• Child & developmental psychology

      First Steps to a Physical Basis of Concentration

      An Initial Strategy for Parents and Teachers Relating to Learning and Behaviour Problems

      by Roy Y. Anderson

      Children’s conduct and learning problems can be due to poor concentration, and this is frequently viewed as a behavioural problem. First Steps challenges this view, demonstrating how simple physical exercises for only a few minutes a day can greatly improve a child’s concentration. All ages.

    • Psychology

      Harry the Hypno-potamus

      More Metaphorical Tales for Children.

      by Linda. Thomson

      This second book of metaphors for children will entertain and delight while the therapeutic message, cleverly embedded in the story, slips into the unconscious mind of the child. The tales enhance empowerment by exposing children to new possibilities, new perspectives and differing philosophies. For the clinician, the metaphors offer a treasure trove of techniques and hypnotic language that can be adapted for a variety of situations and problems.

    • Child & developmental psychology

      Understanding Behaviour in the Early Years

      by Kay Mathieson

    • Abnormal psychology
      June 2013

      DYSLEXIA DISMANTLED

      A practical breakdown of the myths and realities of dyslexia

      by Laughton King

      Finally, an insightful, clear and practical breakdown of the realities of dyslexia, from the author’s own life experience. This exposition of the thinking, learning and living style that characterise the dyslexic individual is written equally for the educator, the parent and the struggling dyslexic himself. Eighteen myths dispelled, 61 personal characteristics outlined, and a raft of indicators examined, this book will help a large section of the population understand their own normality, their own intact and integrated thinking style, and allow them to take positive charge of their learning processes and their functioning in society. There is nothing wrong with their brain wiring, they are not deficient, they do not need medication. As a diesel motor differs from a petrol engine, the so-called ‘dyslexic’ differs from the non-dyslexic in a simple and rudimentary way. The Western world has a modern education system based around language as the prime learning tool – teaching, learning and assessment are typically language-based. The ‘dyslexic’ person is disadvantaged in this system, not only because is he a pictorial thinker, but because of a lesser capacity to use 'internal dialogue', he is unable to process the language-based education system at a competitive level.

    • Adventure
      April 2015

      The Game Master

      by Ian D Copsey

      What is it like to be someone else – especially your most hated enemy? Why do they think and do things differently? Tired of arguing over which of them was the best gamer, Josh and Alex stumbled upon a new video game shop, run by an enigmatic and amiable Japanese shopkeeper. He was to be their Game Master in this virtual reality video game that had no game controls. Little did they know it was a game that would change their lives, of their friends… and enemies… forever. “Oh! This game is no ordinary game,” The Game Master explained, “It reads your thoughts, seeks out your weaknesses to give challenges that are right just for you, the challenges you need to help you grow.” "It can read our minds?" puzzled the boys. As they progressed through the game’s levels they found out more about themselves and the lives of everyone around them. Mysteriously, the Game of Life began to spread its influence beyond Josh and Alex’s lives and to their friends. From Josh and Alex switching roles with each other in the game, campfire frolics and ghostly stories from their teachers, the boys learned more about their friends around them. The Game Master’s zany antics as he hosted a T.V. game show, “Hiro’s Happy Heroes” in the Game of Life, released a string of rib tickling gags, teases and tantalising tattles. The climax of the Game of Life came from the school Rube Goldberg challenge in which each grade had to join as a team to build their own whacky, madcap contraption. Would Josh and Alex be able to manage to get the two bullies in the class to work within the team? Patiently, with impish humour, the Game Master guides them through the different levels to a final intriguing twist.

    • Child & developmental psychology
      April 2015

      Latency – the „golden age“ of childhood

      Psychoanalytical development theory according to Freud, Klein and Bion

      by Gertraud Diem-Wille

      Gertraud Diem-Wille illustrates the psychoanalytical development theories of Freud, Klein and Bion in regards to the ages between 6 and 11 years. The “golden age of childhood” with its desire for development and a willingness to learn describes a normal development. However, it may also show disruptions, which had so far not been recognisable, and which present themselves as learning difficulties, behavioural problems, fits of anger or tendencies to withdraw or use violence. Extensive case studies from child analyses show how inner conflicts may be identified and integrated with the help if interpretations.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 1999

      Übergang zur Elternschaft

      Aktuelle Studien zur Bewältigung eines unterschätzten Lebensereignisses

      by Barbara Reichle, Harald Werneck

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      October 2018

      Die an die Schüler/-innen gerichtete Sprache (SgS)

