• Teaching skills & techniques
      November 2015

      Learning Teaching

      Becoming an inspirational teacher

      by Pete Boyd, Barry Hymer, Karen Lockney

      An essential and aspirational text for all beginning teachers, with a clear focus on learning in order to support you becoming an outstanding teacher who makes a difference to learners, colleagues, schools and policy.

    • Educational strategies & policy
      November 2014

      Theories of Professional Learning

      A Critical Guide for Teacher Educators

      by Carey Philpott

      An essential guide to important theories of professional learning for teacher educators, of particular value to those taking on new responsibilities in relation to initial teacher education (ITE) and those interested in developing new ways of working in partnership.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences

      What Does This Look Like In The Classroom?

      Bridging The Gap Between Research And Practice

      by Carl Hendrick (Author, Editor), Robin Macpherson (Author, Editor), Oliver Caviglioli (Illustrator)

      Educators around the world are uniting behind the need for the profession to have access to more high-quality research and evidence to do their job more effectively. But every year thousands of research papers are published, some of which contradict each other. How can busy teachers know which research is worth investing time in reading and understanding? And how easily is that academic research translated into excellent practice in the classroom? In this thorough, enlightening and comprehensive book, Carl Hendrick and Robin Macpherson ask 18 of today's leading educational thinkers to distill the most up-to-date research into effective classroom practice in 10 of the most important areas of teaching. The result is a fascinating manual that will benefit every single teacher in every single school, in all four corners of the globe. Contributors: Assessment, marking & feedback: Dylan Wiliam & Daisy Christodoulou; Behaviour: Tom Bennett & Jill Berry; Classroom talk and questioning: Martin Robinson & Doug Lemov; Learning myths: David Didau & Pedro de Bruyckere; Motivation: Nick Rose & Lucy Crehan; Psychology and memory: Paul Kirschner & Yana Weinstein; SEN: Jarlath O Brien & Maggie Snowling; Technology: Jose Picardo & Neelam Parmar; Reading and literacy: Alex Quigley & Dianne Murphy

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2016

      Emergence and Innovation in Digital Learning

      Foundations and Applications

      by Edited by George Veletsianos

      Educational systems worldwide are facing an enormous shift as a result of sociocultural, political, economic, and technological changes. The technologies and practices that have developed over the last decade have been heralded as opportunities to transform both online and traditional education systems. While proponents of these new ideas often postulate that they have the potential to address the educational problems facing both students and institutions and that they could provide an opportunity to rethink the ways that education is organized and enacted, there is little evidence of emerging technologies and practices in use in online education. Because researchers and practitioners interested in these possibilities often reside in various disciplines and academic departments the sharing and dissemination of their work across often rigid boundaries is a formidable task. Contributors to Emergence and Innovation in Digital Learning include individuals who are shaping the future of online learning with their innovative applications and investigations on the impact of issues such as openness, analytics, MOOCs, and social media. Building on work first published in Emerging Technologies in Distance Education, the contributors to this collection harness the dispersed knowledge in online education to provide a one-stop locale for work on emergent approaches in the field. Their conclusions will influence the adoption and success of these approaches to education and will enable researchers and practitioners to conceptualize, critique, and enhance their understanding of the foundations and applications of new technologies. To learn more about this publisher, click here: http://bit.ly/1ZT7e56

    • Memoirs
      March 2012

      Dancing Through History

      In Search of the Stories That Define Canada

      by Lori Henry

      In Dancing Through History, Henry crosses Canada's vast physical and ethnic terrain to uncover how its various cultures have evolved through their dances. Her coast-to-coast journey takes her to Haida Gwaii in British Columbia, where she witnesses the seldom seen animist dances of the islands' First Nation people. In the Arctic, Henry partakes in Inuit drum dancing, kept alive by a new generation of Nunavut youth. And in CapeBreton, she uncovers the ancient "step dance" of the once culturally oppressed Gaels of Nova Scotia. During her travels, Henry discovers that dance helps to break down barriers and encourage cooperation between people with a history of injustice. Dance, she finds, can provide key insight into what people value most as a culture, which is often more similar than it seems. It is this kind of understanding that goes beyond our divisive histories and gives us compassion for one another. Unique to this book, Dancing Through History includes first person interviews with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (Canada's Aboriginal groups) talking about their traditions and the effect colonisation has had on them, all through the lens of dance. Their voices are given ample space to speak for themselves – what is revealed is a beautiful worldview and many lessons to be learned in order to have a healthy planet and tolerant people as we move into the future. Book Details: This is an adult non-fiction book of Canadian content. The target market is curious travellers and those interested in culture beyond the typical tourist traps. Sales have ranged from junior high schools to retired baby boomers. Interested publishers can make an offer directly on the profile page to buy available rights.

