their neutrality, he finds others risking their impartiality in their pursuit of official funding. In a world where the advance of Islamic State constitutes the gravest affront to humanitarian practice and principle faced in decades, Gill poses the crucial question – can Western nations go to war in a country and aid it at the same time?

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2015

      Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

      by Ilan Danjoux, Peter Lawler, Emmanuel Pierre Guittet

      Do political cartoons predict violence? To answer this question Ilan Danjoux examined over 1200 Israeli and Palestinian editorial cartoons to explore whether changes in their content anticipated the outbreak of the Al-Aqsa Intifada in October of 2000. Despite stark differences in political, economic and social pressures, a notable shift in focus, style and tone accompanied the violence. With numerous illustrations and detailed methodology, Political cartoons and the Israeli Palestinian conflict provides readers with an engaging introduction to cartoon analysis and a novel insight into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In a region fraught with contested realities, the cartoon's ability to capture the latent fears and unspoken beliefs of these antagonists offers a refreshing perspective on how both Israelis and Palestinians perceived each other and their chances for peace on the eve of the Second Intifada. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2012

      Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

      by Ilan Danjoux, Peter Lawler, Emmanuel Pierre Guittet

      Do political cartoon predict violence? To answer this question Ilan Danjoux examined over 1200 Israeli and Palestinian editorial cartoons to explore whether changes in their content anticipated the outbreak of the Al-Aqsa Intifada in October of 2000. Despite stark differences in political, economic and social pressures, a notable shift in focus, style and tone accompanied the violence. With numerous illustrations and detailed methodology, Political Cartoons and the Israeli Palestinian Conflict provides readers an engaging introduction to cartoon analysis and a novel insight into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In a region fraught with contested realities, the cartoon's ability to capture the latent fears and unspoken beliefs of these antagonists offers a refreshing perspective on how both Israelis and Palestinians perceived each other and their chances for peace on the eve of the Second Intifada. ;

    • International law
      June 2017

      The Acquisition of Territory in International Law with a New Introduction by Marcelo G. Kohen

      by R.Y. Jennings (deceased). Series edited by Jean D'Aspremont, Iain Scobbie

      Originally published by Manchester University Press in 1963, this book is now regarded as a classic of international law literature. Jennings examines the major issues relating to the acquisition of territory in a stimulating and elegant manner, providing a sense of the critical relationship between law and politics on the international scene - vital if law is to be practiced and interpreted correctly. This reissue features a new introduction by Marcelo G. Kohen of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, contextualising the work and discussing its continued relevance to students of international law and international lawyers themselves. He is one of the leading experts on questions of acquisition of territory, having been involved in numerous territorial disputes before the International Court of Justice.

    • International law
      June 2017

      The Acquisition of Territory in International Law with a New Introduction by Marcelo G. Kohen

      by R.Y. Jennings (deceased). Series edited by Jean D'Aspremont, Iain Scobbie

      Originally published by Manchester University Press in 1963, this book is now regarded as a classic of international law literature. Jennings examines the major issues relating to the acquisition of territory in a stimulating and elegant manner, providing a sense of the critical relationship between law and politics on the international scene - vital if law is to be practiced and interpreted correctly. This reissue features a new introduction by Marcelo G. Kohen of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, contextualising the work and discussing its continued relevance to students of international law and international lawyers themselves. He is one of the leading experts on questions of acquisition of territory, having been involved in numerous territorial disputes before the International Court of Justice.

    • Political science & theory
      May 2017

      Neoliberal power and public management reforms

      by Professor Peter Triantafillou. Series edited by Mark Haugaard

      This book examines the links between major contemporary public sector reforms and neoliberal thinking. The key contribution of the book is to enhance our understanding of contemporary neoliberalism as it plays out in the public administration and to provide a critical analysis of generally overlooked aspects of administrative power. The book examines the quest for accountability, credibility and evidence in the public sector. It asks whether this quest may be understood in terms of neoliberal thinking and, if so, how? The book makes the argument that while current administrative reforms are informed by several distinct political rationalities, they evolve above all around a particular form of neoliberalism: constructivist neoliberalism. The book analyses the dangers of the kinds of administrative power seeking to invoke the self-steering capacities of society and administration itself.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      Neoliberal power and public management reforms

      by Peter Triantafillou, Mark Haugaard

      This book examines the links between major contemporary public sector reforms and neoliberal thinking. The key contribution of the book is to enhance our understanding of contemporary neoliberalism as it plays out in the public administration and to provide a critical analysis of generally overlooked aspects of administrative power. The book examines the quest for accountability, credibility and evidence in the public sector. It asks whether this quest may be understood in terms of neoliberal thinking and, if so, how? The book makes the argument that while current administrative reforms are informed by several distinct political rationalities, they evolve above all around a particular form of neoliberalism: constructivist neoliberalism. The book analyses the dangers of the kinds of administrative power seeking to invoke the self-steering capacities of society and administration itself.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      Neoliberal power and public management reforms

      by Peter Triantafillou, Mark Haugaard

      This book examines the links between major contemporary public sector reforms and neoliberal thinking. The key contribution of the book is to enhance our understanding of contemporary neoliberalism as it plays out in the public administration and to provide a critical analysis of generally overlooked aspects of administrative power. The book examines the quest for accountability, credibility and evidence in the public sector. It asks whether this quest may be understood in terms of neoliberal thinking and, if so, how? The book makes the argument that while current administrative reforms are informed by several distinct political rationalities, they evolve above all around a particular form of neoliberalism: constructivist neoliberalism. The book analyses the dangers of the kinds of administrative power seeking to invoke the self-steering capacities of society and administration itself.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Geopolitics
      April 2015

