• Educational equipment & technology, computer-aided learning (CAL)
      March 2015

      Redesigning Learning Spaces

      by Erin Klein, Thomas C. Murray, A.J. Juliani, and Ben Gilpin

    • Education
      June 2016

      Educating and Supporting Girls with Asperger's and Autism

      A resource for education and health professionals

      by Victoria Honeybourne

      This resource is designed to support education and health professionals to better understand how autism (including Asperger's syndrome) presents in girls. It explains the various difficulties and disadvantages they face in educational settings and provides strategies to overcome them. While supplying background information and theory, it also offers practical strategies for working with girls on the autism spectrum. The resource comes equipped with a broad range of worksheets and activities on key issues: self-awareness, preparing for school life, learning, wider school life, preparing for employment and preparing for further study. Other features include: Illustrated throughout with real-life quotes and case studies Guidance on best practices when working with girls with autism spectrum conditions Activities and resources for young females on the autism spectrum to support them in developing self-awareness, coping strategies and learning skills Uses ideas and strategies from the field of positive psychology Supports educational establishments in creating environments which enable females on the autism spectrum to fulfil their potential.

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties
      September 2015

      Talkabout for Teenagers

      Developing Social & Emotional Communication Skills

      by Alex Kelly, Brian Sains

      A complete groupwork resource offering a hierarchical approach to teaching social and relationship skills to teenagers. Designed specifically for teenagers, this practical workbook provides ready-made material for running social and relationship skills groups with older children and young adults. Divided into five, hierarchical modules – self awareness and self esteem; body language; conversational skills; friendship skills; assertiveness skills– each module includes a teaching plan with worksheets and photocopiable resources. Includes a short assessment to highlight the module that is most appropriate to teach and the skills within that module that are relevant. Provides a short guide to running successful social skills groups, for example, the numbers for each group, group rules, developing group cohesion, how to set up a role play. The Talkabout series is an extremely successful, hierarchical approach to teaching social skills and Talkabout for Teenagers is ideal for all professionals working with teenagers with social, emotional or behavioural difficulties.

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties
      April 2008

      Practical Ideas for Emotional Intelligence

      by Jacqui Blades, Adele Clark

      This book covers a wide range of emotional literacy topics relevant to todays young people and can be used in any setting by learning mentors and other professionals. Each topic includes group and individual session activities, solutions to problems, take home tasks and tips for the professional. It can be used when designing and implementing individual behaviour plans (IEPs) and helping young people overcome the challenges in life. The topics covered are: profiling, changing, behavioural change, self-esteem, bereavement, family change, study skills, stress busting, motivation, self learning, drug awareness, bullying, school refusal and frustration. The book contains ideas and suggestions which can be readily adapted by the professional to best suit their setting It is one of the few resources which cover all aspects of emotional intelligence for all ability groups

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties
      October 2008

      Behaviour 4 My Future

      by Susie Davis

      An emotional literacy programme for students at risk of exclusion. This highly practical emotional literacy resource engages young people and motivates them to improve their behaviour at school. It consists of 13 well structured sessions that have been designed to appeal to different learning styles and to encourage the development of the key skills and attitudes associated with emotional literacy. The sessions include: An audit of sutdents' work and behaviour Linking feelings, thinkings and behaviour Managing stress and anger in the classroom Understanding and profiling students' multiple intelligences Linking behaviour to future opportunities. Suitable for one-to-one and group work, this book includes set-up guidelines, photocopiable worksheets and a CD Rom. Each session is linked to the secondary SEAL outcomes.

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties
      March 2008

      Its OK to be me

      by Annie Hamlaoui

      Workbook aimed at raising self-awareness and self-esteem. This is a practical workbook which takes children through a four-start guided journey: 1. Where am I now? A chance to find out more about myself and what makes me the person I am 2. Where do I want to be? Deciding how I would like things to be now and in the future 3. What are my next steps? What changes do I need to make? 4. How will I take those steps? Making a plan of action. The workbook offers opportunities to create a personal profile by identifying qualities and achievements and also an action plan for change. Can be used on a one-to-one basis and in small and large groups.