      Studien zur Veränderung der Lehrer/-innensprache von der Grundschule bis zur Oberstufe

      by Katrin Kleinschmidt-Schinke

      Verändern Lehrpersonen ihre an die Schüler/-innen gerichtete Sprache (SgS) von der Grundschule bis zur Oberstufe?Diese Frage steht im Zentrum der vorliegenden Studie zum adaptiven sprachlichen Handeln von Lehrer/-innen. Es wird unter Rückgriff auf die input- und interaktionsfokussierte Spracherwerbsforschung untersucht, inwieweit die teilnehmenden Deutsch- und Biologielehrpersonen ihre Sprache von der Grundschule über die Unter- und Mittelstufe bis zur Oberstufe immer mehr in Richtung konzeptioneller Schriftlichkeit verändern. Ferner wird analysiert, inwiefern sie mikro- und makrointeraktionale Stützmechanismen nutzen, die den Erwerb der Unterrichtssprache fördern. Untersuchungsbasis bildet ein videodokumentiertes Korpus von Unterrichtsstunden aus dritten Grundschulklassen sowie aus drei Jahrgangsstufen des Gymnasiums. Für die Analysen wird konzeptionelle Schriftlichkeit in vier Operationalisierungsdimensionen überführt.Die Studie zeigt für den Unterrichtsdiskurs einen hochgradig verdichteten Kontext zum Erwerb bildungssprachlicher Struktur- und Ausdrucksformen auf, der adaptiv an die sprachlichen Fähigkeiten der Schüler/-innen angepasst ist.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 1991

      Schule und Persönlichkeitsentwicklung

      Ein Resümee der Längsschnittforschung

      by Reinhard Pekrun, Helmut Fend

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2017

      Barriers to Play and Recreation for Children and Young People with Disabilities

      Exploring Environmental Factors

      by Carol Barron, Angharad Beckett, Marieke Coussens, Annemie Desoete, Nan Cannon Jones, Helen Lynch, Maria Prellwitz, Deborah Fenney Salkeld

      This report reviews international research into the barriers to play for children with disabilities. The authors come from different disciplinary backgrounds, in Sociology, Social Policy, Anthropology, Occupational Health and Education and bring different concerns to this review. They are united, however, in their adoption of a rights-based perspective. The UNCRC and UNCRPD emphasise the right to play for children with disabilities. Play is vital for child development. The problem of 'play deprivation' for many children with disabilities is very real. Yet the right to, and value of 'play for the sake of play', for fun and recreation, must not be forgotten in relation to the lives of children with disabilities. The focus in this report is upon barriers to play that exist beyond the minds and bodies of individual children, within a 'disabling' environment. Barriers include those associated with the design of the built environment, social attitudes and professional practices. The report maps an agenda for further research in this area, emphasising the need for participatory methodologies that capture the views and voices of children with disabilities, their friends and families, on this important issue of play.

    • Education
      October 2017

      The Influence of Teacher-Student Relationships and Feedback on Students' Engagement with Learning

      by Author(s): Roger Wood

      This book presents a potential hierarchy between the three basic psychological needs central to Self-Determination Theory (SDT). Findings from the author’s research suggest that the motivation to exercise autonomy is an outcome that is cumulatively influenced by the perceived quality of the teacher-student relationship and students’ perceived competence within specific learning contexts and with a specific teacher.These findings are the basis for three hypotheses regarding students’ motivation to engage with learning activities. The first is that perceived competence is informed by and reciprocally informs the quality of the teacher-student relationship. The second is that students’ perceived competence and the quality of the teacher-student relationship have a combined impact upon students’ autonomous motivation. The final posit is that a teacher can be autonomy supportive both prior to and during activities where students have opportunities to exercise their autonomy. Such autonomy support includes the influence of teacher feedback upon students’ perceived competence and their subsequent motivation to autonomously engage with learning activities.This research begins to unravel such motivational interplay through an SDT-informed model, which is used as the basis for discussing the specific influence of teacher feedback and autonomy support upon students’ engagement with learning activities in formal learning settings. The findings and model are worthy of further testing and development, as part of the wider agenda of student engagement, wellbeing and positive psychology prevalent in educational research, education psychology, and the philosophy of social motivation.

    • Fantasy
      July 2012

      Dancing the Tao

      Le Guin and Moral Development

      by Author(s): Sandra J. Lindow

      Dancing the Tao: Le Guin and Moral Development takes an original approach to Ursula K. Le Guin’s work – speculative fiction, poetry and children’s literature – by considering her Taoist upbringing and then looking through the lens of moral development theorists such as Carol Gilligan and Mary Field Belenky, and psychologists such as Lenore Terr and Jennifer J. Freyd. It is the most comprehensive approach to Le Guin’s moral thinking to date. A particular emphasis is put on Le Guin’s depiction of physical and sexual child abuse and its long term aftereffects such as post traumatic stress disorder. The focus throughout the book is on how morality develops through self-awareness and voice, how moral decisions are made and how Le Guin challenges readers to reconsider their own moral thinking.This book covers all of Le Guin’s major works such as The Left Hand of Darkness, The Dispossessed, the Earthsea Series, Always Coming Home, The Telling and Lavinia, and it also looks in depth at work that is rarely discussed such as Le Guin’s early work, her poetry, and her picture books.