    • Biography & True Stories
      March 2015

      American Authors Unplugged

      Interviews about Books

      by Martha Cinader

      Representative of modern American Literature, the conversations with authors in this book are evenly divided between men and women who bring to life the experiences of natives, immigrants, slaves and rebels. As a whole, they address the enduring themes of freedom and the pursuit of happiness. Following is a list of the authors interviewed. For further information about the interviews please refer to the supporting document. Rudolfo Anaya - Zia Summer Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni - Sister of My Heart Russel Banks - Cloudsplitter Nora Okja Keller - Comfort Woman Dr. Leonard Shlain - The Alphabet Versus the Goddess Barbara Chase-Riboud - The President's Daughter A.A. Carr - Eye Killers Lan Cao - Monkey Bridge Hal Sirowitz - My Therapist Said Kate Horsley - Crazy Woman Dennis McFarland - A Face at the Window

    • Educational strategies & policy

      Education For 1.3 Billion

      Former Chinese Vice Premier LI LANQING On 10 Years of Education Reform and Development

      by Lanqing Li (author)

      A series of interviews with the former Chinese Vice Premier Li Lanqing A broad and comprehensive view of all aspects of education for 1.3 billion Chinese In-depth views and far-sighted observations from a policy maker, against the historical background Insights into Li Lanqing’s personal experiences and mind’s journey

    • Educational strategies & policy

      Education For 1.3 Billion

      Former Chinese Vice Premier LI LANQING On 10 Years of Education Reform and Development

      by Lanqing Li (author)

      A series of interviews with the former Chinese Vice Premier Li Lanqing A broad and comprehensive view of all aspects of education for 1.3 billion Chinese In-depth views and far-sighted observations from a policy maker, against the historical background Insights into Li Lanqing’s personal experiences and mind’s journey

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2013

      A new imperative

      Regions and higher education in difficult times

      by Chris Duke, Michael Osborne, Michael Osborne, Bruce Wilson

      At a time in history when global challenges are becoming more intractable and threatening, it makes sense to draw on the specialist expertise of our universities. Much of government interest in doing so has typically focused on the major research institutions with their records of new discovery and invention. However, there is extensive evidence that the greatest opportunities are at regional level. Despite globalisation, regions are becoming more and more important as sites of identity and policy intervention. Regions can take their futures into their own hands, and their local universities are a crucial resource of expertise to support these initiatives. However, there have been significant barriers to effective cooperation between universities and their regional authorities. This book provides an analysis of these circumstances and draws on an international research project to point academics, policy makers and practitioners in the right direction. It provides extensive evidence from this project to support its argument. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2013

      Knowledge, democracy and action

      Community-university research partnerships in global perspectives

      by Budd L. Hall, Michael Osborne, Edward T. Jackson, Rajesh Tandon, Jean-Marc Fontan, Nirmala Lall

      Knowledge, democracy and action: Community-university research partnerships in global perspectives is based on a three-year international comparative study undertaken by the Global Alliance on Community Based Research and supported by the UNESCO Chair in Community Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education. It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. The book draws on the experience and insights of thirty-seven scholars and practitioners from the Global South and North. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building in the north and the south, on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships, models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. ;

    • Educational strategies & policy
      January 2008

      Jesuit and Feminist Education

      Intersections in Teaching and Learning for the Twenty-first Century

      by Edited by Jocelyn M. Boryczka, and Elizabeth A. Petrino, Introduction by Jeffrey P. von Arx, S.J., Epilogue by Charles L. Currie, S.J.

    • Educational strategies & policy
      January 2008

      Jesuit and Feminist Education

      Intersections in Teaching and Learning for the Twenty-first Century

      by Edited by Jocelyn M. Boryczka, and Elizabeth A. Petrino, Introduction by Jeffrey P. von Arx, S.J., Epilogue by Charles L. Currie, S.J.

    • Educational psychology

      The Competency Curriculum Toolkit

      Developing PLTS Through Themed Learning

      by Jackie Beere & Helen Boyle

      This book explores the concept of a competency-based curriculum for KS3 and provides a range of resources for implementing creative learning in schools. It is widely acknowledged that students will need to be flexible, self-motivated learners if they are to thrive in our rapidly changing global community.

