• Philosophy
      September 2008

      The Singularity of Being

      Lacan and the Immortal Within

      by Mari Ruti

    • Philosophy
      September 2008

      The Singularity of Being

      Lacan and the Immortal Within

      by Mari Ruti

    • Philosophy
      May 2003

      Interstices of the Sublime

      Theology and Psychoanalytic Theory

      by Clayton Crockett

    • Psychoanalytical theory (Freudian psychology)
      September 2006

      Freud and Fundamentalism

      The Psychical Politics of Knowledge

      by Edited by Stathis Gourgouris

    • Judaism
      August 2005

      Racial Fever

      Freud and the Jewish Question

      by Eliza Slavet

    • Business & management

      The Tangled World

      Understanding Human Connections, Networks and Complexity

      by Terry Lloyd

      Every form of life in the world is connected: individuals, groups, businesses, governments. There is no such thing as total isolation. Many of these connections are plain to see, and it is a commonplace to say we live in a global village. Crucially, though, the various links and relationships have been difficult for classical analysis to understand and predict.As networks and connectivity are central to the human experience, there has been a long history of trying to understand these linkages and to predict their influences and impacts; but the traditional approaches have yielded unsatisfactory explanations.Many attempts at analysis have centred round ideas of describing the world in terms of free independent agents. But it is agents' 'linkages', both strong and weak, that underpin much of human activity. Whether it is stock market moves, sudden adoption of new technologies, or the unexpected consequences of long chains of events, the inter-connectivity of life appears to defy simple explanation.In this revealing work the authors draw on multiple sources to uncover the answers to the big questions about group behaviour, connections and the complex relationships that drive our world. In particular:- What happens when agents interact?- Is it possible to make sense of all these connections?- Why are some connections more important than others?- In a world of hugely complex and intricate links, what are 'super spreaders', and why are they critical?- Can we measure and model 'emergence'?- What are the new approaches and thinking we need to embrace and understand the world around us?

    • Psychoanalytical theory (Freudian psychology)
      December 2003

      On Freud's Jewish Body

      Mitigating Circumcisions

      by Jay Geller

    • Mind, Body, Spirit

      The New Psychology

      by Charles F. Haanel

      The supreme charm of The New Psychology is the practical character of its teachings — the clarity and simplicity of its expression. Unlike many works that attempt to present psychical truths, it is not a tangled skein of disconnected thoughts, but an orderly, logical, and well-reasoned system. The New Psychology — with a synthesis of philosophy, science, metaphysics, and religion — defines man’s place in the universe and reveals his latent powers with a vividness that reminds the reader of a lightening flash. The seeker for truth will find in its pages the keys to the treasure house of the world’s wisdom. The New Psychology is quite different from Haanel’s other works. In The New Psychology, Haanel expands on the ideas and theories behind mental science and offers to you many examples and proofs that bolster the claims made. While this work is almost one hundred years old, everything holds true to this day. The New Psychology is a must for anyone who wants to understand the mental science. It is also a must for anyone who wants to thoroughly understand Haanel and his beliefs. Through his words, we can get a clearer picture of him — as a thinker, explorer, and a visionary.

    • Psychoanalytical theory (Freudian psychology)