      1812 in the Americas

      by Editor(s): Jean-Marc Serme

      This book brings together a variety of interesting perspectives on the circumstances and effects of the war in 1812, offering a range of insights, from an exploration of the role religion played in the conflict to an investigation of low literature of the time reacted to it.The book is opened by a contribution from Adam Rothman, who examines the concept of the paracolonial republic to highlight that the US in 1812 was surrounded by monarchical colonial powers and used imperial means against its indigenous populations.In the second essay, Tangi Villerbu explores the way in which the Catholic Church set out to organize the space for its own development west of the Appalachian Mountains in the context of a continental war.Following this, John Dickinson explores the heart of the early hours of the conflict in his account of the northern borderland and the new sense of itself Canada gained after successfully defending its territory against US invasion. Using biography as an efficient type of narrative to account for the complex situations of Native American groups during the war, Sheri Shuck-Hall focuses on the fascinating character of William Weatherford,who joined the traditionalists despite his strong cultural and economic interests among the Muscogee/Creek metis class. This volume also contains an essay by Nelly André on revolutionary women in South America. She points out that too much emphasis on a military-political definition of history has pushed women into the corners of national narratives. Her essay presents a few of these remarkable, sometimes forgotten, heroes. American literature had not yet fully emerged in its own right in 1812. As Ed White demonstrates in his essay, novel production at the time was scant and failed to provide satisfactory accounts of the war. Instead, as the author argues, only poetry was able to keep pace with the flow of events and create national representations.In his essay, Marco Sioli considers the events of the period in their cultural dimensions. He looks at the ways in which the press shaped the perceptions of the war and helped devise a more affirmed national identity despite the poor record of American military deeds. The volume closes with inisghts into another genre that had a major impact on the discussions about going to war against the British Empire: the sermon. Lucia Bergamasco’s careful and close reading of such texts provides the reader with the arguments that shook the nation, such as sectional antagonism, slavery, and political and moral reformation.

    • Communication studies
      August 2016

      Transnational Worlds of Power Journal

      Proliferation of Journalism & Professional Standards Vol. 1. No. 1 2015

      by Editor(s): Ibrahim Saleh

      This journal has been discontinued. Any issues are available to purchase separately.

    • International relations
      July 2014

      The Koreas between China and Japan

      by Editor(s): Victor Teo, Lee Guen

      Most discussions pertaining to the nuclear proliferation and reunification issues on the Korean Peninsula privilege the position and role played by the United States. In the first volume of its kind, this collection of essays presents the challenges faced by the Koreas against the context of the changing relations between China and Japan. Strategically nestled between these political giants, the Korean Peninsula has traditionally been “seen” as a sphere of influence by Tokyo and Beijing. Regardless of the escalating difficulties in recent Sino-Japanese relations, this volume argues that avoiding all-out conflict and ensuring a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula are certainly strategic goals that both China and Japan still share. Neither China nor Japan wishes to be dragged into a war started by North Korean belligerence, South Korean aspirations or American adventurism. However, despite alternating between political pressure and diplomatic efforts, Japan and China have found it extremely difficult to guide the tone and direction of politics in intra-Korea affairs. Conversely, both South and North Korea have been extremely adept at fending off any perceived attempts to influence their domestic and foreign policies. Pyongyang and Seoul have shown remarkable political gumption and diplomatic skill, not only resisting Great Power influences but even managing to advance their political agendas in this very tempestuous neighbourhood. One fundamental question this volume addresses is whether the developments on the Korean Peninsula could and should be considered independently from developments in Sino-Japanese relations. Through addressing different dimensions of the interaction between the Koreas, China and Japan in the 21st Century, this volume makes a valuable contribution to study of the international relations of Northeast Asia.

    • Social & political philosophy
      April 2017

      A World Beyond Global Disorder

      The Courage to Hope

      by Editor(s): Fred Dallmayr, Edward Demenchonok

      A world which, like ours, has been ravaged by some sixty wars in recent decades, can rightly be described as the scene of global disorder. Even today, the same world is traumatized by hot and cold wars, proxy wars, and repeated outbursts of blood-filled mayhem, not to mention the threat of a nuclear holocaust unleashed by big power rivalries. These are not mere statistics, but wounds in the body of humanity, calling for healing and reconciliation. In biblical terms, human beings are not meant to be the owners or the destroyers of the world, but rather its custodians or caretakers. This collection is a summons to responsible care-taking, and it approaches the subject from an intercultural perspective in a variety of fields, including religion and politics. The topics covered range from accounts of major global calamities today to explorations of possible political, economic and societal reforms, and to the invocation of basic religious and philosophical resources needed for the recovery of a world beyond global disorder.

    • History
      September 2018

      No One is an Island

      An Icelandic Perspective

      by Editor(s): Giorgio Baruchello, Jakob Thor Kristjánsson, Kristín Margrét Jóhannsdóttir, Skafti Ingimarsson

      This book examines Iceland vis-à-vis international affairs, with special focus on immigration, foreign aid, Arctic policy, climate change and Iceland´s international image, identity and perception. All issues that play an important role in Iceland´s foreign and domestic policy. This book addresses Iceland as a small state from a variety of perspectives offered by academics and officials. In this book, the authors explore how Iceland’s domestic and international behaviour is marked by its smallness, suggesting that the Icelandic perspective is perhaps more idiosyncratic than international.

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