• Political science & theory
      November 2002

      Case Against the Democratic State

      An Essay in Cultural Criticism

      by Graham, Gordon, A01

      The history of the last two hundred years is a story of the immense and relentless growth of the State at the expense of other social institutions. We are now so familiar and accepting of the State's pre-eminence in all things, that few think to...

    • Media, information & communication industries
      April 2000

      Free to Be Human

      Intellectual Self-defence in an Age of Illusions

      by David Edwards

      This is a book about freedom, and above all about the idea that there is often no greater obstacle to freedom than the assumption that it has already been fully attained. While in the West few individuals today suffer physical restraint by the state, we are still constrained by powerful psychological chains?ùwhich are in many ways far more effective, if only because they are so difficult to perceive. Influential writers such as Noam Chomsky and Edward Herman have shown that the corporately controlled mass media of Western democracies serve as a giant filter system favouring powerful state and business interests: what we receive as ?æobjective news?Æ about domestic politics, human rights and environmental issues, is in fact an extremely partial and biased view of the world. Free to be Human shows how the same filter system distorts our understanding of many personal, ethical and spiritual issues, ensuring that we remain passive, conformist, confused and uninformed?ùand willing to accept the irrational values of corporate consumerism. David Edwards argues that, in order to counter this continual process of disinformation and disempowerment, we need to master the arts of ?æintellectual self-defence?Æ and so become able to challenge the deceptions of a system that subordinates people and planet to the drive for profit.

    • Literary studies: general
      August 2008

      Against Democracy

      Literary Experience in the Era of Emancipations

      by Simon During

    • Literary studies: general
      August 2008

      Against Democracy

      Literary Experience in the Era of Emancipations

      by Simon During

    • History
      July 2015

      Tocqueville, Jansenism, and the Necessity of the Political in a Democratic Age

      Building a Republic for the Moderns

      by David Selby

      This engaging work exploring the influence of Jansenism on Alexis de Tocqueville’s life and works is the most comprehensive treatment of the subject to date. More than just an intellectual biography, the author demonstrates that once this Jansenist connection is understood, Tocqueville’s political thought can be applied in new and surprising ways. Moving from the historical sociology of Jansenism in seventeenth and eighteenth-century France to contemporary debates over the human right to education, the role of religion in democracy, and the nature of political freedom, Selby brings Tocqueville out of the past in order to make him relevant to the present. Holding valuable lessons for historians as well as political scientists and sociologists, this fresh new interpretation of Alexis de Tocqueville’s political thought is a reminder that there is still much to learn from the great theorist of democracy.

    • Political structures: democracy
      November 2015

      Beasts and Gods

      How democracy changed its meaning and lost its purpose

      by Roslyn Fuller

      Democracy does not deliver on the things we have assumed are its natural outcomes. Equal opportunity and the individual’s ability to have an impact on decision-making are a mirage. This, coupled with a growing sense of malaise in both new and established democracies forms the basis to the assertion made by some, that these are not democracies at all. Through considerable, impressive empirical analysis of a variety of voting methods, across twenty different nations, Roslyn Fuller presents the data that makes this contention indisputable. Proving that the party which forms the government rarely receives the majority of the popular vote, that electoral systems regularly produce manufactured majorities and that the better funded side invariably wins such contests in both elections and referenda, Fuller’s findings challenge the most fundamental elements of both national politics and broader society. Coupled with a radical and rigorous reviewing of modern limitations on representation and participation at the national level, Fuller goes on to show how restrictions compound at the international level, as delegated power is delegated yet again. But there is hope for our world. Beast and Gods argues for a return to democracy as perceived by the ancient Athenians. Boldly arguing for the necessity of the Aristotelian assumption that citizens are agents whose wishes and aims can be attained through participation in politics, and through an examination of what “goods” are provided by democracy, Fuller offers a powerful challenge to the contemporary liberal view that there are no "goods" in politics, only individual citizens seeking to fulfil their particular interests. An extraordinary work, set to reconfigure the very foundations of modern society.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2010