      Confidentiality and Its Discontents

      Dilemmas of Privacy in Psychotherapy

      by Paul W. Mosher, and Jeffrey Berman

      Freud promised his patients absolute confidentiality, regardless of what they revealed, but privacy in psychotherapy began to erode a half-century ago. Psychotherapists now seem to serve as “double agents” with a dual and often conflicting allegiance to patient and society. Some therapists even go so far as to issue Miranda-type warnings, advising patients that what they say in therapy may be used against them. Confidentiality and Its Discontents explores the human stories arising from this loss of confidentiality in psychotherapy. Addressing different types of psychotherapy breaches, Mosher and Berman begin with the the story of novelist Philip Roth, who was horrified when he learned that his psychoanalyst had written a thinly veiled case study about him. Other breaches of privacy occur when the so-called duty to protect compels a therapist to break confidentiality by contacting the police. Every psychotherapist has heard about “Tarasoff,” but few know the details of this story of fatal attraction. Nor are most readers familiar with the Jaffee case, which established psychotherapist-patient privilege in the federal courts. Similiarly, the story of Robert Bierenbaum, a New York surgeon who was brought to justice fifteen years after he brutally murdered his wife, reveals how privileged communication became established in a state court. Meanwhile, the story of New York Chief Judge Sol Wachtler, convicted of harassing a former lover and her daughter, shows how the fear of the loss of confidentiality may prevent a person from seeking treatment, with potentially disastrous results. While affirming the importance of the psychotherapist-patient privilege, Confidentiality and Its Discontents focuses on both the inner and outer stories of the characters involved in noteworthy psychotherapy breaches and the ways in which psychiatry and the law can complement but sometimes clash with each other.

    • Psychoanalytical theory (Freudian psychology)

      Confidentiality and Its Discontents

      Dilemmas of Privacy in Psychotherapy

      by Paul W. Mosher, and Jeffrey Berman

      Freud promised his patients absolute confidentiality, regardless of what they revealed, but privacy in psychotherapy began to erode a half-century ago. Psychotherapists now seem to serve as “double agents” with a dual and often conflicting allegiance to patient and society. Some therapists even go so far as to issue Miranda-type warnings, advising patients that what they say in therapy may be used against them. Confidentiality and Its Discontents explores the human stories arising from this loss of confidentiality in psychotherapy. Addressing different types of psychotherapy breaches, Mosher and Berman begin with the the story of novelist Philip Roth, who was horrified when he learned that his psychoanalyst had written a thinly veiled case study about him. Other breaches of privacy occur when the so-called duty to protect compels a therapist to break confidentiality by contacting the police. Every psychotherapist has heard about “Tarasoff,” but few know the details of this story of fatal attraction. Nor are most readers familiar with the Jaffee case, which established psychotherapist-patient privilege in the federal courts. Similiarly, the story of Robert Bierenbaum, a New York surgeon who was brought to justice fifteen years after he brutally murdered his wife, reveals how privileged communication became established in a state court. Meanwhile, the story of New York Chief Judge Sol Wachtler, convicted of harassing a former lover and her daughter, shows how the fear of the loss of confidentiality may prevent a person from seeking treatment, with potentially disastrous results. While affirming the importance of the psychotherapist-patient privilege, Confidentiality and Its Discontents focuses on both the inner and outer stories of the characters involved in noteworthy psychotherapy breaches and the ways in which psychiatry and the law can complement but sometimes clash with each other.

    • Psychoanalytical theory (Freudian psychology)

      Confidentiality and Its Discontents

      Dilemmas of Privacy in Psychotherapy

      by Paul W. Mosher, and Jeffrey Berman

      Freud promised his patients absolute confidentiality, regardless of what they revealed, but privacy in psychotherapy began to erode a half-century ago. Psychotherapists now seem to serve as “double agents” with a dual and often conflicting allegiance to patient and society. Some therapists even go so far as to issue Miranda-type warnings, advising patients that what they say in therapy may be used against them. Confidentiality and Its Discontents explores the human stories arising from this loss of confidentiality in psychotherapy. Addressing different types of psychotherapy breaches, Mosher and Berman begin with the the story of novelist Philip Roth, who was horrified when he learned that his psychoanalyst had written a thinly veiled case study about him. Other breaches of privacy occur when the so-called duty to protect compels a therapist to break confidentiality by contacting the police. Every psychotherapist has heard about “Tarasoff,” but few know the details of this story of fatal attraction. Nor are most readers familiar with the Jaffee case, which established psychotherapist-patient privilege in the federal courts. Similiarly, the story of Robert Bierenbaum, a New York surgeon who was brought to justice fifteen years after he brutally murdered his wife, reveals how privileged communication became established in a state court. Meanwhile, the story of New York Chief Judge Sol Wachtler, convicted of harassing a former lover and her daughter, shows how the fear of the loss of confidentiality may prevent a person from seeking treatment, with potentially disastrous results. While affirming the importance of the psychotherapist-patient privilege, Confidentiality and Its Discontents focuses on both the inner and outer stories of the characters involved in noteworthy psychotherapy breaches and the ways in which psychiatry and the law can complement but sometimes clash with each other.

