• Politics & government
      July 2015

      The Global Minotaur

      America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy

      by Yanis Varoufakis

      In this remarkable and provocative book, Yanis Varoufakis, former finance minister of Greece, explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a Global Minotaur was born. Today's deepening crisis in Europe is just one of the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global system which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. Going beyond this, Varoufakis reveals how we might reintroduce a modicum of reason into what has become a perniciously irrational economic order. An essential account of the socio-economic events and hidden histories that have shaped the world as we now know it

    • Geopolitics
      July 2014

      America's Deadliest Export

      Democracy - The Truth About US Foreign Policy and Everything Else

      by William Blum

      For over sixty-five years, the United States war machine has been on automatic pilot. Since World War II we have been conditioned to believe that America's motives in 'exporting' democracy are honorable, even noble. In this startling and provocative book, William Blum, a leading dissident chronicler of US foreign policy and the author of controversial bestseller Rogue State, argues that nothing could be further from the truth. Moreover, unless this fallacy is unlearned, and until people understand fully the worldwide suffering American policy has caused, we will never be able to stop the monster.

    • Development studies
      January 2015

      South Sudan: A Slow Liberation

      by Edward Thomas

      In 2011, South Sudan became an independent country. Its long liberation struggle was an attempt to right the wrongs of brutal colonial conquest, deliberate neglect and racial oppression organized by governments headquartered at Khartoum. The long struggle has had a violent aftermath. The war of liberation has been marked by looting, raids and massacres that pitted ethnic communities against each other. In this remarkably comprehensive work, Edward Thomas provides a multi-layered examination of what is happening in the country today. Writing from the perspective of South Sudan's most mutinous hinterland, Jonglei state, the book explains how this area was at the heart of South Sudan's liberation. Drawing on hundreds of interviews and a broad range of sources, this book gives a sharply focused, fresh account of South Sudan's long, unfinished struggle for liberation.

    • Sociology & anthropology
      March 2015

      The 1% and the Rest of Us

      A Political Economy of Dominant Ownership

      by Tim Di Muzio

      While the Occupy movement faces many strategic and organizational challenges, one of its major accomplishments has been to draw global attention to the massive disparity of income, wealth and privilege held by 1% of the population in nations across the world. In The 1% and the Rest of Us, Tim Di Muzio explores what it means to be part of a socio-economic order presided over by the super-rich and their political servants. Incorporating provocative and original arguments about philanthropy, social wealth and the political role of the super-rich, Di Muzio reveals how the 1% are creating a world unto themselves in which the accumulation of ever more money is really a symbolic drive to control society and the natural environment.

    • Development studies
      March 2015

      Spaces of Aid

      How Cars, Compounds and Hotels Shape Humanitarianism

      by Lisa Smirl

      Aid workers commonly bemoan that the spaces and experiences of working in 'the field' often sit uneasily with the goals they've signed up to: from visiting project sites in air-conditioned Land Cruisers while the intended beneficiaries walk barefoot through the heat, to checking emails from within gated compounds while surrounding communities have no running water. While such observations might seem intuitive, to date no concerted academic or policy study has dealt with the impact of these factors on theory or policy. Spaces of Aid provides the first book-length analysis of what has colloquially been referred to as Aid Land, exploring in depth two high-profile case studies - the Aceh tsunami and Hurricane Katrina - in order to uncover a fascinating history of the material objects that have become an endemic, expected, yet unexamined part of the aid landscape.

    • Political economy
      January 2014

      How Numbers Rule the World

      The Use and Abuse of Statistics in Global Politics

      by Lorenzo Fioramonti

      Numbers dominate global politics and, as a result, our everyday lives. Credit ratings steer financial markets and can make or break the future of entire nations. GDP drives our economies. Stock market indices flood our media and national debates. Statistical calculations define how we deal with climate change, poverty and sustainability. But what is behind these numbers? In How Numbers Rule the World, Lorenzo Fioramonti reveals the hidden agendas underpinning the use of statistics and those who control them. Most worryingly, he shows how numbers have been used as a means to reinforce the grip of markets on our social and political life, curtailing public participation and rational debate. An innovative and timely exposé of the politics, power and contestation of numbers.

