• Self-help & personal development

      I Believe Therefore I Am

      How to Deliberately Live Your Life by Programming Your Mind for Success, Happiness, Love, and Fulfillment

      by Claire McGee, M.Msc

      What do you need to do to get your subconscious mind to believe and work cooperatively with your conscious efforts to manifest what you desire in life? Your reality is composed of habits formed through many years of self-programming. These habits influence and define your beliefs, which cause you to experience the same patterns in your life over and over again — for good or bad. Whatever you believe is your “reality” becomes your reality. Through a process of self-reflection and realization guided by author, consultant, and coach Claire McGee, you will discover how to eliminate your bad habits and enhance your good habits. You will delve into what the “Law of Attraction” is and what you can do to master your own success using this most incredible tool. Even before you finish this incredible book, you will come to know that your journey is just beginning and that the only limits that you face are the ones that you believe are there. Because of the ideas, methods, and skills you will learn in this book, you will become balanced in all areas of your thinking and action and you will begin to deliberately live the life of your own choosing — a life of success, happiness, love, and fulfillment.

    • Self-help & personal development

      Keeping the Faith

      Daily Reflections to Build Strength, Serenity, and Passion in Your Life and the Lives of Others

      by John W. Pozzi

      THE TRUE FAITH THAT MUST BE FOUND AND KEPT IS THE FAITH IN ONESELF. Each day you give a part of yourself whether it is at work, at home, or in your daily interaction with others. How do you give of yourself? Do you hold back or go at life half-heartedly? You need to give of yourself with heart, mind, and soul all the time. You never know what interaction with a person will make a difference in their life — or yours. If you don’t believe in yourself and don’t have the confidence to grow each day, then you are missing out on what life has to offer you. This simple book will inspire you to help others. Or, at the very least, you will make another person’s day — and, therefore, your day — better.

    • Psychology
      May 2012

      The Key to a Loving & Lasting Relationship

      by Dr. Sonja H. Snyman

      What makes some couples achieve happy long-lasting relationships, while others, try and try but do not? The human quest for a successful long-term relationship has produced a plethora of hypotheses, psychological theories and a lot of popular advice about how to improve relationships. This book is about how to forge a successful, lasting relationship by accepting and practising the good-enough paradigm. Psychologists, counsellors and individuals are offered a new way of understanding and looking at relationships. A new perspective shows how to leave old hurts behind, how to understand destructive behaviour patters and how to gain new insights into whether one is trapped in the blame game or in sabotaging behaviour. One will learn that no relationship has a fairy-tale ending. One will also come to realise that by accepting a relationship as being "good-enough", it will be one of the most liberating and empowering shifts that one will ever make.

    • Counselling & advice services
      January 1997

      Assertiveness

      A Practical Approach

      by Clare Ward, Stephanie Holland

      This highly successful title offers an opportunity for professionals from all backgrounds to develop an understanding of assertiveness. which has been shown to be therapeutically advantageous for all kinds of client groups and can be useful in many contexts. It is a highly practical working manual from which you can apply the principles of assertiveness both to yourself and to your clients. Contents: Behaviour types Being assertive Our right to be assertive Owning our feelings Refusing and requesting Self respect Criticism & conflict Sexuality The assertive option Clinical application.

    • Counselling & advice services
      July 2008

      Big Book of Blobs

      by Pip Wilson, Ian Long

      A photocopiable collection of blob pictures to promote discussion. These blob pictures offer a unique way to initiate discussion about all sorts of issues and subjects. They are organised into themes and scenarios that include: Places - beach, cinema, cliff, concert, disco, homes, playground, staffroom, village Issues - bullying, death, disaster, divide, fame, families, feast, money, parents, protests, romance, sleep, talk, water safety, world Occasions - Christmas, Easter, football, lecture, nativity, Olympics, skateboarding Personal Development - body, caged, caring, doors, leaps, river, rock, shadows, valley, vertigo. Each picture is accompanied by ideas and questions to kick-start class, group or one-to-one discussion. Complete book included on accompanying CD Rom.

