• Medicine
      September 2014

      The Dark Side, Real Life Accounts of an NHS Paramedic

      The Good, the Bad and the Downright Ugly

      by Andy Thompson

      Andy Thompson’s true-to-life, graphic and gripping account of his work as an NHS paramedic in Britain’s A&E emergency Ambulance Service will shock you, sadden you, entertain you, and perhaps inspire you. You’ll smile at some of Andy’s real patient encounters, while others will cause you to wipe a tear. Using official NHS documentation recorded at the time to give precise details of each incident, Andy has held firm to the real-life accounts, even in keeping the dialogue as close as his memory allows to what was really said at the time. It’s as if you’re there next to him, struggling with the effects of adrenaline and fighting to save life. This is a rare work of medical non-fiction delivered in a way that is factual, informative, but at the same time naturally entertaining and moving, written with candour and humour. And if you have ever thought what it takes to become a paramedic - or any other of the specialist vocations - and that you could never achieve it yourself, Andy’s inspiring story of how he went from postman to frontline healthcare professional, fulfilling his dream, will make you think again that anything is possible if you have the desire. Andy says there are no heroics in the book and that he simply did his job, but we are sure The Dark Side will leave you convinced there are true heroes on our streets right here, right now. Saving lives every day, every night and often against all the odds. It might even change your whole perspective on life.

    • Biography & True Stories
      October 2014

      The Dark Side, Part 2 - Real Life Accounts of an NHS Paramedic

      The Traumatic, the Tragic and the Tearful

      by Andy Thompson

      Following up on his well-received first book, Andy Thompson provides another captivating, thought-provoking and at times intense glimpse into the daily life of a Paramedic working in the UK’s National Health Service. In the style of his first book, Andy recalls each event from the detailed documentation recorded at the time, each account written in a way that puts the reader right there next to him so that you live the events in real-time, hear the dialogue between paramedics, patient, their loved ones and other healthcare professionals as it would have been, and share in Andy’s thought processes during each of the ten very different situations he encounters. The term ‘The Dark Side’ describes the frontline emergency aspect of the Ambulance Service, since paramedics frequently experience sombre situations. In ‘The Dark Side, Part 2’ you will share in some truly traumatic, tragic and tearful events involving a seemingly vibrant, healthy young patient, a prison inmate, the victims of an horrific car crash, heart attacks, a frightening epileptic fit, the alarming effects of an allergic reaction, and what can happen when under-strain doctors prescribe the wrong medication. But there’s still room for lighthearted moments and a taste of the sometimes dark humour that allows paramedics to continually deal with events most of us would find too horrific. The detail in the descriptions of the care given to each patient on-scene by Andy and his colleagues will have you marvelling at the ability of these healthcare professionals to work at such speed of thought, buying enough time to deliver a patient into the specialist hands of hospital care and often full recovery. Of course there are inevitably also those times when tears of hope turn to tears of despair for loved ones. You cannot feel that pain until it happens to you, but this book will bring you mighty close to it at times.

    • National liberation & independence, post-colonialism
      March 2010

      Dublin Castle and the Anglo-Irish War

      Counter Insurgency and Conflict

      by Author(s): Eamonn T. Gardiner

      The Irish War of Independence is still regarded as a conflict that is both enigmatic and emotive in content; it transformed the British imperial dream into a nightmare and was to shape the foreign and domestic agendas of two countries for nearly a century. This book seeks to examine the reasons and ask the hard questions to determine why the British state was unable to pour oil on troubled Irish waters and put Home Rule to bed and how that inability was left to fester. It examines in detail the relationships which existed between the arms of the British administration in Ireland and how the complexity of those bonds led sometimes to an animosity of sorts being fostered until it began to affect operational aspects of the British security apparatus in Ireland.' The operations and actions of British Army, the Royal Irish Constabulary, their mercenary Auxiliary security forces and the Bristish Government of the day are all probed and examined in this book. Why were the British, with massive imperial holdings and a modern and well equipped armed forces, unable to suppress an infant insurgency, numerically inferior and ill equipped less than four hundred miles from Whitehall? Why was the shining light of British colonial policing, the Royal Irish Constabulary subjected to stagnation and rot from within for over fifty years? Why instead of reforming the existing police in place in Ireland mercenary forces, with little official oversight, were introduced into Ireland in an effort to quell the rising trouble?