    • Organization & management of education

      The Literacy Toolkit

      Improving Students' Speaking, Listening, Reading and Writing Skills

      by Amanda Sara

      The Literacy Toolkit is a journey into understanding literacy in our society, its impacts upon our schools and the practical and creative strategies we can use to ensure every pupil’s literacy skills progress rapidly in all subjects. It embraces what we know about literacy learning and how we can move things forward creatively in the classroom and beyond, so that students, learners and teachers will have a positive impact upon learning. It also embraces the notion that literacy needs to be addressed by all for all students to succeed. It looks at the key issues and alternative ways to address them in a creative and fun but purposeful manner. This teacher’s resource is divided into four sections literacy in our society, the importance of it and how we put that into practice at KS3 and KS4 with the new; KS3 curriculum and the transition between KS2 and 3; 50 generic practical literacy strategies for the classroom; whole school strategies which need to be adopted for literacy to flourish; a selection of generic tools to be used for assessing literacy.

    • Children's & YA
      2011

      Brave Music of a Distant Drum

      by Manu Herbstein

      Brave Music of a Distant Drum by Manu Herbstein Published by Red Deer Press, Canada and Techmate, Ghana From the back cover: Ama is a slave. She is old and dying and has an incredible story to tell. It is about violence and heartache, but it is also a story of courage, hope, determination, and ultimately, love. Since Ama is blind, she cannot write down her story for future generations. Instead, she summons the son from whom she has been long separated. At first he thinks she's old and tiresome. But as Ama's astonishing journey unfolds in her own words, his world changes forever, until he can never see it with the same eyes again. Nor will those who read Ama's story.

    • Education
      August 2013

      Towards a Standards-Based Curriculum 2014

      A Toolkit for the New Primary Curriculum in England (Revised Edition)

      by Jazz C Williams

      Towards a Standards-Based Curriculum 2014 offers England's primary schools guidance on implementing the National Curriculum and responding to standards-based reform in Mathematics, Science and English. Two chapters, 'Assessing Without Levels' and 'Assessment Plans', address school-based assessment in monitoring the impact of teaching on learning and achievement. This revised edition features: Conquering Primary Maths, a programme for Year 1 to Year 6 including medium-term plans Standards-based English unit plans with emphasis on balancing spelling and word structure across a year Key Stage 1 and 2 Writing Assessment Records Standards-based medium-term plans for Science aligned to the QCA Scheme of Work Guided Reading Records The material contained in this book bridges between theory and practice making Towards a Standards-Based Curriculum 2014 an essential resource for schools.

    • Literacy strategies

      Literacy Work in the Reign of Human Capital

      by Evan Watkins

      In recent years, a number of books in the field of literacy research have addressed the experiences of literacy users or the multiple processes of learning literacy skills in a rapidly changing technological environment. In contrast to these studies, this book addresses the subjects of literacy. In other words, it is about how literacy workers are subjected to the relations between new forms of labor and the concept of human capital as a dominant economic structure in the United States. It is about how literacies become forms of value producing labor in everyday life both within and beyond the workplace itself. As Evan Watkins shows, apprehending the meaning of literacy work requires an understanding of how literacies have changed in relation to not only technology but also to labor, capital, and economics. The emergence of new literacies has produced considerable debate over basic definitions as well as the complexities of gain and loss. At the same time, the visibility of these debates between advocates of old versus new literacies has obscured the development of more fundamental changes. Most significantly, Watkins argues, it is no longer possible to represent human capital solely as the kind of long-term resource that Gary Becker and other neoclassical economists have defined. Like corporate inventory and business management practices, human capital—labor—now also appears in a “just-in-time” form, as if a power of action on the occasion rather than a capital asset in reserve. Just-in-time human capital valorizes the expansion of choice, but it depends absolutely on the invisible literacy work consigned to the peripheries of concentrated human capital. In an economy wherein peoples’ attention begins to eclipse information as a primary commodity, a small number of choices appear with an immensely magnified intensity while most others disappear entirely. As Literacy Work in the Reign of Human Capital deftly illustrates, the concentration of human labor in the digital age reinforces and extends a class division of winners on the inside of technological innovation and losers everywhere else.