    • Psychoanalytical theory (Freudian psychology)

      Confidentiality and Its Discontents

      Dilemmas of Privacy in Psychotherapy

      by Paul W. Mosher, and Jeffrey Berman

      Freud promised his patients absolute confidentiality, regardless of what they revealed, but privacy in psychotherapy began to erode a half-century ago. Psychotherapists now seem to serve as “double agents” with a dual and often conflicting allegiance to patient and society. Some therapists even go so far as to issue Miranda-type warnings, advising patients that what they say in therapy may be used against them. Confidentiality and Its Discontents explores the human stories arising from this loss of confidentiality in psychotherapy. Addressing different types of psychotherapy breaches, Mosher and Berman begin with the the story of novelist Philip Roth, who was horrified when he learned that his psychoanalyst had written a thinly veiled case study about him. Other breaches of privacy occur when the so-called duty to protect compels a therapist to break confidentiality by contacting the police. Every psychotherapist has heard about “Tarasoff,” but few know the details of this story of fatal attraction. Nor are most readers familiar with the Jaffee case, which established psychotherapist-patient privilege in the federal courts. Similiarly, the story of Robert Bierenbaum, a New York surgeon who was brought to justice fifteen years after he brutally murdered his wife, reveals how privileged communication became established in a state court. Meanwhile, the story of New York Chief Judge Sol Wachtler, convicted of harassing a former lover and her daughter, shows how the fear of the loss of confidentiality may prevent a person from seeking treatment, with potentially disastrous results. While affirming the importance of the psychotherapist-patient privilege, Confidentiality and Its Discontents focuses on both the inner and outer stories of the characters involved in noteworthy psychotherapy breaches and the ways in which psychiatry and the law can complement but sometimes clash with each other.

    • Adventure
      April 2015

      The Game Master

      by Ian D Copsey

      What is it like to be someone else – especially your most hated enemy? Why do they think and do things differently? Tired of arguing over which of them was the best gamer, Josh and Alex stumbled upon a new video game shop, run by an enigmatic and amiable Japanese shopkeeper. He was to be their Game Master in this virtual reality video game that had no game controls. Little did they know it was a game that would change their lives, of their friends… and enemies… forever. “Oh! This game is no ordinary game,” The Game Master explained, “It reads your thoughts, seeks out your weaknesses to give challenges that are right just for you, the challenges you need to help you grow.” "It can read our minds?" puzzled the boys. As they progressed through the game’s levels they found out more about themselves and the lives of everyone around them. Mysteriously, the Game of Life began to spread its influence beyond Josh and Alex’s lives and to their friends. From Josh and Alex switching roles with each other in the game, campfire frolics and ghostly stories from their teachers, the boys learned more about their friends around them. The Game Master’s zany antics as he hosted a T.V. game show, “Hiro’s Happy Heroes” in the Game of Life, released a string of rib tickling gags, teases and tantalising tattles. The climax of the Game of Life came from the school Rube Goldberg challenge in which each grade had to join as a team to build their own whacky, madcap contraption. Would Josh and Alex be able to manage to get the two bullies in the class to work within the team? Patiently, with impish humour, the Game Master guides them through the different levels to a final intriguing twist.

    • Philosophy of mind
      March 2014

      The Pauli-Jung Conjecture

      And its impact today

      by Atmanspacher, Harald, B01; Fuchs, Christopher A., B01

      Related to the key areas of Pauli's and Jung's joint interests, the book covers overlapping issues from the perspectives of physics, philosophy, and psychology. Of primary significance are epistemological questions connected to issues such as realism...