    • Social issues & processes
      July 2014

      Community Policing as a Public Policy

      Challenges and Recommendations

      by Author(s): Satyajit Mohanty, Rabindra K Mohanty

      Keeping in view the role of the police in a modern society, the respect for the rule of law and the trust of the community as a critical resource, more and more police organizations around the world have embraced Community Policing with the objective of making the police sensitive to the needs of the community. However, in the absence of an institutional and legal framework and a resultant lack of understanding of the dynamics of policy processes, many such initiatives failed to stand the test of time.Against this backdrop, this book explains community policing from the perspective of public policy, not merely as an organisational philosophy to be adopted by police departments in a piecemeal manner, but as a long term, sustainable and robust organizational strategy. A model has been developed by triangulating the theories and praxis of Community Policing and organising them in a Context-Process-Outcome matrix in respect of pre-implementation, implementation and impact phases. As the net outcome of the field study, a set of challenges and recommendations have been spelled out to serve as guidelines for both policy makers and implementers in their efforts to introduce community policing as a public policy.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      April 2010

      Spooked

      Britain, Empire and Intelligence since 1945

      by Editor(s): Patrick Major and Christopher R. Moran

      In recent years the subject of intelligence has well and truly come out of the shadows. The terrorist attacks of 9/11 and 7/7, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, debates about domestic surveillance, secret detention and rendition have all brought unprecedented notoriety and exposure to the work of the intelligence services. In a media world, both the limitations and abuses of intelligence have never been more visible. Faced with the threat of militant jihadism, public expectations of intelligence have greatly increased, as have calls for more transparency about combatting this new menace. These essays draw together Britain's leading intelligence historians to present a fresh and original study of British secrecy since 1945. A combination of synoptic works and empirical case studies, drawing on recently declassified archival materials, the essays touch upon several historiographical concerns: the advantages and disadvantages of greater openness; the accuracy of media reporting on secret services; the representation of intelligence in popular culture; and the use and misuse of intelligence in the so-called ‘War on Terror’. A focal point of this volume is the role of intelligence in imperial contexts, especially during the period of decolonisation. The contributors include Richard Aldrich, Christopher Andrew, Philip Davies, Anthony Glees, Rob Johnson, Philip Murphy and Calder Walton.

    • National liberation & independence, post-colonialism
      March 2010

      Dublin Castle and the Anglo-Irish War

      Counter Insurgency and Conflict

      by Author(s): Eamonn T. Gardiner

      The Irish War of Independence is still regarded as a conflict that is both enigmatic and emotive in content; it transformed the British imperial dream into a nightmare and was to shape the foreign and domestic agendas of two countries for nearly a century. This book seeks to examine the reasons and ask the hard questions to determine why the British state was unable to pour oil on troubled Irish waters and put Home Rule to bed and how that inability was left to fester. It examines in detail the relationships which existed between the arms of the British administration in Ireland and how the complexity of those bonds led sometimes to an animosity of sorts being fostered until it began to affect operational aspects of the British security apparatus in Ireland.' The operations and actions of British Army, the Royal Irish Constabulary, their mercenary Auxiliary security forces and the Bristish Government of the day are all probed and examined in this book. Why were the British, with massive imperial holdings and a modern and well equipped armed forces, unable to suppress an infant insurgency, numerically inferior and ill equipped less than four hundred miles from Whitehall? Why was the shining light of British colonial policing, the Royal Irish Constabulary subjected to stagnation and rot from within for over fifty years? Why instead of reforming the existing police in place in Ireland mercenary forces, with little official oversight, were introduced into Ireland in an effort to quell the rising trouble?