    • Literacy strategies

      Literacy Work in the Reign of Human Capital

      by Evan Watkins

      In recent years, a number of books in the field of literacy research have addressed the experiences of literacy users or the multiple processes of learning literacy skills in a rapidly changing technological environment. In contrast to these studies, this book addresses the subjects of literacy. In other words, it is about how literacy workers are subjected to the relations between new forms of labor and the concept of human capital as a dominant economic structure in the United States. It is about how literacies become forms of value producing labor in everyday life both within and beyond the workplace itself. As Evan Watkins shows, apprehending the meaning of literacy work requires an understanding of how literacies have changed in relation to not only technology but also to labor, capital, and economics. The emergence of new literacies has produced considerable debate over basic definitions as well as the complexities of gain and loss. At the same time, the visibility of these debates between advocates of old versus new literacies has obscured the development of more fundamental changes. Most significantly, Watkins argues, it is no longer possible to represent human capital solely as the kind of long-term resource that Gary Becker and other neoclassical economists have defined. Like corporate inventory and business management practices, human capital—labor—now also appears in a “just-in-time” form, as if a power of action on the occasion rather than a capital asset in reserve. Just-in-time human capital valorizes the expansion of choice, but it depends absolutely on the invisible literacy work consigned to the peripheries of concentrated human capital. In an economy wherein peoples’ attention begins to eclipse information as a primary commodity, a small number of choices appear with an immensely magnified intensity while most others disappear entirely. As Literacy Work in the Reign of Human Capital deftly illustrates, the concentration of human labor in the digital age reinforces and extends a class division of winners on the inside of technological innovation and losers everywhere else.

    • Literacy strategies

      Literacy Work in the Reign of Human Capital

      by Evan Watkins

      In recent years, a number of books in the field of literacy research have addressed the experiences of literacy users or the multiple processes of learning literacy skills in a rapidly changing technological environment. In contrast to these studies, this book addresses the subjects of literacy. In other words, it is about how literacy workers are subjected to the relations between new forms of labor and the concept of human capital as a dominant economic structure in the United States. It is about how literacies become forms of value producing labor in everyday life both within and beyond the workplace itself. As Evan Watkins shows, apprehending the meaning of literacy work requires an understanding of how literacies have changed in relation to not only technology but also to labor, capital, and economics. The emergence of new literacies has produced considerable debate over basic definitions as well as the complexities of gain and loss. At the same time, the visibility of these debates between advocates of old versus new literacies has obscured the development of more fundamental changes. Most significantly, Watkins argues, it is no longer possible to represent human capital solely as the kind of long-term resource that Gary Becker and other neoclassical economists have defined. Like corporate inventory and business management practices, human capital—labor—now also appears in a “just-in-time” form, as if a power of action on the occasion rather than a capital asset in reserve. Just-in-time human capital valorizes the expansion of choice, but it depends absolutely on the invisible literacy work consigned to the peripheries of concentrated human capital. In an economy wherein peoples’ attention begins to eclipse information as a primary commodity, a small number of choices appear with an immensely magnified intensity while most others disappear entirely. As Literacy Work in the Reign of Human Capital deftly illustrates, the concentration of human labor in the digital age reinforces and extends a class division of winners on the inside of technological innovation and losers everywhere else.

    • Literacy strategies

      Literacy Work in the Reign of Human Capital

      by Evan Watkins

      In recent years, a number of books in the field of literacy research have addressed the experiences of literacy users or the multiple processes of learning literacy skills in a rapidly changing technological environment. In contrast to these studies, this book addresses the subjects of literacy. In other words, it is about how literacy workers are subjected to the relations between new forms of labor and the concept of human capital as a dominant economic structure in the United States. It is about how literacies become forms of value producing labor in everyday life both within and beyond the workplace itself. As Evan Watkins shows, apprehending the meaning of literacy work requires an understanding of how literacies have changed in relation to not only technology but also to labor, capital, and economics. The emergence of new literacies has produced considerable debate over basic definitions as well as the complexities of gain and loss. At the same time, the visibility of these debates between advocates of old versus new literacies has obscured the development of more fundamental changes. Most significantly, Watkins argues, it is no longer possible to represent human capital solely as the kind of long-term resource that Gary Becker and other neoclassical economists have defined. Like corporate inventory and business management practices, human capital—labor—now also appears in a “just-in-time” form, as if a power of action on the occasion rather than a capital asset in reserve. Just-in-time human capital valorizes the expansion of choice, but it depends absolutely on the invisible literacy work consigned to the peripheries of concentrated human capital. In an economy wherein peoples’ attention begins to eclipse information as a primary commodity, a small number of choices appear with an immensely magnified intensity while most others disappear entirely. As Literacy Work in the Reign of Human Capital deftly illustrates, the concentration of human labor in the digital age reinforces and extends a class division of winners on the inside of technological innovation and losers everywhere else.

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