    • Philosophy
      July 2013

      Philosophy, Counseling, and Psychotherapy

      by Editor(s): Elliot D. Cohen and Samuel Zinaich, Jr.

      Can philosophy help ordinary people confront their personal or interpersonal problems of living? Can it help a couple whose marriage is on the rocks, or someone going through a midlife crisis, or someone depressed over the death of a significant other, or who suffers from anxiety about making a life change? These and many other behavioral and emotional problems are ordinarily referred to psychologists, psychiatrists, clinical social workers, or other mental health specialists. Less mainstream is the possibility of consulting a philosophical counselor or practitioner. Yet, there is presently a steadily increasing, world-wide movement among individuals with postgraduate credentials in philosophy to harness their philosophical training and skills in helping others to address their life problems.But is this channeling of philosophy outside the classroom into the arena of life a good idea? Are philosophers, as such, competent to handle all or any of the myriad emotional and behavioral problems that arise in the context of life; or should these matters best be left to those trained in psychological counseling or psychotherapy?Through a diverse and contrasting set of readings authored by prominent philosophers, philosophical counselors, and psychologists, this volume carefully explores the nature of philosophical counseling or practice and its relationship to psychological counseling and psychotherapy. Digging deeply into this relational question, this volume aims to spark more rational reflection, and greater sensitivity and openness to the potential contributions of philosophical practice. It is, accordingly, intended for students, teachers, scholars, and practitioners of philosophy, counseling, or psychotherapy; as well as those interested in knowing more about philosophical counseling or practice.

    • Social, group or collective psychology
      February 2016

      Threads of Hope

      Counselling and Emotional Support Services for Communities in Crisis

      by Author(s): Susan Dale

      On 1st October 2012, April Jones, aged 5, was abducted from outside her home in the small Welsh market town of Machynlleth. This led to the largest police search operation of its kind ever conducted in the UK, and a subsequent murder investigation and trial which was scrutinised by the international media.This book uses a collaborative narrative research process to explore the lived experiences of one specific group of community members who responded to this event by setting up, and running, a therapeutic project to support the community between 2012 and 2014.The author weaves together threads of the story taken from her own ethnographic journal, and co-researcher accounts, together with community updates taken from press releases and academic theory, to create an evocative narrative account that will enable readers to understand what it may be like to be involved in a therapeutic project of this kind. The book highlights some of the challenges and offers suggestions for community leaders, therapeutic practitioners and critical incident planners who may be considering setting up support in response to community trauma.

    • Social, group or collective psychology
      February 2016

      Threads of Hope

      Counselling and Emotional Support Services for Communities in Crisis

      by Author(s): Susan Dale

      On 1st October 2012, April Jones, aged 5, was abducted from outside her home in the small Welsh market town of Machynlleth. This led to the largest police search operation of its kind ever conducted in the UK, and a subsequent murder investigation and trial which was scrutinised by the international media.This book uses a collaborative narrative research process to explore the lived experiences of one specific group of community members who responded to this event by setting up, and running, a therapeutic project to support the community between 2012 and 2014.The author weaves together threads of the story taken from her own ethnographic journal, and co-researcher accounts, together with community updates taken from press releases and academic theory, to create an evocative narrative account that will enable readers to understand what it may be like to be involved in a therapeutic project of this kind. The book highlights some of the challenges and offers suggestions for community leaders, therapeutic practitioners and critical incident planners who may be considering setting up support in response to community trauma.