    • Police & security services

      Police Leadership in the 21st Century

      Philosophy, Doctrine and Developments

      by Robert Adlam (Author), Peter Villiers (Author)

      This title looks at the extensive research on the topic of leadership and concludes by suggesting certain simple but fundamental rules - or "Golden Rules" - for police leaders.

    • True crime

      The Bigmen

      Personal Memories of Glasgow's Police

      by Joe Pieri

      The Northern Division was the name given to the police force which operated within Glasgow City boundaries prior to the creation of the Strathclyde Police Force. Its recruits were drawn largely from ex-servicement who were demobbed after World War II and, as a result, they became known as The Big Men. Their name was well-deserved as they set about clearing Glasgow's streets of the gangland "neds" who had overrun the city during the war. They took no prisoners and gained a fearsome reputation for no-nonsense street policing.;This biography is written by a man who was close to them. Joe Pieri's cafe, the Savoy in Cowcaddens, was a haunt for policemen on the beat, with a blue police box situated just outside. The back shop often had a policeman in it, keeping an eye on the blue light atop the box as he made out his beat journal or had a drink. Cowcaddens was a tough city which added to the reputation of Glasgow as a mean city, but Joe has maintained a living record of what those days were really like. In this volume, he offers an insight into how the city was tamed and crime kept in check by the Big Men.

    • Police & security services

      Policing a Safe, Just and Tolerant Society

      An International Model for Policing

      by Robert Adlam (Author), Peter Villiers (Author)

      Argues that policing by consent and democratic leadership fit together and that autocratic leadership has no place in modern policing. This title is of interest to police officers interested in the question whether three objectives of government policy may only be capable of delivery through ethical, effective and appropriately resourced policing.

    • Police & security services

      Principled Policing

      Protecting the Public With Integrity

      by John Alderson (Author)

      The author of this book describes how it is all too easy for quite "ordinary" police officers to descend into behaviour which is difficult to comprehend, as a result of state manoeuvring, police culture, and what he believes is a lack of any fundamental values for police work. Through an account of what Alderson calls "high police", and by way of examples from around the world - including Northern Ireland, Tiananmen Square, Nazi Germany, J. Edgar Hoover's days at the FBI, and the British miners' strike of 1984/85 - he advocates the creation of a code of principles designed to act as a touchstone for police everywhere.

    • Police & security services

      Covert Human Intelligence Sources

      The 'Unlovely' Face of Police Work

      by Roger Billingsley (Author)

      A unique insight into the hidden world of informers and related aspects of covert policing. Edited by Roger Billingsley, head of the Covert Policing Standards Unit at New Scotland Yard, this book is the first to look behind the scenes of undercover police work since the authorities lifted the rules on secrecy. Covert Human Intelligence Sources (CHIS) covers such key matters as: What is meant by CHIS The legal framework The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA) Inherent powers and the position at Common Law ‘Informers’ and ‘informants’ Working methods and oversight Handlers, controllers and authorising officers Dangers and risks Human rights, proportionality and ‘necessity’ Corruption and ‘noble cause corruption’ Protection and the duty of care Undercover officers: strains, duties and requirements ‘Official’ participation in crime: how far is it legal? Motives of informers Records and management of information Juvenile informers Texts, public interest immunity and anonymity Debriefing and human memory The context of informer relationships ‘Ownership’ of intelligence and communications A European perspective General background, views and opinions Contributors: Jonathan Lennon, Clive Harfield, Ben Fitzpatrick, John Potts, Kingsley Hyland OBE, John Buckley, Alisdair Gillespie and Michael Fishwick. With a preface by John Grieve QPM and a Foreword by Jon Murphy QPM Roger Billingsley has served for 32 years in the English police service, mainly within the field of criminal investigation. He was actively involved in the world of informers - as a handler, controller and authorising officer - and now heads London’s Metropolitan Police Service Covert Policing Standards Unit, dealing with every aspect of covert policing, including informers.