    • Education: care & counselling of students
      January 2009

      50 Top Tips for Managing Behaviour

      by Dave Stott

      A practical resource that utilises the SEBS philosophy (Teaching Social, Emotional and Behavioural Skills). With a very 'hands-on' approach to managing behaviour all the scenarios in this resource are taken from real-life situations and can be used during staff training or simply as a reference book. The book reflects situations that confront educational professionals on a day-to-day basis: How to manage the student who always wants the last word Setting boundaries . Managing anger, including your own . Dealing with difficult parents . Successful lunchtimes . Creating an emotionally literate environment . Behaviour plans . Building self-esteem . Coping with difficult colleagues. A brilliant resource to have as part of an induction pack or as an essential companion to continuing professional development. All key stages.

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties
      August 2012

      Behaviour, Safety and Well Being

      by Andrew Moffat

      The new Ofsted framework evaluates the behaviour and safety of pupils at the school. This resource provides over 100 lesson plans promoting : • Recognition of different emotions and behaviours• Practice in responding to those different emotions and behaviours• Good behaviour towards, and respect for, other young people and adults Each lesson plan is linked to a children’s book and references SEAL. Lessons can support Literacy, PSHE and citizenship. Lesson plans are bracketed into year groups and five or six- week modules that give schools the opportunity to deliver specific projects on anti-bullying / safeguarding, pupil voice and transition. There are also modules covering emotions such as anger, loneliness, excitement, jealousy, kindness, pride and confidence. A comprehensive, accessible and invaluable tool for every classroom.

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties
      November 2016

      Social Stories for Kids in Conflict Second Edition

      by John Ling

      'Social Stories for Kids in Conflict' is a practical guide to help young people improve their behaviour. Designed to help all those who work and/or live with young people who have difficulties with their behaviours and relationships with others, this book is a practical guide to help young people become more aware of their behaviour and its effect on other people. Focusing on mediation (including communication, the unblocking of channels, the breaking down of barriers, the righting of wrongs, making amends, and restorative justice), the book includes: · Dialogues used by a neutral person to highlight difficulties and possible changes in behaviour. · Cartoons and other visual techniques that can be used to present alternative ways to discuss problems. · Examples of social stories covering personal stuff, daily routines, home life, social skills, homework, work and playtime, PE and games, as well as a guide to writing your own social stories. · Powerpoint presentation for staff, parents and carers. Developed from work with children and young people with Autism, Asperger Syndrome, and related conditions, as well as troubled young people with no named condition, the ideas and techniques, can be used and modified to help all young people to become more aware of their behaviour and its effect on other people. This 2nd edition has been revised and updated and now includes an expanded section of social stories.

    • Education
      December 2011

      Special Needs: What to know and what to do

      The professional development file for all staff

      by Ruth MacConville

      Comprehensive and essential resource file for teachers. What to know and what to do deals with: Autism Deaf / Blind impairments Hearing impairments Learning difficulties Physical disabilities Specific learning disabilities Speech and language difficulties Visual impairment.

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties
      April 2012

      Behaviour Diaries

      An Assessment Tool for Supporting Children with Behavioural Difficulties

      by Sue Gott

      This invaluable resource provides a sophisticated technique for teachers to observe, assess, plan and evaluate to improve pupil behaviour. The book recognises the diverse demands of the modern classroom and explores ways in which asking the right question can help in the development of effective solutions. This resource will: Develop a more rigour approach to the tracking and assessment of behaviour related issues Deepen understanding about biological, psychological and social factors influencing behaviour Give examples of reflective and diagnostic practice, informing planning for successful interventions Explore ways of collecting appropriate information to support requests for interventions from other agencies. The pack includes a CD Rom with reflective tasks, diagnostic tools, illustrative poems and a staff Powerpoint for professional development sessions.

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties
      April 2012

      Challenging Behaviours - What to know and what to do

      The professional development file for all staff

      by Andrew Chadwick

      If you deal with challenging behaviours this book includes strategies covering a range of special needs including autistic spectrum, aspergers, dyspraxia, dyslexia, depression, tourettes, obsessive compulsive disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and specific learning difficulties. It addresses problems such as: Truanting Swearing and verbal abuse Theft Bullying Attention seeking Drug abuse Low self-esteem Vandalism. Includes case histories to provide some insight into the difficult situations teachers may encounter in the classroom.