    • Politics & government
      February 2013

      The Global Minotaur

      America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy

      by Yanis Varoufakis

      In this remarkable and provocative book, Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a 'Global Minotaur' was born. Just as the Athenians maintained a steady flow of tributes to the Cretan beast, so Europe and the rest of the world began sending incredible amounts of capital to America and Wall Street. Thus, the Global Minotaur became the 'engine' that pulled the world economy from the early 1980s through to the financial collapse of 2008.Today's deepening crisis in Europe is just one of the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global 'system' which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. Going beyond this, Varoufakis lays out the options available to us for reintroducing a modicum of reason into a highly irrational global economic order.An essential account of the socio-economic events and hidden histories that have shaped the world as we now know it.

    • Politics & government
      October 2015

      We Kill Because We Can

      From Soldiering to Assassination in the Drone Age

      by Laurie Calhoun

      Welcome to the Drone Age. Where self defence has become naked aggression. Where courage has become cowardice. Where black ops have become standard operating procedure. In this remarkable and often shocking book, Laurie Calhoun dissects the moral, psychological and cultural impact of remote-control killing in the Twenty-First Century. How can a mafia hitman be likened to a drone operator conducting a targeted killing? What difference, if any, is there between the Trayvon Martin case and the drone killing of a teen in Yemen? We Kill Because We Can takes a scalpel to the dark heart of Western foreign policy in order to answer these and many other disturbing questions.

    • Politics & government
      January 2016

      Power Politics

      How China and Russia Reshape the World

      by Rob de Wijk

      We tend to think of ourselves as living in a time when nations, for the most part, obey the rule of law - and where they certainly don't engage in the violent grabs for territory that have characterised so much of human history. But as Rob de Wijk shows in this book, power politics very much remains a force on the international scene. Offering analyses of such actions as Putin's annexation of the Crimea and China's attempts to claim large parts of the South China Sea, de Wijk explains why power politics never truly went away-and why, as the West's position weakens, it's likely to play a bigger and bigger role on the global stage in the coming years.

    • International business
      April 2016

      An Expert's Guide to International Protocol

      Best Practices in Diplomatic and Corporate Relations

      by Gilbert Monod De Froideville and Mark Verheul

      Although modern life grows increasingly casual, in many sectors, protocol still reigns supreme. An Expert's Guide to International Protocol offers an overview of its associated practices, including those found within the context of diplomatic relations and the business world. Focusing on a wide range of countries and cultures, the book covers topics like seating arrangements, the history and use of flags, ceremonies, invitations and dress codes, and gifts and decorations. Throughout, influential diplomatic, business, cultural, and sports figures share their own experiences with protocols around the world.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2016

      Reasserting America in the 1970s

      U.S. public diplomacy and the rebuilding of America’s image abroad

      by Hallvard Notaker, Giles Scott-Smith, David J. Snyder

      'Hallvard Notaker, Giles Scott-Smith, and David J. Snyder have brought together a superb collection of essays authored by first-rate historians. In particular, Reasserting America in the 1970s succeeds at showing how US public diplomats marketed the United States to a skeptical world in the aftermath of the Vietnam War and Watergate, and attempted to manage discourse through public and private cooperation, and how diplomats and foreign audiences interpreted the messages. The volume not only is an indispensable addition to the study of diplomatic history but is also timely, as it fits in nicely with the recent historiographical thrust that recognizes the 1970s as a pivotal decade in American history.' Brian R. Robertson, Texas A & M University, Central Texas, H-Diplo (March, 2017)

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2016

      The imperial premiership

      The role of the modern Prime Minister in foreign policy making, 1964–2015

      by Sam Goodman

      Recent votes in the House of Commons on British military intervention have put foreign policy at the heart of public consciousness. This book examines fifty years and nine premierships - from Harold Wilson to David Cameron - to offer a unique account of the growing role of the prime minister in foreign policy making. The prime minister now spends more time on foreign policy than at any previous period outside war, but excepting crises the public and MPs themselves remain relatively ill-informed on the subject. Written by a senior parliamentary researcher and based on first-hand interviews with former foreign secretaries, Cabinet ministers, senior civil servants, party officials, military chiefs and diplomats, this book provides an insider account of votes on military intervention in Syria, and raises questions around the vetting of those who seek the office of prime minister and the educating of the electorate.