      Bounded rationality in decision-making

      How cognitive shortcuts and professional values may interfere with market-based regulation

      by Helle Nielsen, Mikael Anderssen, Duncan Liefferink

      Challenging standard economic models, this book shows how farmers tend to use cognitive shortcuts in their decision-making and how their professional pride frequently outweighs profit considerations. This indicates that environmental regulation based on economic incentives may not be as effective as economic theorists and ex ante policy analysts maintain. Rather than assuming that regulations respond to incentive-based policies, this book examines the ways in which they do. Bounded rationality in decision-making has typically been studied in a laboratory setting, but this book uses original empirical research to demonstrate how bounded rationality plays out in the real world, examining the responses of Danish farmers to fertiliser regulation and their decision-making processes. The book will be of interest to a broad range of scholars within the fields of public policy, public administration, political science, behavioural economics and sociology. ;

    • Political structures: democracy
      July 2006

      Democracy in Scandinavia

      Consensual, majoritarian or mixed?

      by David Arter

      This book is about the distinctive features of Scandinavian democracy, the state of Scandinavian democracy and the classification of the Scandinavian democracies. It breaks new ground in challenging the established status of the Scandinavian countries as 'consensus model democracies'. The book poses three main questions. First, what are the distinctive features of the five Scandinavian political systems when compared with the Westminster model of democracy? Next, how well does the evidence from recent commissions suggest that Scandinavian democracy is working in practice? Finally, is Scandinavian democracy consensual, majoritarian or mixed? The nature of legislative-executive relations is explored, with a particular focus on the role of the parliamentary opposition and its involvement in policy-making. The central conclusion is that all the Nordic states are majoritarian democracies, albeit with varying amounts of consensual legislative behaviour.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2006

      Democracy in Scandinavia

      Consensual, majoritarian or mixed?

      by David Arter, Bill Jones

      This book is about the distinctive features of Scandinavian democracy, the state of Scandinavian democracy and the classification of the Scandinavian democracies. It breaks new ground in challenging the established status of the Scandinavian countries as 'consensus model democracies'. The book poses three main questions. First, what are the distinctive features of the five Scandinavian political systems when compared with the Westminster model of democracy? Next, how well does the evidence from recent commissions suggest that Scandinavian democracy is working in practice? Finally, is Scandinavian democracy consensual, majoritarian or mixed? The nature of legislative-executive relations is explored, with a particular focus on the role of the parliamentary opposition and its involvement in policy-making. The central conclusion is that all the Nordic states are majoritarian democracies, albeit with varying amounts of consensual legislative behaviour. ;

    • Political structures: democracy
      July 2013

      Regulating lobbying: a global comparison

      by Raj Chari, John Hogan, Gary Murphy

      In an age of corruption, sleaze and scandal associated with financial crisis and economic downturn across the globe, citizens want more transparency and accountability in politics. This book examines a principal means by which this can be achieved: the regulation of lobbyists. It provides innovative insights into lobbying regulations across four continents - North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. What are these regulations about? What are the differences across the continents? How effective are the rules? How have they changed the lobbying profession? Using qualitative and quantitative analyses, the book compares and contrasts regulatory laws in the US, Canada, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Hungary, the EU, Taiwan and Australia.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2012

      Regulating lobbying: a global comparison

      by Raj Chari, Dimitris Papadimitriou, John Hogan, Simon Bulmer, Gary Murphy, Andrew Geddes, Peter Humphreys

      In an age of corruption, sleaze and scandal associated with financial crisis and economic downturn across the globe, citizens want more transparency and accountability in politics. Available in paperback due to popular demand, this book examines a principal means by which this can be achieved: the regulation of lobbyists. It provides innovative insights into lobbying regulations across four continents - North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. What are these regulations about? What are the differences across the continents? How effective are the rules? How have they changed the lobbying profession? Using qualitative and quantitative analyses, the book compares and contrasts regulatory laws in the US, Canada, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Hungary, the EU, Taiwan and Australia. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2010

      Regulating lobbying: a global comparison

      by Raj Chari, Dimitris Papadimitriou, John Hogan, Simon Bulmer, Gary Murphy, Andrew Geddes, Peter Humphreys

      In an age of corruption, sleaze and scandal associated with financial crisis and economic downturn across the globe, citizens want more transparency and accountability in politics. This book examines a principal means by which this can be achieved: the regulation of lobbyists. It provides innovative insights into lobbying regulations across four continents - North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. What are these regulations about? What are the differences across the continents? How effective are the rules? How have they changed the lobbying profession? Using qualitative and quantitative analyses, the book compares and contrasts regulatory laws in the US, Canada, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Hungary, the EU, Taiwan and Australia. ;