    • Philosophy
      November 2016

      The Philosophy Clinic

      Practical Wisdom at Work

      by Author(s): Stephen J. Costello

      This collection of essays and interviews highlights the modern movement of ‘philosophical practice’. Taking their cue and call from Socrates’ summons to ‘know thyself’, contemporary philosophical counsellors and practitioners have returned to the ancient understanding of philosophy as consolation and contemplation, as a life directed to the loving search for wisdom and clarity. Socrates and the Stoics continued this tradition, seeing philosophy primarily as a practical way of living in alignment with oneself and the logos. Thus interpreted, philosophy is a path, teaches a method more than pronounces a thesis, and issues a living praxis devoted to daily spiritual exercises whose aim is nothing less than the transformation of the self – a metamorphosis of the personality. This conception of philosophy’s essence was lost, but was later retrieved by certain philosophers, such as Viktor Frankl and Ludwig Wittgenstein, in the twentieth-century, who have unleashed and uncovered philosophy’s original therapeutic impulse and intent. As such, this book will prove of inestimable value to philosophers, psychologists, psychotherapists, psychiatrists, counsellors, clients, and students of these disciplines.

    • Ethical issues & debates
      April 2010

      Where Angels Fear to Tread

      An Exploration of having Conversations about Suicide in a Counselling Context

      by Author(s): Susan Dale

      Where Angels Fear to Tread highlights some of the ethical and emotional challenges which arise for counsellors when their clients’ thoughts and behaviours become suicidal. It gives insight into how people can, and do, use suicide as a way of coping with overwhelming emotional pain, and the tension this creates in the balance between the ethical guidelines the counselling profession has adopted to protect clients against malpractice (and protect counsellors against litigation) and the needs and viewpoint of the client.The book also shows a dynamic narrative research methodology in action. There has been a deliberate move away from the traditional “expert” and “subject” positions predominating research, and priority given to the telling of previously marginalised stories in ways that are evocative, congruent with the therapeutic endeavour. The research process is shown as a social construction of lived experience that navigates the borders between narrative research and narrative therapy conveying a distinctive perspective on both the subject matter and the dynamics of both therapeutic and research relationships.

    • Social welfare & social services
      April 2015

      Innovative Practice and Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Psychosocial Difficulties and Disabilities

      by Editor(s): Elias Kourkoutas, Angie Hart

      This book engages with a wide spectrum of questions and topics related to children’s, adolescents’ and families’ difficulties, as well as to epistemological, meta-theoretical, taxonomical, and intervention issues. Particular emphasis is given throughout the book to discussing and suggesting various alternative methods and practices of promoting the potential and capacity of children, families, and schools to deal with various personal and contextual risks and adversities. Most of the contributions brought together in this volume highlight the psychosocial and community and especially school-based and child-centered paradigm focusing not only on the treatment of children’s deficits, but mainly, and above all, on strengthening and sharpening their social, emotional and learning skills and on promoting child, family, and social-school resources and resilience. Integrating various innovative or traditional techniques in a wider psychosocial and resilient inclusive perspective is one of the most promising approaches to childhood disorder and disability. This book presents these fundamentally important issues within the context of up-to-date research on vulnerability and resilience that helps strengthen family and child-school relationships, and will enable professionals, teachers, and parents to deal with a plethora of difficulties and risks in childhood and adolescence.

    • Social, group or collective psychology
      May 2011

      Songs at Twilight

      A Narrative Exploration of Living with a Visual Impairment and the Effect this has on Claims to Identity

      by Author(s): Susan Dale

      The majority of research and writing about visual impairment is influenced by medical models of understanding, and is usually undertaken by sighted experts about those who are visually impaired. Songs at Twilight takes a different stance and uses a collaborative narrative methodology to enable the author, who is visually impaired, and thirty contributors, who are also visually impaired, to explore their experiences of living with a visual impairment and the effect this has had on their claims to identity.The dynamic research process is shown as a social construction of lived experience where questions of identity are addressed through conversation and narrative. Sighted assumptions about blindness are challenged as the author and contributors discuss aspects of diagnosis and treatment, education, employment, societal attitudes towards blindness, relationships, treatment possibilities, emotional support (including counselling) and emancipatory research practices.