    • Sociology

      Fire Management in the American West

      Forest Politics and the Rise of Megafires

      by Mark Hudson

      Most journalists and academics attribute the rise of wildfires in the western United States to the USDA Forest Service's successful fire-elimination policies of the twentieth century. However, in Fire Management in the American West, Mark Hudson argues that although a century of suppression did indeed increase the hazard of wildfire, the responsibility does not lie with the USFS alone. The roots are found in the Forest Service's relationships with other, more powerful elements of society -- the timber industry in particular. Drawing on correspondence both between and within the Forest Service and the major timber industry associations, newspaper articles, articles from industry outlets, and policy documents from the late 1800s through the present, Hudson shows how the US forest industry, under the constraint of profitability, pushed the USFS away from private industry regulation and toward fire exclusion, eventually changing national forest policy into little more than fire policy. More recently, the USFS has attempted to move beyond the policy of complete fire suppression. Interviews with public land managers in the Pacific Northwest shed light on the sources of the agency's struggles as it attempts to change the way we understand and relate to fire in the West. This book will be of great interest to environmentalists, sociologists, fire managers, scientists, and academics and students in environmental history and forestry.

    • Fiction

      Red Flag Warning

      A Serial Arson Mystery

      by Kurt Kamm

      Los Angeles County is burning. A serial arsonist is setting the parched hills on fire. Plunge into infernos and face the smoke, heat and danger with the men on the fire lines. While NiteHeat prowls in the darkness, setting fires and taunting investigators, the Los Angeles County Fire Department’s Arson Unit struggles to find the fire-setter and stop the devastation. Who is NiteHeat? Is it Ruffy, the 911 dispatcher who has failed firefighter training? Is it Mikey, a dropout who appears at every fire and steals firefighting equipment? Is it Father Dom who claims the fires are started by Satan? Discover the incendiary device triggered by a cooking timer from Williams Sonoma. Did you ever wonder how wildland arson investigators find the point of origin and evidence in a fire which consumes thousands of acres? Did you ever wonder what goes through the mind of an arsonist? Read RED FLAG WARNING.

    • Adventure

      Tales From The Cross

      by David Marcus

      For a short period around 1994, the author piloted a number of air ambulance flights around South Africa and its neighbouring countries. During this time, he encountered circumstances that were often extraordinary … poignant, comic, embarrassing, or bizarre to an extent that merited documentation, particularly when extrapolated against an African backdrop already liberally littered with unlikely events. The manuscript is a fictionalised account of those experiences. “Tales from the Cross” comprises 60,000 words, organised as a prologue, eight chapters, and a postscript. It follows the strange adventures of Harry Kamel, attorney and part-time air ambulance pilot, in his travels across Southern Africa on missions of mercy. Each chapter comprises a self-contained episode, although the key characters migrate from chapter to chapter across the manuscript. The central plot of each episode (but one) is essentially true, with actual identities and places disguised.

    • Fiction
      November 2011

      Code Blood

      by Kurt Kamm

      Colt Lewis, a rookie fire paramedic, is obsessed with finding the severed foot of his first victim after she dies in his arms. His search takes him into the connected lives of a graduate research student, with the rarest blood in the world and the vampire fetishist who is stalking her. Within the corridors of high-stakes medical research laboratories, the shadow world of body parts dealers, and the underground Goth clubs of Los Angeles, Lewis uncovers a tangled maze of needles, drugs and maniacal ritual, all of which lead to death. But whose death? An unusual and fast-paced LA Noir thriller.

    • Adventure
      September 2012

      ONE FOOT IN THE BLACK

      by Kurt Kamm

      One Foot in the Black tells the coming-of-age story of a young wildland firefighter. At eighteen, Greg Kowalski, leaves an abusive home in Michigan for California to become a helitack (helicopter attack) wildland firefighter. He finds a new family in fire crew but suffers the loss of his captain and mentor while fighting a major burn on a mountainside. In time, Greg comes to terms with the death of his captain but has greater difficulty overcoming his abusive father s influence on his life.