    • Teaching of specific groups & persons with special educational needs
      November 2014

      Transferring the Notion of Good Practice when Working with Pupils with Emotional, Behavioural and Social Difficulties in a Cypriot Educational Context

      by Author(s): Stella Tryfonos

      Pupils with Social, Emotional and Behaviour Difficulties (often known as SEBD and EBD) comprise a group of learners who present challenges to their educators and the educational system; often, working with these pupils can be challenging and stressful for their teachers, as well as any professional involved. In England, research concerning the education and learning of pupils with SEBD has progressed considerably in the past three decades, and ‘good practice’ when working with pupils who present these difficulties has been widely investigated. In Cyprus, however, it is not nearly so widely known about and has not been researched to any great extent. This book explores the situation in the Cypriot education system, and begins by expanding the reader’s knowledge on developments on the education of those pupils whose behaviour raises challenges to the educational system and causes concerns to those involved. The book is informed by research which was undertaken by the author in Cyprus, and documents the views of educators and professionals on good practice. It explores the microsystem of a school, and will enrich the knowledge and understanding of those with personal and professional interests in working with these pupils to be ready to accommodate their needs. The book also contributes to a better understanding of the nature of SEBD, especially since the number of students presenting such difficulties in Cypriot primary education requires practitioners to be ready to provide the best practices possible.

    • Education: care & counselling of students
      August 2011

      The Supportive School

      Wellbeing and the Young Adolescent

      by Author(s): John Gray, Maurice Galton, Colleen McLaughlin, Barbie Clarke and Jennifer Symonds

      The Supportive School tackles some important contemporary issues of interest to teachers, parents and policy-makers alike. There is a widespread perception across the developed world that the social and emotional wellbeing of young people has been in decline in recent years and that various problem behaviours are on the rise. Because children spend so much of their time in educational institutions, schools are assumed to be part of the problem. But how precisely do schools affect young adolescents’ wellbeing? This book aims to answer that question.The book brings together for the first time the results of over 300 research studies, both from the UK and further afield. It identifies the key factors related to schooling which impact upon young people’s development and affect their wellbeing. These include: the extent to which they feel ‘connected’ with school, their relationships with teachers and with their peers, their sense of the school as a learning community, and the ways in which they respond to the pressures of academic work. What matters is how schools bring these elements together to create a strong ‘culture of support’.The Supportive School documents how schools handle young people, particularly at the key transition point from primary to secondary school, as well as the ways in which they respond to their pastoral and other concerns. It also places the UK’s much-criticised ‘performance’ on wellbeing issues in an international context and asks challenging questions about how far the UK is lagging behind.Schools are currently under considerable pressure to give greater attention to issues of wellbeing. The overriding message from The Supportive School is that how schools approach these issues can make a difference to young people’s lives and emotional wellbeing.

    • Education: care & counselling of students
      August 2011

      The Supportive School

      Wellbeing and the Young Adolescent

      by Author(s): John Gray, Maurice Galton, Colleen McLaughlin, Barbie Clarke and Jennifer Symonds

      The Supportive School tackles some important contemporary issues of interest to teachers, parents and policy-makers alike. There is a widespread perception across the developed world that the social and emotional wellbeing of young people has been in decline in recent years and that various problem behaviours are on the rise. Because children spend so much of their time in educational institutions, schools are assumed to be part of the problem. But how precisely do schools affect young adolescents’ wellbeing? This book aims to answer that question.The book brings together for the first time the results of over 300 research studies, both from the UK and further afield. It identifies the key factors related to schooling which impact upon young people’s development and affect their wellbeing. These include: the extent to which they feel ‘connected’ with school, their relationships with teachers and with their peers, their sense of the school as a learning community, and the ways in which they respond to the pressures of academic work. What matters is how schools bring these elements together to create a strong ‘culture of support’.The Supportive School documents how schools handle young people, particularly at the key transition point from primary to secondary school, as well as the ways in which they respond to their pastoral and other concerns. It also places the UK’s much-criticised ‘performance’ on wellbeing issues in an international context and asks challenging questions about how far the UK is lagging behind.Schools are currently under considerable pressure to give greater attention to issues of wellbeing. The overriding message from The Supportive School is that how schools approach these issues can make a difference to young people’s lives and emotional wellbeing.

