• Christian social thought & activity
      December 2007

      Raised by the Church

      Growing up in New York City's Catholic Orphanages

      by Edward Rohs, and Judith Estrine

    • Child care & upbringing

      Meeting Special Needs

      A Practical Guide to Support Children With Epilepsy

      by Rachel. Baker

    • Age groups: adolescents

      Pre-teen and Teenage Pregnancy

      A Twenty-first Century Reality

      by June L. Leishman

      Childhood and teenage pregnancy continues to pose significant social and health concerns within the UK and beyond. It is an issue that has implications for individuals across a range of professions and disciplines. This book is written for nurses, midwives, doctors, social workers and teachers, as well as students of sexual and reproductive health and welfare. It highlights some of the issues faced by sexually active young people and those who work with them. It will also be useful to general readers with a broad interest in the area, or the topic of particular chapters, which are structured to allow readers to 'dip into' topics as necessary. However we would encourage readers to read the book as a whole for a broader understanding of the issues. Contents include: The range and scope of early age sexual activity A child of our time Adolescent risk-taking in sexual behaviours Pharmacological contraceptive prescribing for young people Promoting sexual health in primary schools Leanne: A snapshot of teenage sexual experience Local initiatives: A sexual health doctor's experience The future's fine - or is it?

    • Children's & YA
      July 2013

      Dear Daughter

      what i wish I'd known at your age

      by Roy Sheppard

      Includes a total of over 1,500 years of female wisdom from a collection of amazing women of all ages. This book is packed with practical, 'real-world' advice on what it is to be a woman in the 21st-century. What I wish I'd known about: being a woman looking after yourself improving the relationship you have with yourself; being genuinely happy in life with self-confidence, self-esteem and a healthy attitude relationships with others (friends and frenemies) sex-from 'the first time' onwards how to understand men spotting (and avoiding) the dangerous ones what no one tells you about marriage and divorce the secret 'rules' in the workplace what the rich know about money, the poor don't.

    • Health & Personal Development
      July 2013

      Dear Son

      what I wish I'd known at your age

      by Roy Sheppard

      With contributions from dozens of fathers, this book is packed with practical, 'real-world' advice and wisdom on what it is to be a man in the 21st-century. It includes: the unexpected differences between 'real' and 'pretend' men the secret 'rules' in the workplace impress women without looking as though you're trying to what the rich know about money, the poor don't what you need to know about love, marriage and divorce build a solid personal and professional reputation improve the relationship you have with yourself; being genuinely happy in life with self confidence, self-esteem and a healthy attitude relationship building with others confident conversations spot (and avoid) truly dangerous women what it takes to be a success and how to design your preferred future.

    • History: specific events & topics

      Entangled in Yugoslavia

      An Outsiders Memoir

      by Stephanie Allen-Early

      Entangled in Yugoslavia – an Outsider’s Memoir is a compelling personal memoir as well as a portrait of a collapsing society. A Foreign Service wife returns to Belgrade – the scene of a previous posting – to find that the society she knew before as a peaceful, stable place under socialism, is caught up in political upheaval. Caught up in the psychological turmoil, she finds release while participating in the international relief effort, working for Unicef to deliver supplies to war-torn areas. The author travelled extensively in all the republics of the former Yugoslavia - both before and during the civil war. Her account of events relies on the testimonies of people coming from different national and class groups.

    • Child welfare
      February 2013

      The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in Wales

      by Jane Williams (Editor)

      This book explains the background to and effect of the law passed by the National Assembly of Wales, giving general effect to the UNCRC in the exercise of governmental powers, both in terms of furtherance of children’s rights in Wales and in terms of its implications for multi-level governance spanning the local to international laws and structures. It presents studies on several key policy areas where issues of children’s human rights are prominent, for example child poverty, special educational needs and health provision, treatment of asylum seekers and traveller communities. It also examines the key issues of accountability and civic participation, including the questions of involvement of children and young people.

    • Child welfare
      November 2015

      The cruelty man

      Child welfare, the NSPCC and the State in Ireland, 1889–1956

      by Sarah-Anne Buckley

      Recent debates surrounding children in State care, parental rights, and abuse in Ireland's industrial schools, concern issues that are rooted in the historical record. By examining the social problems addressed by philanthropists and child protection workers from the nineteenth century, we can begin to understand more about the treatment of children and the family today. In Ireland, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) was the principle organisation involved in investigating families and protecting children. The 'cruelty men', as NSPCC inspectors were known, acted as child protection workers and 'children's police'. This book looks at their history as well as the history of Ireland's industrial schools, poverty in Irish families, changing ideas around childhood and parenthood and the lives of children in Ireland from 1838 to 1970. It is a history filled with stories of real families, families often at the mercy of the State, the Catholic Church and voluntary organisations. It is a must-read for all with an interest in the Irish family and Irish childhood past and present.