    • Political structures: democracy
      January 2014

      Rescaling the state

      Devolution and the geographies of economic governance

      by Mark Goodwin, Martin Jones, Rhys Jones

      Rescaling the state provides a theoretically-informed and empirically-rich account of the process of devolution undertaken in the UK since 1997, focusing in particular on the devolution of economic governance. Using case studies from England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, the book examines the purported reasons for, and the unintended consequences of, devolution. As well as comparing policy and practice across the four devolved territories, the book also explores the pitfalls and instances of good practice associated with devolution in the UK. Rescaling the state is an important text for all social scientists - particularly political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists and human geographers - interested in the devolution of power in the UK and, indeed, all instances of contemporary state restructuring. It is also a significant book for all policy-makers interested in understanding the increasing complexity of the policy landscapes of economic governance in the UK.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2012

      Rescaling the state

      Devolution and the geographies of economic governance

      by Mark Goodwin, Martin Jones, Rhys Jones

      Rescaling the state provides a theoretically-informed and empirically-rich account of the process of devolution undertaken in the UK since 1997, focusing in particular on the devolution of economic governance. Using case studies from England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, the book examines the purported reasons for, and the unintended consequences of, devolution. As well as comparing policy and practice across the four devolved territories, the book also explores the pitfalls and instances of good practice associated with devolution in the UK. Rescaling the state is an important text for all social scientists - particularly political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists and human geographers - interested in the devolution of power in the UK and, indeed, all instances of contemporary state restructuring. It is also a significant book for all policy-makers interested in understanding the increasing complexity of the policy landscapes of economic governance in the UK. ;

    • Political structures: democracy

      Public Things

      Democracy in Disrepair

      by Bonnie Honig

      In the contemporary world of neoliberalism, efficiency is treated as the vehicle of political and economic health .State bureaucracy, but not corporate bureaucracy, is seen as inefficient, and privatization is seen as a magic cure for social ills. In Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair, Bonnie Honig asks whether democracy is possible in the absence of public services, spaces, and utilities. In other words, if neoliberalism leaves to democracy merely electoral majoritarianism and procedures of deliberation while divesting democratic states of their ownership of public things, what will the impact be?_x000B__x000B_Following Tocqueville, who extolled the virtues of “pursuing in common the objects of common desires,” Honig focuses not on the demos but on the objects of democratic life. Democracy, as she points out, postulates public things—infrastructure, monuments, libraries—that citizens use, care for, repair, and are gathered up by. To be “gathered up” refers to the work of D. W. Winnicott, the object relations psychoanalyst who popularized the idea of “transitional objects”—the toys, teddy bears, or favorite blankets by way of which infants come to understand themselves as unified selves with an inside and an outside in relation to others. The wager of Public Things is that the work transitional objects do for infants is analogously performed for democratic citizens by public things, which press us into object relations with others and with ourselves._x000B__x000B_Public Things attends also to the historically racial character of public things: public lands taken from indigenous peoples, access to public goods restricted to white majorities. Drawing on Hannah Arendt, who saw how things fabricated by humans lend stability to the human world, Honig shows how Arendt and Winnicott—both theorists of livenesss—underline the material and psychological conditions necessary for object permanence and the reparative work needed for a more egalitarian democracy.

    • Political structures: democracy

      Public Things

      Democracy in Disrepair

      by Bonnie Honig

      In the contemporary world of neoliberalism, efficiency is treated as the vehicle of political and economic health .State bureaucracy, but not corporate bureaucracy, is seen as inefficient, and privatization is seen as a magic cure for social ills. In Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair, Bonnie Honig asks whether democracy is possible in the absence of public services, spaces, and utilities. In other words, if neoliberalism leaves to democracy merely electoral majoritarianism and procedures of deliberation while divesting democratic states of their ownership of public things, what will the impact be?_x000B__x000B_Following Tocqueville, who extolled the virtues of “pursuing in common the objects of common desires,” Honig focuses not on the demos but on the objects of democratic life. Democracy, as she points out, postulates public things—infrastructure, monuments, libraries—that citizens use, care for, repair, and are gathered up by. To be “gathered up” refers to the work of D. W. Winnicott, the object relations psychoanalyst who popularized the idea of “transitional objects”—the toys, teddy bears, or favorite blankets by way of which infants come to understand themselves as unified selves with an inside and an outside in relation to others. The wager of Public Things is that the work transitional objects do for infants is analogously performed for democratic citizens by public things, which press us into object relations with others and with ourselves._x000B__x000B_Public Things attends also to the historically racial character of public things: public lands taken from indigenous peoples, access to public goods restricted to white majorities. Drawing on Hannah Arendt, who saw how things fabricated by humans lend stability to the human world, Honig shows how Arendt and Winnicott—both theorists of livenesss—underline the material and psychological conditions necessary for object permanence and the reparative work needed for a more egalitarian democracy.