    • Police & security services

      Police and Policing

      An Introduction

      by Peter Villiers (Author)

      An ideal introduction for police recruits, criminal justice practitioners, criminologists and general readers. Written in a clear style and based on the experiences of author Peter Villiers who was for many years a tutor at the National Police Staff College, Bramshill. A convenient handbook for anyone wanting an accessible yet thought-provoking account of a key public institution. Also contains a Glossary of Words, Phrases, Acronyms and Abbreviations and a Timeline. Covers such key topics as * The nature and purposes of policing * A short History * The ‘original authority’ of police constables * Police forces and police authorities * Detective work * Squads, teams, units and operations * Training and leadership * Crime prevention and crime reduction * Forensics, science and technology * Powers of arrest, detention and charge * Ethics, discipline and integrity * Common standards and values * Protection of the public * Terrorism (including modern-day powers) * The Serious Organized Crime Agency * Police community support officers * Corruption and the use of ‘deception’ * Policing in the era of human rights * Interpol and Europol * Examples of policing from abroad

    • Police & security services

      Policing Notting Hill

      Fifty Years of Turbulence

      by Tony Moore (Author)

      Notting Hill is one of the most sought after locations in London. But its progress from ‘ghetto’ to gentrification spans half-a-century within which it was one of the most turbulent places in Britain—plagued by decline, disadvantage, unsolved killings, riots, illegal drugs, underground bars (or ‘shebeens’), prostitution, ‘no-go areas’ and racial tension. It was also populated by characters such as self-styled community organizer Frank Crichlow, slum landlord Peter Rachman, Christine Keeler, the Angry Brigade, ‘hustlers’ such as ‘Lucky’ Gordon and Johnny Edgecombe, the activist Michael X (later executed in Trinidad) and the occasional radical Lawyer. It was the location of the racist murder of Kelso Cochrane, the litigation-minded Mangrove Restaurant, the brief surge of Black Power in the UK and most notably the iconic Notting Hill Carnival with its heady mix of festivity, excitement, street crimes, potential for disorder and confrontations with the police. So what was it like operating in this ‘Symbolic Location’? In this book, Tony Moore, one of those in charge of policing Notting Hill, shows how the area continually adapted to challenges that first began after the Empire Windrush arrived in England carrying immigrants who were initially met by signs saying ‘No Coloured’, but for whom Notting Hill became an area of choice. It is a wide-ranging account of the factors in play at a time of unprecedented social change, told from the perspective of an ‘insider’, based on prodigious research including in relation to hitherto unpublished materials and personal communications. ‘Tony Moore is well-fitted to write a History of Notting Hill and its relationship with the Metropolitan Police’: Lord Blair of Boughton. ‘All Saints Road in Notting Hill is one of those areas of London, where crime is at its worst, where drug-dealing is intolerably overt and where the racial ingredient is at its most potent’: Sir Kenneth Newman, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police. ‘From the late sixties until recently, All Saints Road was to drugs what Hatton Garden is to diamonds’: Robert Hardman, The Spectator.

    • Fiction

      Before Nightfall

      by Rachel Amphlett

      “If they move you, they will kill you.” Kate Foster is quick to forget the advice from a pre-deployment hostage survival course once she’s catapulted into a new job in Eastern Europe, despite the good-looking instructor. But a simple day’s task in Istanbul six months later goes horribly wrong. Trapped and alone, her only hope of survival is the man who trained her – ex-FBI Hostage Rescue Specialist, Finn Scott. For Finn, it’s his worst nightmare. Kate was the one person he almost let into his heart. Haunted by memories of a failed hostage rescue, he is thrust into a situation beyond his control. Now, against a sinister adversary whose ambitions will split apart Eastern Europe, Finn must overcome his demons to prevent an international catastrophe, and avoid losing Kate forever.

    • Biography & True Stories
      November 2014

      The Soho Don

      by Michael Connor

      The Soho Don is the story of a shy south London boy from a respectable family who became a shadowy, but powerful figure in the Soho, Mayfair and Brighton underworlds.

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