    • Child welfare
      November 2015

      The cruelty man

      Child welfare, the NSPCC and the State in Ireland, 1889–1956

      by Sarah-Anne Buckley

      Recent debates surrounding children in State care, parental rights, and abuse in Ireland's industrial schools, concern issues that are rooted in the historical record. By examining the social problems addressed by philanthropists and child protection workers from the nineteenth century, we can begin to understand more about the treatment of children and the family today. In Ireland, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) was the principle organisation involved in investigating families and protecting children. The 'cruelty men', as NSPCC inspectors were known, acted as child protection workers and 'children's police'. This book looks at their history as well as the history of Ireland's industrial schools, poverty in Irish families, changing ideas around childhood and parenthood and the lives of children in Ireland from 1838 to 1970. It is a history filled with stories of real families, families often at the mercy of the State, the Catholic Church and voluntary organisations. It is a must-read for all with an interest in the Irish family and Irish childhood past and present.

    • Child welfare
      November 2013

      The cruelty man

      Child welfare, the NSPCC and the State in Ireland, 1889–1956

      by Sarah-Anne Buckley

      Recent debates surrounding children in State care, parental rights, and abuse in Ireland's industrial schools, concern issues that are rooted in the historical record. By examining the social problems addressed by philanthropists and child protection workers from the nineteenth century, we can begin to understand more about the treatment of children and the family today. In Ireland, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) was the principle organisation involved in investigating families and protecting children. The 'cruelty men', as NSPCC inspectors were known, acted as child protection workers and 'children's police'. This book looks at their history as well as the history of Ireland's industrial schools, poverty in Irish families, changing ideas around childhood and parenthood and the lives of children in Ireland from 1838 to 1970. It is a history filled with stories of real families, families often at the mercy of the State, the Catholic Church and voluntary organisations. It is a must-read for all with an interest in the Irish family and Irish childhood past and present.

    • Child welfare
      February 2017

      The cruelty man

      Child welfare, the NSPCC and the State in Ireland, 1889–1956

      by Sarah-Anne Buckley

      Recent debates surrounding children in State care, parental rights, and abuse in Ireland's industrial schools, concern issues that are rooted in the historical record. By examining the social problems addressed by philanthropists and child protection workers from the nineteenth century, we can begin to understand more about the treatment of children and the family today. In Ireland, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) was the principle organisation involved in investigating families and protecting children. The 'cruelty men', as NSPCC inspectors were known, acted as child protection workers and 'children's police'. This book looks at their history as well as the history of Ireland's industrial schools, poverty in Irish families, changing ideas around childhood and parenthood and the lives of children in Ireland from 1838 to 1970. It is a history filled with stories of real families, families often at the mercy of the State, the Catholic Church and voluntary organisations. It is a must-read for all with an interest in the Irish family and Irish childhood past and present.

    • Social issues (Children's/YA)
      September 2006

      Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in Sub-Saharan Africa

      Aspiration or Achievement of Policy

      by Author(s): Theophilus Kofi Gokah Editor(s): Theophilus Kofi Gokah

      Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in sub-Saharan Africa has come at the time when children’s well-being is on the agendas of governments, policy makers, schools and community organisations. It provides an in-depth analysis of the relation between official children’s rights and well-being policies and their implementation refracted through African as well as Western lenses. The content of the book is a departure from conventional stereotype approach to children’s well-being analysis in sub-Saharan Africa. In addressing issues around children’s rights and well-being, the book offers a reflection on the conflict between adult society and government welfare policies. The book also draws on existing knowledge about national and international efforts to change adult attitudes towards children. Analysis in the book demonstrates that there are both structural and operational problems in children’s rights and policies governing their well-being in sub-Saharan Africa. This sort of work has been neglected since the last few decades and has created a gulf between government policy rhetoric and practice. Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in sub-Saharan Africa bridges that gap and reasserts the need for effective policy, material changes in resources and cultural change valuable to enhance children’s ability to stay healthy, grow and learn to become responsible citizens.

    • Family & health
      April 2015

      Chinese Migration and Families-At-Risk

      by Editor(s): Ko Ling Chan

      Migration has played a significant role throughout Chinese history. Over the past few decades, the movements of the Chinese people, representing as they do a huge proportion of the world population, have attracted increasing attention both domestically and globally. Chinese migration is often a particularly complex phenomenon. On one hand, its characteristics have been shaped in many ways by numerous social, political and economic changes throughout the world, while, on the other, it has profound influences on the host countries and on China itself. Detailed investigation of the changing profiles of Chinese migrants, the reasons behind their movements, the challenges they face, and the strategies they use to cope with these problems will have significant implications for future policy making and practice.Chinese Migration and Families-At-Risk contributes to a better understanding of the various facets of Chinese migration. Its chapters address different concerns related to Chinese migration in the modern world, including the patterns and influences of internal migration within China; the issues related to migration from mainland China to Hong Kong, a special administrative region in China; and the history, features, and impact of Chinese migration to Western countries.Grounded in recent and contemporary research and scholarly inquiry, Chinese Migration and Families-At-Risk provides a comprehensive and critical review of the essential issues related to Chinese migrant families, and is undoubtedly a vital book for all who want to have a deeper understanding of the trends and current situation of Chinese migration.