    • Political structures: democracy

      Public Things

      Democracy in Disrepair

      by Bonnie Honig

      In the contemporary world of neoliberalism, efficiency is treated as the vehicle of political and economic health .State bureaucracy, but not corporate bureaucracy, is seen as inefficient, and privatization is seen as a magic cure for social ills. In Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair, Bonnie Honig asks whether democracy is possible in the absence of public services, spaces, and utilities. In other words, if neoliberalism leaves to democracy merely electoral majoritarianism and procedures of deliberation while divesting democratic states of their ownership of public things, what will the impact be?_x000B__x000B_Following Tocqueville, who extolled the virtues of “pursuing in common the objects of common desires,” Honig focuses not on the demos but on the objects of democratic life. Democracy, as she points out, postulates public things—infrastructure, monuments, libraries—that citizens use, care for, repair, and are gathered up by. To be “gathered up” refers to the work of D. W. Winnicott, the object relations psychoanalyst who popularized the idea of “transitional objects”—the toys, teddy bears, or favorite blankets by way of which infants come to understand themselves as unified selves with an inside and an outside in relation to others. The wager of Public Things is that the work transitional objects do for infants is analogously performed for democratic citizens by public things, which press us into object relations with others and with ourselves._x000B__x000B_Public Things attends also to the historically racial character of public things: public lands taken from indigenous peoples, access to public goods restricted to white majorities. Drawing on Hannah Arendt, who saw how things fabricated by humans lend stability to the human world, Honig shows how Arendt and Winnicott—both theorists of livenesss—underline the material and psychological conditions necessary for object permanence and the reparative work needed for a more egalitarian democracy.

    • Political structures: democracy

      Public Things

      Democracy in Disrepair

      by Bonnie Honig

      In the contemporary world of neoliberalism, efficiency is treated as the vehicle of political and economic health .State bureaucracy, but not corporate bureaucracy, is seen as inefficient, and privatization is seen as a magic cure for social ills. In Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair, Bonnie Honig asks whether democracy is possible in the absence of public services, spaces, and utilities. In other words, if neoliberalism leaves to democracy merely electoral majoritarianism and procedures of deliberation while divesting democratic states of their ownership of public things, what will the impact be?_x000B__x000B_Following Tocqueville, who extolled the virtues of “pursuing in common the objects of common desires,” Honig focuses not on the demos but on the objects of democratic life. Democracy, as she points out, postulates public things—infrastructure, monuments, libraries—that citizens use, care for, repair, and are gathered up by. To be “gathered up” refers to the work of D. W. Winnicott, the object relations psychoanalyst who popularized the idea of “transitional objects”—the toys, teddy bears, or favorite blankets by way of which infants come to understand themselves as unified selves with an inside and an outside in relation to others. The wager of Public Things is that the work transitional objects do for infants is analogously performed for democratic citizens by public things, which press us into object relations with others and with ourselves._x000B__x000B_Public Things attends also to the historically racial character of public things: public lands taken from indigenous peoples, access to public goods restricted to white majorities. Drawing on Hannah Arendt, who saw how things fabricated by humans lend stability to the human world, Honig shows how Arendt and Winnicott—both theorists of livenesss—underline the material and psychological conditions necessary for object permanence and the reparative work needed for a more egalitarian democracy.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2017

      Rescaling the state

      Devolution and the geographies of economic governance

      by Mark Goodwin, Martin Jones, Rhys Jones

      Rescaling the state provides a theoretically-informed and empirically-rich account of the process of devolution undertaken in the UK since 1997, focusing in particular on the devolution of economic governance. Using case studies from England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, the book examines the purported reasons for, and the unintended consequences of, devolution. As well as comparing policy and practice across the four devolved territories, the book also explores the pitfalls and instances of good practice associated with devolution in the UK. Rescaling the state is an important text for all social scientists - particularly political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists and human geographers - interested in the devolution of power in the UK and, indeed, all instances of contemporary state restructuring. It is also a significant book for all policy-makers interested in understanding the increasing complexity of the policy landscapes of economic governance in the UK.

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