    • Analytical & Jungian psychology
      January 2013

      Understanding yourself with C.G. Jung

      Eight cognition tasks on our path to indivuation

      by Dieter Schnocks

      Analytical psychology, according to C.G. Jung, offers in individuation a sound and contemporary approach to dealing with what constitutes the realisation of a person‘s own personality on his individual path through life. The book introduces the basics of analytical psychology and gives readers a check-list with eight cognition tasks, which enable them to explore the dimensions of their own individuation and meaningfully execute key stimuli. The author presents C. G. Jung‘s world of ideas in an outstanding professional manner, at the same time clearly calling upon many examples from everyday life.

    • Humanistic psychology
      January 2014

      Breaking and Mending

      A Hassidic Model for Clinical Psychology

      by Dr. Baruch Kahana

      The book 'Breaking and Mending', written by Baruch Kahana, a clinical psychologist and a researcher of Jewish Kabala and Hassidism, is truly a revolution in the fields of human psychology, even though it is appears to treat classic old texts and contents. The essence of this book is an inspiring meeting between the western psychology, as developed in the 20th century following the theories of Sigmund Freud and his tutors, and the Hassidic spiritual anthropology, a heritage of the great Hassidic Masters – the Ba'al-Shem-Tov, the Maggid of Mezritch, Rabbi Shneor-Zalman of Liadi, Rabbi Nachman of Breslev, and others. In his book, Dr. Kahana surveys and peruses through the developments of modern psychology, and describes the theoretic and clinical crisis that the psychology is going through during the postmodern age. Following that analysis, he suggests the Hassidic psychology as a psycho-therapeutic model, which views the human soul from an utterly inverse angle from that which is customary in the western psychology. Hence, Kahana asserts, the Hassidic psychology can focus on different dimensions of the soul and use a whole different set of treatment tools. The Hassidic psychology is displayed in varied details, through a comprehensive investigation of many Hassidic texts that results in a description of a sophisticated, organized mental and spiritual model. Nonetheless, these old-new psychological tools are not supposed to denounce the achievements of the modern western psychology, but rather to become integrated with them, to enrich them and to complete them, as demonstrated in the book. Dr. Kahana does not only transmit to the reader a general image of the subject; he gives the reader a meticulous description of the ways in which the Hassidic psychology can and should contribute to the more accepted and familiar western treatment. He goes over a series of psychological distresses, complexes and disturbances, as they are described in the DSM and the ICD, and shows how the Hassidic psychology would deal with them differently. A series of stories from Dr. Kahana's clinic brings the book to its end. Through those stories, that are well told and in detail, he demonstrates how Hassidic Psychology actually works. While doing so, Dr. Kahana gives the reader an amazingly organized model of the Hassidic anthropology and psychology in which he arranges the varied sources into one firm theory. Dr. Baruch Kahana is a clinical psychologist and a clinical psychology counselor. He teaches in the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, the Ya'akov Herzog College and in the Rothenberg Center for Jewish Psychology

    • Philosophy
      January 2013

      Introduction to the Psychology of Self Contraction (Tsimtsum)

      by Prof. Mordechai Rotenberg

      Similar to many innovative “life projects”, the discovery of the “tsimtsum” (contraction) psychology emanated from an incidental chain of events. During the sixties, when Prof. Rotenberg was a doctoral student at the University of California in Berkeley, he became immersed in the famous anti Vietnam movement which disseminated from this campus. The anti establishment aura, which imbued this social revolution also seemed to have nourished the anti psychiatric fad which claimed that labeling people as cureless schizophrenics is primarily a stigmatic act of discrimination. Following Max Weber’s sociology of religion Rotenberg then developed a counter thesis arguing that it is the Protestant- Calvinistic theology of deterministic predestination and not an elitist ideology which underlies Western irreversible diagnostic systems in psychiatry. Since the discovery that a hidden theology underlies Western psychology raised considerable controversial disputes among western psychotherapists, Rotenberg felt pressed to uncover the psychology embedded in Jewish theology. As a result, he delved during the subsequent 35 years into Jewish hermeneutic literature in order to develop the Jewish Midrashic and mystic psychological system which he constructed according to the Kabbalistic-Hasidic notion of “tsimtsum”. In the ten books which Rotenberg wrote he subsequently tried to demonstrate how the Kabbalistic theodicy that maintains that God’s voluntary contraction into himself in order to make space for the world of “others”, may serve as an alternative dialogical psychology which differs radically from the prevailing Western Darwinistic psychology of egocentrism.