    • International relations
      January 2017

      Strategy in War and Peace

      A Critical Introduction

      by Aaron Edwards

      Discover how strategic theory can be used to navigate the complex and uncertain international security environment that we live in today. Strategy is a central concept in international security, and one that travels across the academic disciplines of politics, international relations and history. By why is it so important? Aaron Edwards unpacks key strategic episodes from world history and politics to help you understand the role of strategy and the scholarly and policy debates surrounding it. Themes covered include: International relations • technology • ethics • irregular war (including counter-insurgency, counter-terrorism and hybrid warfare) • the resurgence of great power rivalries in the early 21st century • the rise of non-state actors Case studies include: Guerrilla warfare and strategy in regions from South East Asia to the Middle East • US nuclear strategy in the Cold War • Russian intervention in Ukraine • British strategy at the end of empire • the UN's role in resolving conflict after the Cold War • US-led coalition strategy in Afghanistan • the challenge posed by Al Qaeda and Islamic State/Daesh ; Aaron Edwards unpacks key strategic episodes from world history and politics to help you understand the role of strategy and the scholarly and policy debates surrounding it: from counter-insurgency to the rise of non-state actors, and from the end of the British empire to Daesh/Islamic State. ; Preface; Acknowledgements; Contents; Introduction; 1. What is Strategy?; 2. Ends and Means in Strategy; 3. The Practical Application of Strategy; 4. Strategy, Ethics and Restraint in War; 5. Strategy and the Utility of Force; 6. The Role of Strategy in Ending Wars and Building Peace; 7. Strategy Redux?; Conclusion; Notes; Glossary; Bibliography. ; PrefaceAcknowledgementsIntroduction What is Strategy? Ends and Means in Strategy The Practical Application of Strategy Strategy, Ethics and Restraint in War Strategy and the Utility of Force The Role of Strategy in Ending Wars and Building Peace Strategy Redux? ConclusionNotesGlossaryBibliography

    • International relations
      April 2016

      Security/Capital

      A General Theory of Pacification

      by George S. Rigakos

      What is security, and what is its relationship to capitalism? George S. Rigakos' explosive treatise charts the rise of the security-industrial complex. Starting from a critical appraisal of ‘productive labour’ in the works of Karl Marx and Adam Smith, Rigakos builds a conceptual model of pacification based on practices of dispossession, exploitation and the fetish of security commodities. Rigakos argues that a defining characteristic of the global economic system is its ability to productively sell (in)security to those it makes insecure. Materially and ideologically, the security-industrial complex is the blast furnace of global capitalism, fuelling the perpetuation of the system while feeding relentlessly on the surpluses it has exacted. ; Security has become the pre-eminent organising principle of modern life, inextricably bound up with capital accumulation and Empire. This is the first sociological treatise on the security-industrial complex, offering a general theory of security based on a critical engagement with the works of Marx and Foucault. ; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Security Under Capitalism; 1. Productive Labour; 2. Dispossession; 3. Exploitation; 4. The Security Commodity; 5. Security is Hegemony; 6. The Productivity of Security; Conclusions: Security After Capitalism; Bibliography; Index.

    • International relations
      March 2016

      The Concept of the State in International Relations

      Philosophy, Sovereignty and Cosmopolitanism

      by Robert Schuett, Peter M. R. Stirk

      The concept of the state plays a central role in international relations, particularly in realist and neo-realist approaches. Yet, the meaning of the state is persistently taken to be self-evident by both advocates of the sovereign state and its critics. This volume counters this trend. It systematically considers the nature of the state, the concept of sovereignty and the challenges globalisation and cosmopolitanism. Featuring contributions from some of the most reputed theorists of the state, the essays in this collection give you a coherent and, at the same time, distinctively pluralist set of original reflections on the role and nature of the state. ; This volume systematically considers the nature of the state, the concept of sovereignty and the challenges globalisation and cosmopolitanism. With contributions from reputed theorists of the state, the essays in this collection give you a distinctively pluralist set of original reflections on the role and nature of the state. ; Introduction: The Concept of the State in International Relations, Peter M.R. Stirk; Chapter 1: International Law and Statehood: A Performative View, Janis Grzybowski & Martti Koskenniemi; Chapter 2: The State as a Universe of Discourse, Peter J. Steinberger; Chapter 3: Sovereignty and the Personality of the State, Jens Bartelson; Chapter 4: The State as Urban Myth: Governance without Government in the Global South, Oliver Jütersonke and Moncef Kartas; Chapter 5: ‘Decolonizing Sovereignty: Globalisation and the Return of Hyper-Sovereignty’, John M. Hobson; Chapter 6: The Concept of the State as a Community of Liability, Peter M.R. Stirk; Chapter 7: From Global Governance to Global Stateness, William E. Scheuerman; Conclusion: Open Societies, Cosmopolitanism, and the State as a Safeguard against Nationalism, Robert Schuett