    • Sociology & anthropology
      July 2012

      The Social Problems of Children in Sub-Saharan Africa

      by Author(s): Jerry W. Hollingsworth

      Today, in Sub-Saharan Africa, the HIV/AIDS pandemic is creating millions of AIDS orphans who languish away in orphanages that lack the resources to take care of them. Millions of other children are living on the streets, trying to survive on their own, leaving them vulnerable to unscrupulous individuals who are exploiting them for the sex tourism business, or recruiting them into hazardous labor situations that injure or maim them. Other vulnerable children are abducted into the military as child soldiers and forced to commit horrific crimes that will haunt them forever.The educational system in Sub-Saharan Africa continues to decline as resources dwindle along with education expenditures, and governments spend more money on ammunition than books. As the AIDS epidemic spreads across the continent of Africa, the numbers of professionals such as doctors, nurses, and teachers are dwindling, leaving the educational and medical communities weakened.Meanwhile, the growth and development of Africa continues to stagnate. More and more failed social polices surface from the Western world such as forced austerity measures from the IMF and the World Bank, along with the Structural Adjustment Programs that hinder further growth and prosperity on the continent.The Social Problems of Children in Sub-Saharan Africa identifies and describes the numerous problems that children in Sub-Saharan Africa are facing today. The author has lived in Ghana, West Africa, and has used an ethnographic approach in order to better understand some of the most critical problems concerning children in the poorest region on earth: Sub-Saharan Africa.

    • Adoption
      March 2015

      The Intercountry Adoption Debate

      Dialogues Across Disciplines

      by Editor(s): Robert L. Ballard, Naomi H. Goodno, Robert F. Cochran, Jay A. Milbrandt

      Meaningful discussion about intercountry adoption (the adoption of a child from one country by a family from another country) necessitates an understanding of a complex range of issues. These issues intersect at multiple levels and processes, span geographic and political boundaries, and emerge from radically different cultural beliefs and systems. The result is a myriad of benefits and costs that are both global and deeply personal in scope. This edited volume introduces this complexity and gives voice to the many sides of the intercountry adoption debate – for, against, and the ranges in between. Its 27 chapters feature a “who’s who” of intercountry adoption, including writings from top scholars in law, medicine and health, social work, anthropology, religion, sociology, and history, and perspectives from parents, policymakers, adoptees, and agency representatives. Adoption practitioners and professionals who live and breathe intercountry adoption on a daily basis offer first-hand experiences and viewpoints. A range of religious perspectives on intercountry adoption is also featured; an aspect that has not yet been explored in detail. Contributors hail from around the world, from both origin and receiving countries, and provide global and broad cultural perspectives on the topic. While the primary function of this edited volume is to present the variety of research and views on intercountry adoption, this volume is also an accessible resource and introductory “handbook” for scholars and practitioners. In setting forth the current interdisciplinary, global, and complex conversation, the book offers a starting point for a new path in intercountry adoption, one where no one is excluded from the conversation, where research and study continue to flourish, and where stronger policies will emerge that protect children, birth parents, and adoptive parents.

    • Central government policies
      September 2006

      Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in Sub-Saharan Africa

      Aspiration or Achievement of Policy

      by Author(s): Theophilus Kofi Gokah Editor(s): Theophilus Kofi Gokah

      Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in sub-Saharan Africa has come at the time when children’s well-being is on the agendas of governments, policy makers, schools and community organisations. It provides an in-depth analysis of the relation between official children’s rights and well-being policies and their implementation refracted through African as well as Western lenses. The content of the book is a departure from conventional stereotype approach to children’s well-being analysis in sub-Saharan Africa. In addressing issues around children’s rights and well-being, the book offers a reflection on the conflict between adult society and government welfare policies. The book also draws on existing knowledge about national and international efforts to change adult attitudes towards children. Analysis in the book demonstrates that there are both structural and operational problems in children’s rights and policies governing their well-being in sub-Saharan Africa. This sort of work has been neglected since the last few decades and has created a gulf between government policy rhetoric and practice. Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in sub-Saharan Africa bridges that gap and reasserts the need for effective policy, material changes in resources and cultural change valuable to enhance children’s ability to stay healthy, grow and learn to become responsible citizens.