    • Child & developmental psychology
      July 2009

      Trauma and Attachment in the Kindertransport Context

      German-Jewish Child Refugees’ Accounts of Displacement and Acculturation in Britain

      by Author(s): Iris Guske

      The present volume is the result of an interdisciplinary oral history research project, which was carried out at the Centre for German-Jewish Studies at the University of Sussex. It focuses on the Kindertransport, the British rescue operation saving 10,000 predominantly German-Jewish children from Nazi Germany, and is based on in-depth case studies of five child survivors of the Holocaust.Looking at human development over the life cycle as mediated by intervening trauma was at the heart of the project, which examined the making and breaking of a child's close ties to significant others, processes of identity formation under acculturative stress as well as the creation and recall of traumatic memories. The study is thus one of the few in the field of attachment research which sheds light on the lifelong influence which early attachment has on coping with massive cumulative trauma. The former child refugees' narratives are enriched by letters, diaries, or articles written by them and their (host) families as well as by interviews conducted with family members and friends. Consequently, we can look at individual lives and collective destinies from more than one perspective as we are provided with rich, multi-layered accounts of people's whole-life trajectories.While each Holocaust survivor's developmental story is unique, it is, however, linked to the others' by the common experience of negotiating an identity between two countries, cultures, and religions against the background of unparalleled political upheavals, and as such also sheds light on, and offers ways out of, the traumata suffered in present-day contexts of enforced migration and displacement.

    • Child & developmental psychology
      April 2017

      Ageism in Youth Studies

      Generation Maligned

      by Author(s): Gayle Kimball

      Ageism is prevalent in a great deal of current scholarship in the social sciences as scholars fault youth for being delinquent or politically apathetic. Researchers ignore young people’s actual voices, despite their leadership in recent global uprisings, some of which unseated entrenched dictators. Neoliberalism must be exposed in its focus on youth sub-cultures and styles rather than economic barriers caused by growing inequality and rising youth unemployment rates. Ageism in Youth Studies also discusses the debate about “Generation We or Me” and if Millennials are narcissistic. Resources about global youth studies are included, along with the results of the author’s surveys and interviews with over 4,000 young people from 88 countries.

    • Child & developmental psychology
      April 2017

      Ageism in Youth Studies

      Generation Maligned

      by Author(s): Gayle Kimball

      Ageism is prevalent in a great deal of current scholarship in the social sciences as scholars fault youth for being delinquent or politically apathetic. Researchers ignore young people’s actual voices, despite their leadership in recent global uprisings, some of which unseated entrenched dictators. Neoliberalism must be exposed in its focus on youth sub-cultures and styles rather than economic barriers caused by growing inequality and rising youth unemployment rates. Ageism in Youth Studies also discusses the debate about “Generation We or Me” and if Millennials are narcissistic. Resources about global youth studies are included, along with the results of the author’s surveys and interviews with over 4,000 young people from 88 countries.

    • Child & developmental psychology
      September 2012

      The Committed Workforce

      Evidence from the Field

      by Author(s): Yannis Markovits

      Organizational commitment and job satisfaction are two interrelated work attitudes, and the kind of relationship which is influenced by the economic sector and the type of employment. Employees develop commitment profiles that relate differently to job satisfaction and its facets. Furthermore, individuals experience two different regulatory foci that relate to the forms of organizational commitment, and these foci develop into separable characters that moderate the commitment/satisfaction relationship. Since commitment predicts organizational citizenship behaviours, and satisfaction relates to these behaviours, then job satisfaction mediates the relationship between organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviours (OCBs). Study 1 investigates the research hypotheses based on the moderating role of the economic sector in relation to job satisfaction/organizational commitment relationships, especially in regard to the forms of commitment and the facets of satisfaction – extrinsic satisfaction and intrinsic satisfaction. Overall, 618 employees successfully completed the questionnaires (258 from private sector companies and 360 from the public administration). Then, distinguishable organizational commitment profiles were developed and constructed from the forms or constructs of commitment. Two different samples are used in Study 2 in order to test the relevant hypotheses – 1,119 employees from the private sector and 476 from the public sector. Study 3 uses the concept of regulatory focus, where the two foci relate differently to forms of organizational commitment, and these two states moderate the satisfaction/commitment relationship; furthermore, individuals develop four separable regulatory focus characters based on the two major regulatory foci. Moreover, the moderating intervention is crucially influenced by the employment status of the individuals. The research hypotheses developed in this part are tested through two samples of employees: 258 working in the private sector and 263 in the public sector. Study 4 examines the mediating role of job satisfaction on the organizational commitment/organizational citizenship behaviours relationship. It argues that job satisfaction mediates the relationship between the forms of commitment and OCBs, and furthermore, job satisfaction more strongly mediates the relationship between these forms and loyal boosterism (one of the OCB dimensions). The relevant hypotheses were tested through a combined sample of 646 employees, equally drawn from the two sectors. The results are discussed, implications and contributions analyzed, and limitations and recommendations for future research presented.

