• Christian social thought & activity
      December 2007

      Raised by the Church

      Growing up in New York City's Catholic Orphanages

      by Edward Rohs, and Judith Estrine

    • Charities, voluntary services & philanthropy

      Nipping Crime in the Bud

      How the Philanthropic Quest Was Put Into Law

      by Muriel Whitten (Author)

      At a time when problems of crime and antisocial behaviour stimulate debate on big society solutions, this book provides an exceptional means of tracing a line of response which began at the end of the 18th century. Nipping Crime in the Bud explores the origins and development of the Philanthropic Society (and its influence on contemporary institutions) amid growing alarm about crime levels, Draconian sentences under England’s Bloody Code and a paucity of effective crime prevention measures. Driven by Enlightenment zeal and ideals, this was the first voluntary sector charity devoted to ‘nipping crime in the bud’. It did so through education, training, accom­modation, mentoring and support for young people. Uniquely, the book traces the first hard won policy networks and partnerships between government and the voluntary sector. It reveals how—sometimes against the odds, with funding on a knife edge but constantly striving for effective answers—influential philan­thropists rose to the challenge and changed approaches to young people involved in crime and delinquency, traces of which endure today within the great crime prevention charities which still rally to this cause. Muriel Whitten’s book draws on previously neglected archival sources and other first-hand research to create a formidable and illuminating account about what, for many people, will be a missing chapter in English social and legal History.

    • Charities, voluntary services & philanthropy
      February 2015

      The Protestant Orphan Society and its social significance in Ireland 1828–1940

      by June Cooper

      The Protestant Orphan Society, founded in Dublin in 1828, managed a carefully-regulated boarding-out and apprenticeship scheme. This book examines its origins, its forward-thinking policies, and particularly its investment in children's health, the part women played in the charity, opposition to its work and the development of local Protestant Orphan Societies. It argues that by the 1860s the parent body in Dublin had become one of the most well-respected nineteenth-century Protestant charities and an authority in the field of boarding out. The author uses individual case histories to explore the ways in which the charity shaped the orphans' lives and assisted widows, including the sister of Sean O'Casey, the renowned playwright, and identifies the prominent figures who supported its work such as Douglas Hyde, the first President of Ireland. This book makes valuable contributions to the history of child welfare, foster care, the family and the study of Irish Protestantism.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2014

      The Protestant Orphan Society and its social significance in Ireland 1828–1940

      by June Cooper

      The Protestant Orphan Society, founded in Dublin in 1828, managed a carefully-regulated boarding-out and apprenticeship scheme. This book examines its origins, its forward-thinking policies, and particularly its investment in children's health, the part women played in the charity, opposition to its work and the development of local Protestant Orphan Societies. It argues that by the 1860s the parent body in Dublin had become one of the most well-respected nineteenth-century Protestant charities and an authority in the field of boarding out. The author uses individual case histories to explore the ways in which the charity shaped the orphans' lives and assisted widows, including the sister of Sean O'Casey, the renowned playwright, and identifies the prominent figures who supported its work such as Douglas Hyde, the first President of Ireland. This book makes valuable contributions to the history of child welfare, foster care, the family and the study of Irish Protestantism. ;

    • Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure
      April 2018

      Masala Mamas

      Recipes and stories from Indian women changing their communities through food and love

      by Elana Sztokman

      In the Kalwa slum in Mumbai, India, where harsh conditions make it difficult for some children to study, an amazing group of women is working to make sure that kids go to school. Meet the Masala Mamas, 16 women who live in the Kalwa slum who are dedicating their lives to providing hot meals for kids in school. Every morning, they cook hundreds of meals – hot nutritious meals from fresh ingredientsand aromatic spices. They cook with extra special love, care and dedication. Because their customers are the most important people in the world: children. These are their stories and their recipes. It is a cookbook like you’ve never seen before. It is about women, friendship, social change, Indian culture, and most of all love. All through food.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2018

      Corporate Citizenship

      The role of companies as citizens of the modern world

      by David Logan

      Private companies and multinationals have been around since the beginning of recorded history. For both good and ill they have done an immense amount to shape human culture around the world. We have just come through a period in history when communist and socialist societies tried to eliminate or severely constrain private enterprise, but companies are now back, big time. Consequently, the question now is: ‘What is their role in our global economic and social system?’ Providing goods and services and making a profit for their shareholders are important, but in that process, they also have responsibilities to their stakeholders and the wider society. Companies are in fact corporate citizens of society; just as individuals are private citizens. They exercise certain rights but also have profound responsibilities. They have to step up as good citizens and use their power and influence to help humanity face the challenges of the future. This book discusses why and how they must do that as a step towards learning to live with modern capitalism.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2010