    • Social welfare & social services
      August 2011

      Building Integrated Connections for Children, their Families and Communities

      by Editor(s): Karl Brettig and Margaret Sims

      Research and practice shows that many vulnerable children and families face more than one challenge and require more than one intervention. However our service system has evolved historically to deal with one thing at a time or to provide services from multiple sources. This lack of integration can have a devastating effect on some families where key information or warning signs are missed. Coronial and judicial inquiries constantly stress the negative impact of a ‘siloed’ approach to services.Many researchers, practitioners and policy makers have struggled to address this issue. This book has been compiled from a series of presentations given at the 2010 Children Communities Connections conference in Adelaide. Over 300 professionals from NGOs, state and federal departments and academics from all states in Australia attended and focused on three key ideas: what do we know about these families and children, what are we doing to help them and what could we do better. Papers covered a range of topics from neurobiology, to service redesign and family engagement.Here we have a snapshot of some of the most promising programs and research being undertaken in Australia. It provides a platform for starting conversations on the need to focus on the child and family in the context of their whole life, the need to cross service and professional boundaries and the need to change the way we as professionals do things to improve outcomes for families. It is a book that captures the challenges, the opportunities and the hope for the future.*Includes contributions from more than 40 practitioners, policy makers and researchers who work in community services, education and health for state, federal government and non government sectors.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      April 2010

      What About the Children! Masculinities, Sexualities and Hegemony

      by Author(s): Damien W. Riggs

      What About the Children! takes up the important task of examining the role of hegemonic masculinities in propping up a normative social order in which children are constructed as the property of adults. By examining adult-child relations in the context of a wide range of family forms and social contexts, the book provides some hard answers to questions relating to what exactly are the best interests of children, and how they should be determined. The book responds by suggesting that there is a pressing need to recognise the capacity of children to voice their own desires and needs, and that in failing to recognise this all adults (and men in particular) only serve to further perpetuate a possessive logic that, at least in part, gives rise to the mistreatment or abuse of children. Covering topics such as the experiences of foster fathers, gay adoptive fathers and sperm donors, and exploring phenomena such as books on raising boys and movies about gay parents, the book offers important insights as to the operations of hegemony in the lives of a broad range of men. Importantly, the book moves beyond simply identifying the operations of hegemony in relation to possessive investments in children, and goes on to propose a ‘non-indifferent’ approach to understanding adult-child relations that at its heart examines the operations of power that produce children as supposedly docile subjects (and only certain adults as capable of caring for them). As a result, the book makes a significant contribution to setting an alternative agenda for child protection both within Australia and internationally by asking the question ‘protection for whom?’.

    • Social services & welfare, criminology
      March 2014

      Child and Family Welfare

      by Editor(s): Patricia-Luciana Runcan, Georgeta Raţă, Mihai-Bogdan Iovu

      Welfare is a multidimensional concept characterizing the state of the individual or a group. It includes a subjective component (self-assessment) and an objective component (external assessment) of material, physical, emotional and social dimensions. Given the current changes of the socio-economical environment, this concept is assuming a prominent role in the agenda of the social sciences. Social work focuses on studying welfare in developing programs and delivering interventions with the highest potential of improving the social functionality of individuals, groups or communities. Moreover, a rights-based approach is the only guarantee we have today for the respect of human dignity and the promotion of welfare for all people, not just those exposed or marginalized. Child and Family Welfare contains 22 papers focusing on welfare from both a theoretical perspective (by discussing the roles of the social work and theology), and an empirical one (by discussing its dimensions: emotional welfare, positive functioning, life satisfaction, and social welfare). This volume is a practical tool, helping the reader to understand the factors related to child and family welfare, and addresses both the general public and professionals, such as social workers, psychologists, therapists, and researchers from the social sciences, involved in promoting children’s rights and family welfare.

    • Central government policies
      September 2006

      Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in Sub-Saharan Africa

      Aspiration or Achievement of Policy

      by Author(s): Theophilus Kofi Gokah Editor(s): Theophilus Kofi Gokah

      Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in sub-Saharan Africa has come at the time when children’s well-being is on the agendas of governments, policy makers, schools and community organisations. It provides an in-depth analysis of the relation between official children’s rights and well-being policies and their implementation refracted through African as well as Western lenses. The content of the book is a departure from conventional stereotype approach to children’s well-being analysis in sub-Saharan Africa. In addressing issues around children’s rights and well-being, the book offers a reflection on the conflict between adult society and government welfare policies. The book also draws on existing knowledge about national and international efforts to change adult attitudes towards children. Analysis in the book demonstrates that there are both structural and operational problems in children’s rights and policies governing their well-being in sub-Saharan Africa. This sort of work has been neglected since the last few decades and has created a gulf between government policy rhetoric and practice. Children on the Boundaries of Time and Space in sub-Saharan Africa bridges that gap and reasserts the need for effective policy, material changes in resources and cultural change valuable to enhance children’s ability to stay healthy, grow and learn to become responsible citizens.

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