    • Teaching of specific groups & persons with special educational needs
      November 2014

      Transferring the Notion of Good Practice when Working with Pupils with Emotional, Behavioural and Social Difficulties in a Cypriot Educational Context

      by Author(s): Stella Tryfonos

      Pupils with Social, Emotional and Behaviour Difficulties (often known as SEBD and EBD) comprise a group of learners who present challenges to their educators and the educational system; often, working with these pupils can be challenging and stressful for their teachers, as well as any professional involved. In England, research concerning the education and learning of pupils with SEBD has progressed considerably in the past three decades, and ‘good practice’ when working with pupils who present these difficulties has been widely investigated. In Cyprus, however, it is not nearly so widely known about and has not been researched to any great extent. This book explores the situation in the Cypriot education system, and begins by expanding the reader’s knowledge on developments on the education of those pupils whose behaviour raises challenges to the educational system and causes concerns to those involved. The book is informed by research which was undertaken by the author in Cyprus, and documents the views of educators and professionals on good practice. It explores the microsystem of a school, and will enrich the knowledge and understanding of those with personal and professional interests in working with these pupils to be ready to accommodate their needs. The book also contributes to a better understanding of the nature of SEBD, especially since the number of students presenting such difficulties in Cypriot primary education requires practitioners to be ready to provide the best practices possible.

    • Education
      July 2019

      Creating Social and Emotional Learning Environments

      by Dr. Amy Cranston, Forewords by Bryan Cranston & Michael Funk

      If there's one thing teachers can agree on, it's that social and emotional learning is a hot topic in education. But beyond this, questions still remain. Many educators find themselves wondering, what exactly is SEL? How should it be taught? What does it look like in the classroom? And, is it our job as educators to teach teach students non-academic life skills? Based on author Dr. Amy Cranston's experiences with implementing SEL from a practical standpoint, this book defines SEL and digs into the real work of how to incorporate SEL in K-12 schools. It makes the connection between research and practical application and the real-life examples and testimonials of SEL in the classroom will help educators effectively implement SEL programming. Featured case studies demonstrate real-world applications of SEL in different types of K-12 learning environments. It addresses students' different interests and varied learning styles and features Mindful Moments that encourage understanding, learning, and reflection. By supporting the emotional needs of students, educators will not only address issues such as discipline problems and absenteeism, but will help their students to be more mindful and self-aware. By encouraging spaces where intrapersonal and interpersonal skills are celebrated and cultivated, educators will set the foundation for all students to succeed.

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties

      Meeting Special Needs.

      by Collette. Drifte

    • Teaching of students with emotional & behavioural difficulties

      Meeting Special Needs.

      by Selena Ledgerton. Cooper

    • Abnormal psychology
      June 2013

      DYSLEXIA DISMANTLED

      A practical breakdown of the myths and realities of dyslexia

      by Laughton King

      Finally, an insightful, clear and practical breakdown of the realities of dyslexia, from the author’s own life experience. This exposition of the thinking, learning and living style that characterise the dyslexic individual is written equally for the educator, the parent and the struggling dyslexic himself. Eighteen myths dispelled, 61 personal characteristics outlined, and a raft of indicators examined, this book will help a large section of the population understand their own normality, their own intact and integrated thinking style, and allow them to take positive charge of their learning processes and their functioning in society. There is nothing wrong with their brain wiring, they are not deficient, they do not need medication. As a diesel motor differs from a petrol engine, the so-called ‘dyslexic’ differs from the non-dyslexic in a simple and rudimentary way. The Western world has a modern education system based around language as the prime learning tool – teaching, learning and assessment are typically language-based. The ‘dyslexic’ person is disadvantaged in this system, not only because is he a pictorial thinker, but because of a lesser capacity to use 'internal dialogue', he is unable to process the language-based education system at a competitive level.

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