    • Ethical issues & debates
      April 2010

      Where Angels Fear to Tread

      An Exploration of having Conversations about Suicide in a Counselling Context

      by Author(s): Susan Dale

      Where Angels Fear to Tread highlights some of the ethical and emotional challenges which arise for counsellors when their clients’ thoughts and behaviours become suicidal. It gives insight into how people can, and do, use suicide as a way of coping with overwhelming emotional pain, and the tension this creates in the balance between the ethical guidelines the counselling profession has adopted to protect clients against malpractice (and protect counsellors against litigation) and the needs and viewpoint of the client.The book also shows a dynamic narrative research methodology in action. There has been a deliberate move away from the traditional “expert” and “subject” positions predominating research, and priority given to the telling of previously marginalised stories in ways that are evocative, congruent with the therapeutic endeavour. The research process is shown as a social construction of lived experience that navigates the borders between narrative research and narrative therapy conveying a distinctive perspective on both the subject matter and the dynamics of both therapeutic and research relationships.

    • Social, group or collective psychology
      May 2011

      Songs at Twilight

      A Narrative Exploration of Living with a Visual Impairment and the Effect this has on Claims to Identity

      by Author(s): Susan Dale

      The majority of research and writing about visual impairment is influenced by medical models of understanding, and is usually undertaken by sighted experts about those who are visually impaired. Songs at Twilight takes a different stance and uses a collaborative narrative methodology to enable the author, who is visually impaired, and thirty contributors, who are also visually impaired, to explore their experiences of living with a visual impairment and the effect this has had on their claims to identity.The dynamic research process is shown as a social construction of lived experience where questions of identity are addressed through conversation and narrative. Sighted assumptions about blindness are challenged as the author and contributors discuss aspects of diagnosis and treatment, education, employment, societal attitudes towards blindness, relationships, treatment possibilities, emotional support (including counselling) and emancipatory research practices.

    • Business & management
      March 2012

      How to Coach a Woman

      A Practitioner's Manual : A Refreshingly Different Guide to Becoming an Ethical and Responsible Coach

      by Lynette Allen and Meg Reid

      Can you keep a secret? What if a woman took you into her confidence and told you how she really felt about her life, her ambitions, her expectations of herself, her disappointments, her successes, would you know what to say? What if she told you life wasn’t quite what she’d planned, that cracks were starting to appear, or that she was unsure of her next move… how would you answer? This handbook is your answer. The only guide a Coach for women will ever need. Lynette Allen & Meg Reid between them have more than 20 years experience of coaching women from every walk of life, on just about every topic you can imagine. They’ve been successfully training Coaches too and have poured everything they know into this unique book. Discover their secrets, tips, techniques, exercises and tools. Dispel the myths of coaching, understand the ethics and responsibility of taking on this vital role and you’ll find a refreshingly different way to connect with your female employees or clients.

    • Abnormal psychology
      June 2013

      DYSLEXIA DISMANTLED

      A practical breakdown of the myths and realities of dyslexia

      by Laughton King

      Finally, an insightful, clear and practical breakdown of the realities of dyslexia, from the author’s own life experience. This exposition of the thinking, learning and living style that characterise the dyslexic individual is written equally for the educator, the parent and the struggling dyslexic himself. Eighteen myths dispelled, 61 personal characteristics outlined, and a raft of indicators examined, this book will help a large section of the population understand their own normality, their own intact and integrated thinking style, and allow them to take positive charge of their learning processes and their functioning in society. There is nothing wrong with their brain wiring, they are not deficient, they do not need medication. As a diesel motor differs from a petrol engine, the so-called ‘dyslexic’ differs from the non-dyslexic in a simple and rudimentary way. The Western world has a modern education system based around language as the prime learning tool – teaching, learning and assessment are typically language-based. The ‘dyslexic’ person is disadvantaged in this system, not only because is he a pictorial thinker, but because of a lesser capacity to use 'internal dialogue', he is unable to process the language-based education system at a competitive level.