    • Warfare & defence
      August 2017

      A History of Military Occupation from 1792 to 1914

      by Peter M. R. Stirk

      An understanding of military occupation as a distinct phenomenon first emerged in the 18th century. This book shows how this understanding developed and the problems that the occupiers, the occupied, commentators and the courts encountered. It covers all major occupations including: France, Sicily, Greece, Belgium, Syria, Mexico, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cyprus, Egypt, Korea, Peking, the Boer Republics; Latin America; and those related to the Napoleonic Wars, the Mexican-American War, the American Civil War, the Franco-Prussian War, the Russo-Turkish War, and the Spanish-American War ; An understanding of military occupation as a distinct phenomenon first emerged in the 18th century. This book shows how this understanding developed and the problems that the occupiers, the occupied, commentators and the courts encountered. ; Introduction: From Conquest to Occupation; 1. The Era of the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars; 2. European Occupations before 1870; 3. Military occupation and America: expansion and civil war; 4. The Franco-German war and occupation of France; 5. Codification of a Law of Occupation; 6. Occupations to the Eve of the First World War; 7. Occupations by the United States of America and the Spanish-American War; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index.

    • Political ideologies
      August 2017

      Post-Liberal Peace Transitions

      Between Peace Formation and State Formation

      by Oliver P. Richmond, Sandra Pogodda

      Why is it that states emerging from intervention, peacebuilding and statebuilding over the last 25 years appear to be ‘failed by design’? This study explores the interplay of local peace agency with the (neo)liberal peacebuilding project. And it looks at how far can local ‘peace formation’ dynamics can go to counteract the forces of violence and play a role in rebuilding the state, consolidate peace processes and induce a more progressive form of politics. By looking at local agency related to peace formation, Oliver Richmond and Sandra Pogodda find answers to the pressing question of how large-scale peacebuilding or statebuilding may be significantly improved and made more representative of the lives, needs, rights, and ambitions of its subjects. ; This book looks at the local agency related to peace formation in order to find answers to the pressing question of how large-scale peacebuilding or statebuilding may be significantly improved and made more representative of the lives, needs, rights, and ambitions of its subjects. ; Introduction: The contradictions of peace, international architecture, the state, and local agency, Oliver P. Richmond & Sandra Pogodda; Chapter 1 Lock out: Peace formation in Northern Ireland, Roger Mac Ginty; Chapter 2 Bosnia-Herzegovina: Domestic Agency and the Inadequacy of the Liberal Peace, Jasmin Ramovic, Stefanie Kappler & Roberto Belloni; Chapter 3, Peace Multitudes: Liberal Peace, Local Agency, and Peace Formation in Kosovo, Gezim Visoka; Chapter 4 Engendering the Post-liberal Peace in Cyprus: UNSC Resolution 1325 as a Tool, Olga Demetriou & Maria Hadjipavlou; Chapter 5 Peace formation versus everyday state formation in Palestine, Sandra Pogodda & Oliver P Richmond; Chapter 6 Afghanistan’s Post-Liberal Peace: between external intervention and local efforts, Martine van Bijlert;Chapter 7 International interventions and local agency in peacebuilding in Sierra Leone, Morten Bøås & Patrick Tom; Chapter 8 Local Spaces for Peace in Cambodia?, Eng Netra and Caroline Hughes; Chapter 9 Timor-Leste: Building on local governance structures: embedding UN peace efforts from within, Paula Duarte Lopes; Chapter 10 Incompatibility, substitution or complementarity? Interrogating relationships between international, state and non-state peace agents in post-conflict Solomon Islands, Volker Boege

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