    • Media studies
      December 2012

      Seductive Screens

      Children's Media—Past, Present, and Future

      by Author(s): Michael Brody, M.D.

      Seductive Screens: Children’s Media—Past, Present, and Future describes the development of child media from its early beginnings on radio to the millions of postings on Facebook. The book explains the collision of economics, psychology, the needs of parents, and technology in creating the perfect storm for kid’s media growth. Many related issues are discussed as they affect children’s media including education, civility, celebrity, violence, play, and child rearing. There is a special emphasis on the influence of Disney, Sesame Street and Batman. Using case studies, and his own ambivalence expressed by personal anecdotes, the author places this important subject in a psychological context. The reader is encouraged to add their input to the discussion, as questions follow most chapters.

    • Child & developmental psychology
      June 2015

      Building Stronger Communities with Children and Families

      by Editor(s): Karl Brettig

      This book captures the essence of how communities that better support healthy child development can be built. It includes a look at key elements of the Australian Communities for Children initiative, using a collaborative approach that takes into account community, government and family. How can the voices of children be heard in decision-making processes that impact their futures? How can the avalanche of electronic games, the information superhighway, and social media be negotiated to support, educate and protect children living in an online world? What does it mean to use a whole of community approach to supporting families? How can government departments and non-government agencies work together with communities to provide the kind of support that effectively engages families, so that the quality of parenting improves and results in healthy child development? What strategies can be developed in early childhood and school settings to improve family functioning? How can the integration of fragmented services be improved? While these are undoubtedly diverse questions, this kind of holistic viewpoint is necessary if we are to redesign inadequate, siloed approaches and build family friendly urban villages that deliver improved outcomes for children.Complex early childhood trauma often leads to recurring problems for generations with significant economic cost if there is no effective intervention. The current ‘merry go round’ of services risks the re-traumatisation and escalation of symptoms of those seeking help. If significant change is to be witnessed, relevant stakeholders need to make a concerted attempt to, first of all, listen to what children and families are saying, and then to implement the kinds of practices and policies that will adequately address their needs and aspirations. To do this, a well-trained workforce that understands the issues of holistic, trans-disciplinary and integrated work with children and families is required. Governments and services can’t do this alone. Most families are more influenced by peers and associates, and change needs to be galvanised across whole communities. A whole of community approach involves linking together a place-based combination of government, non-government and community initiatives to support families. Services need to consider how they can work with individuals and community groups to develop the kind of social environment that enables families to flourish. This is not an easy task, and, drawing on research and practical experience, this book looks at some of the key ingredients needed by those individuals and organisations who dare to attempt it.

    • Media studies
      December 2012

      Seductive Screens

      Children's Media—Past, Present, and Future

      by Author(s): Michael Brody, M.D.

      Seductive Screens: Children’s Media—Past, Present, and Future describes the development of child media from its early beginnings on radio to the millions of postings on Facebook today. The book explains the collision of economics, psychology, the needs of parents, and technology in creating the perfect storm for kid’s media growth. Many related issues are discussed with regards to their effect on children’s media, including education, civility, celebrity, violence, play, and child rearing. There is a special emphasis on the influence of Disney, Sesame Street and Batman. Using case studies, and his own ambivalence expressed by personal anecdotes, the author places this important subject in a psychological context. The reader is encouraged to add their input to the discussion, as questions follow most chapters.

    • Child & developmental psychology
      May 2014

      Contemporary Perspectives and Research on Early Childhood Education

      by Editor(s): Mustafa Yasar, Ozkan Ozgun, Jeanne Galbraith

      Contemporary Perspectives and Research on Early Childhood Education is a welcome addition to the field of early childhood education. This book enhances the understanding of different approaches to curriculum and instruction; appropriate assessment strategies; the role of math and science in children’s development; the importance of seeing the whole child and ensuring children develop holistically through play and arts; training effective teachers; and the importance of helping parents to be better supporters of their children. Along with this comprehensive content, the book also contains diverse methodologies including qualitative, quantitative and mixed-method approaches, which will further enrich the reader’s perspective and understanding of a wide range of topics in the field. Thus, this book creates a platform for researchers and practitioners to share and discuss research findings, expertise, and experiences about early childhood education.

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