    • Health & Personal Development
      2014

      THE POWER OF SIX

      A Six Part Guide to Self Knowledge

      by Philip Harland

      What is Emergent Self Knowledge, what are the Powers of Six, and what role do they play in self-development and therapeutic change? In this book by a leading authority in the field, you will learn a great deal that is new about psychology and the step-by-step practicality of change. If you are a coach, consultant, counsellor, health professional, psychologist, psychotherapist, psychiatrist, teacher or trainer – a facilitator of others – you will learn how to progress your clients more easily and safely. They will work through their traumas without being retraumatized and at the end of the day they will own their own process. They will heal themselves. When conventional commonsense or intelligence fail us, the Power of Six is a means of tapping into the reservoirs of our own wisdom. Philip Harland is a Clean Language psychotherapist and leading authority on Emergent Knowledge and the Power of Six, having worked closely on its development with the originator of the process, the innovative therapist David Grove. They co-facilitated many clients and ran seminars together in Britain, France and New Zealand.Philip is also the author of a definitive book on Clean Language: ‘Trust Me, I’m The Patient: Clean Language, Metaphor and the New Psychology of Change’ and three short Clean Language–related books ‘Resolving Problem Patterns with Clean Language and Autogenic Metaphor’, ‘Possession and Desire: working with Addiction, Compulsion and Dependency’ and ‘How The Brain Feels: working with Emotion and Cognition’; all published by Wayfinder Press. For more on these books go to Amazon or to www.wayfinderpress.co.uk

    • Health & Personal Development
      2014

      HOW THE BRAIN FEELS

      Working with Emotion and Cognition

      by Philip Harland

      “Let my heart be wise. It is the gods’ best gift.” Euripides Models of facilitation (therapy, counselling, teaching, coaching, health management, etc.) have rarely dealt with the inter-dependency of emotion and cognition. In the 1980s, NLP researchers developed the concept of the structure of emotion. Work in the 1980s on ‘Meta-States’ addressed the modulating of primary emotional states with cognitively-led meta-levels of feeling. Here Clean Language psychotherapist and NLP Master Practitioner Philip Harland explores the neuro-linguistic basis of Emotional Intelligence, relating recent work on the structure and relationship of emotion and cognition to innovative therapist David Grove’s work in Clean Language and Therapeutic Metaphor. Philip worked for many years with the late David Grove. They co-facilitated many clients together and ran seminars in Britain, France and New Zealand. Philip Harland is a Clean Language psychotherapist and NLP Master Practitioner. He is also the author of ‘Trust Me, I’m The Patient: Clean Language, Metaphor and the New Psychology of Change’; ‘The Power of Six: A Six Part Guide to Self Knowledge; and the two short Clean Language–related books ‘Resolving Problem Patterns with Clean Language and Autogenic Metaphor’ and ‘Possession and Desire: working with addiction, compulsion and dependency’; all published by Wayfinder Press. For more on these books go to Amazon or to www.wayfinderpress.co.uk