    • Philosophy
      January 2015

      Saving Monotheism

      Why the most cruel despotic wars burst out in monotheistic societies

      by Prof. Mordechai Rotenberg

      In his new book Saving Monotheism, Prof. Rotenberg claims that the answer to the existential question` why the most cruel despotic wars burst out in monotheistic societies, may be found in the fatal distortion of this divine idea which was supposed to unite the believers in one god. Accordingly. Rotenberg divides the world into masculine “raping missionaries” who impose on others their definition of socio-religious norms because They” know what god wants”. However, according to the alternative feminine “conversive” definition of monotheism, people have to seek the invisible god via romantic creative inter human interactions. The feminine romantic model is derived from the biblical story of Ruth the Moabite mother of David’s Kingdom which may be used as a metaphorical pattern for nonviolent social relations. Hence the Ruthian feminine romantic model may disseminate such egalitarian ideas as “my god is your god” and “my people are your people”, because only “women who do not rape” may enhance friendly social relations. For applicable possibilities Rotenberg proposes the “couching” system according to which a potential virtuous in music, sports or a new religion, joins free willingly a romantic training program which is grounded on a dialogic contract between the coach and his novice. The outlined romantic model includes also a new expanded framework for intimacy by rereading the story of the maiden Avishag and the aging King David as an anti phallocentric system for erotic relations. Prof. Mordechai Rotenberg books in English: Author's books in English: Damnation and Deviance: the Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Failure, New York: The Free Press, Macmillan 1978. Also published in Japanese, Tokyo: Heibon Sha 1986. New English Edition: New Brunswick, Transaction, 2003. Dialogue with Deviance: The Hasidic Ethic and the Theory of Social Contraction Philadelphia: ISHI Publications 1983. Second edition, University Press of America, 1993. Also published in Portuguese, Brazil, Imago Press, 1999. Hasidic Psychology: Making Space for Others, New Brunswick: Transaction, 2003. Re-Biographing and Deviance: Psychotherapeutic Narrativism and the Midrash New York: Praeger Publishers, 1987. Dia-Logo Therapy: Psychonarration and “PaRDeS” New York: Praeger Publishers, 1991. The “Yetzer”: A Kabbalistic Psychology of Eroticism and Human Sexuality, Northvale: Jason Aronson Inc., 1997. The Trance of Terror: Psycho-religious Funda-MENTALISM, Jerusalem: Rubin Mass Pub. 2006.

    • Analytical & Jungian psychology
      July 2016

      The Therapeutic Relationship

      Concept and Practice in the Analytical Psychology of C.G. Jung

      by Claus Braun

      In the Analytical Psychotherapy of C. G. Jung, the development and design of the therapeutic relationship is of greatest importance: The resulting connection is as crucial to outcome and success. In addition to the psychoanalytic work with and within the transfer relationship to the patient, the countertransference of the analyst and the inter-subjective real relationship of psychotherapeutic pair are observed in particular. The book concerns the central concepts of Analytical Psychology and especially the Jungian technique of amplification on the conscious and unconscious relationship aspects during the course of treatment and gives a detailed insight into the dynamics of relations of analytical psychotherapy.

    • Analytical & Jungian psychology
      March 2016

      The Archetype Concept of C.G. Jung

      Theory, Research and Application

      by Christian Roesler

      The concept of archetypes and the collective unconscious represents the core of the analytical psychology of C. G. Jung. The book summarises an overview of the classical theory of archetypes and the archetypal stations of individuation process with Jung and his students as well as the theoretical development on the basis of research and findings from anthropology, human genetics and the neurosciences for the first time. This shows clearly that Jung's views must be comprehensively revised. The applications of the concept are illustrated by detailed case studies and dream series.

    Subscribe to our newsletter