      Charity With Choice

      by R. Mark Issac, Doug Norton, R. Mark Issac, Douglas A. Norton

      Four years ago "Research in Experimental Economics" published experimental evidence on fundraising and charitable contributions. This volume returns to the intrigue with philanthropy. Employing a mixture of laboratory and field experiments as well as theoretical research we present this new volume, "Charity with Choice". New waves of experiments are taking advantage of well calibrated environments established by past efforts to add new features to experiments such as endogeneity and self-selection. Adventurous new research programs are popping up and some of them are captured here in this volume. Among the major themes in which the tools of choice, endogeneity, and self-selection are employed are: What increases or decreases charitable activity? and How do organizational and managerial issues affect the performance of non-profit organizations?

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2014

      Social Entrepreneurship and Research Methods

      by Jeremy Short, David J. KetchenJr., Donald D. Bergh

      The mission of the Research Methodology in Strategy and Management book series is to provide a thoughtful medium to comment, critique, and build knowledge relevant to techniques that advance the strategic management field. This ninth volume in the series explores the theme of "Social Entrepreneurship and Research Methods." This volume provides a critical examination of previous approaches used to explore phenomena of interest in the growing study of social entrepreneurship. The importance of construct management in this emerging field is explored in depth, and the contributors to this volume provide thoughts on a number of valuable approaches to collect both qualitative and quantitative data germane to the study of social enterprise. This volume also highlights the promise of longitudinal techniques, the use of configurational approaches, and other techniques that allow for the incorporation of rich qualitative information to aid in the study of social enterprise growth and performance.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2011

      The Third Sector

      by Richard Hull, Jane Gibbon, Oana Branzei, Helen Haugh, Richard Hull

      The Third Sector is of increasing economic and political interest but has been relatively ignored by Critical Management Studies. The Sector includes charities and a range of organisations such as non-governmental, nonprofit, voluntary and community, but also those trading for a surplus but with prominent social commitments, such as housing associations, credit unions, worker or consumer co-operatives and social enterprises. This book presents cutting-edge international research from a variety of critical perspectives. The chapters include case studies from Japan, South Africa, Canada, Denmark, France, Wales and England, as well as a number of theoretically-based explorations of key issues in the analysis of the Third Sector. The chapters have been developed from presentations and lively discussion at the Critical Management Studies Workshop, Montreal, August 2010. "DCMS" is an innovative series applying Critical Management Studies to tightly specified topics. Each chapter is followed by a 1,000 word Commentary from a fellow contributor to the volume, and each volume is the product of a collaborative and developmental workshop.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2006

      Experiments Investigating Fundraising and Charitable Contributors

      by R.M. Isaac, Douglas D. Davis

      This volume consists of nine papers that use experimental and theoretical tools to examine issues pertaining to charitable auctions and fundraising. In recent years, the revenue-generating effects of different fundraising techniques have been a subject of increasing policy interest as private, religious and state originations have come to rely increasingly on fundraising activities for revenues. Experimental methods provide an ideal context for conducting the dialogue between economists, fundraisers and policymakers regarding the revenue and social consequences of alternative fundraising methods. Themes explored in the volume include the structure of charity auctions, charity lotteries, fund drives as well as some of broader issues underlying charitable behaviour. It explores the structure of different fundraising and charitable programs. It is a valuable resource for economists, fundraisers and policymakers interested in the consequences of their fundraising efforts.

    • Charities, voluntary services & philanthropy

      The Protestant Orphan Society and its social significance in Ireland 1828–1940

      by June Cooper

      The Protestant Orphan Society, founded in Dublin in 1828, managed a carefully-regulated boarding-out and apprenticeship scheme. This book examines its origins, its forward-thinking policies, and particularly its investment in children's health, the part women played in the charity, opposition to its work and the development of local Protestant Orphan Societies. It argues that by the 1860s the parent body in Dublin had become one of the most well-respected nineteenth-century Protestant charities and an authority in the field of boarding out. The author uses individual case histories to explore the ways in which the charity shaped the orphans' lives and assisted widows, including the sister of Sean O'Casey, the renowned playwright, and identifies the prominent figures who supported its work such as Douglas Hyde, the first President of Ireland. This book makes valuable contributions to the history of child welfare, foster care, the family and the study of Irish Protestantism.

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