    • Health & Personal Development
      2014

      POSSESSION AND DESIRE

      Working with Addiction, Compulsion and Dependency

      by Philip Harland

      Understanding and working with addiction, compulsion and dependency; a 6-part guide for addicts, enablers and therapists“Choosing the temporary discomforts of desire over the permanent discomforts of possession” Part I VIOLENT PLEASURES ARE RELIEFS OF PAIN Each one of us is prone to addiction or dependency to a greater or lesser degree. Part I is about understanding why this is so. Part II SOME ADDICTIONS FEEL PHYSICAL, BUT ALL ADDICTIONS ARE MENTAL Addiction is a subject for study. Addicting is something we do. Part II follows the bodymind process of becoming addicted as a basis for deciding where we wish to go next. PART III THE PHYSICIAN’S PROVIDER How as therapists and facilitators do we position ourselves in relation to addictive clients? How does language affect our beliefs and practices? Part III discusses the difference between intervening and interfering, and between conscious and unconscious outcome forming. It suggests a way to align ourselves with the client’s outcome and to activate change without resorting to supposition, interpretation or suggestion. PART IV THE LIMIT OF DESIRES As addicts we give energy to a system that encourages us to play victim and persecutor in turn. Part IV examines the differences between ‘quitting’ and ‘controlling’. The continuum of progression from simple desire to complex need to total possession is explored. PART V ADDICTIVE CONTRADICTIONS Part V deconstructs typically addictive double-binds and dualities, including the familiar dilemma of being caught between aversion (‘I must give up X’) and attraction (‘I can’t give up X’). Eight approaches to resolving duality thinking are identified and explained PART VI AUDITING FOR X Unscrambles haphazard approaches to client assessment and offers a systematic audit for facilitators of all kinds, including self-helpers, to assess addictions, compulsions, and dependencies and to work successfully with them through language as an alternative to medical means. The audit is arranged in four frames: person, possession, pattern, and preference: Person: how much of the client is involved, and where? Possession: what is the nature of the client's attachment? Pattern: how do the client's life patterns and internal patterns relate? Preference: what choices does the client have? Most of us can learn to move from addictive state to non-addictive state. Those uncertain about the path to take will find the aids to navigation here useful both theoretically and practically. We may all – addicts and enablers, therapists and clients alike – learn to deal with the occasional discomforts of desire rather than the permanent discomforts of possession. Philip Harland is a Clean Language psychotherapist and author of ‘Trust Me, I’m the Patient: Clean Language, Metaphor, and the New Psychology of Change’; ‘The Power of Six, A Six Part Guide to Self Knowledge’; ‘Resolving Problem Patterns with Clean Language and Autogenic Metaphor’; and ‘How The Brain Feels: working with Emotion and Cognition’. All published by Wayfinder Press. For more on these books go to Amazon or to www.wayfinderpress.co.uk

    • Health & Personal Development
      2014

      RESOLVING PROBLEM PATTERNS

      with Clean Language and Autogenic Metaphor

      by Philip Harland

      How can problem patterns be discerned, decoded and the information within them released? This guide has five parts: ‘What is as Pattern?’ ‘How Can Patterns be Discerned?’ ‘How Can Problem Patterns be Decoded?’ ‘How Can the Information Within be Released?’ and ‘Then What Happens: the Nature of Change’. At a time when psychoactive drugs are being prescribed more widely than at any time in history, it is more important than ever to educate ourselves about the alternatives. The drug-free resolution of problem patterns of behavior, feeling or belief is as important for health professionals to be able to facilitate as it is for their clients and patients to achieve. This guide has a bias towards the talking therapies – and in particular the radical new art of Clean Language – but its precepts and procedures are applicable to any area of human enquiry. New, more productive, patterns of behaviour, feeling and belief emerge through CleanLanguage modelling as the client identifies component parts of their perceptions, develops these in form, space, or time; elucidates key relationships between them; discerns patterns across the relationships and translates these patterns to their everyday lives. As a result it is the client, not the facilitator, who determines the significance of their perceptions. And as the system learns about its own organization, a context for self-generated change is created and it is the client, not the facilitator, who determines what needs to happen for the system to evolve. Philip Harland is a Clean Language psychotherapist and author of ‘Trust Me, I’m the Patient: Clean Language, Metaphor and the New Psychology of Change’; ‘The Power of Six: a Six Part Guide to Self Knowledge’; ‘Possession and Desire: understanding and working with addiction, compulsion and dependency’; and ‘How the Brain Feels: working with emotion and cognition’; all published by Wayfinder Press, London England. For more on these books see Amazon and www.wayfinderpress.co.uk

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