• Psychology: emotions

      EVA

      by Jan Prins

      This book outlines the lives of the Jewish woman Eva in time for World War II, fleeing for the Nazi `s, from Germany to the Red Light District in Amsterdam, and it ends up on the fringes of society, in the Life ended. A dramatic encounter with a namesake a result both shall live. Continue with a terrible secret their whole life continues in the spirit of this secret and the cause of suffering the consequences. From different points of this drama comes to life in this novel, and has a surprisingly end ---------------- In dit boek wordt het leven geschetst van de Joodse vrouw Eva die in de tijd voor de Tweede Wereldoorlog, op de vlucht voor de Nazi`s, vanuit Duitsland op de Wallen in Amsterdam terecht komt en daar aan de zelfkant van de maatschappij, in Het Leven, beland. Een dramatische ontmoeting met een naamgenoot heeft tot gevolg dat beiden met een verschrikkelijk geheim verder moeten leven. Hun hele verdere leven blijft in het teken staan van dit geheim en ook de oorzaak daarvan ervaart de gevolgen. Vanuit verschillende invalshoeken komt dit drama in deze roman tot leven en kent een verrassend slot.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference

      West Coast Reins

      by Beverley Bassett Broad

      Book 1 of a historical saga based on a true story. How this book came to be written is a spooky story in itself. The author believes that 'an angel on her shoulder ' wrote it!

    • Children's & YA

      Fools' Gold

      by Beverley Bassett Broad

      The second book in a 4 book historical and romantic adventure Saga which covers the true story of the loss of the General Grant and her cargo of gold in the Auckland Islands in the 1860's

    • Crime & mystery
      July 2014

      The Cleansing

      by Michael Connor

    • Adventure
      July 2011

      Someone to Look Up To

      The Story of a Special Dog

      by Jean Gill

      'Nobody writes dog stories better.' Karen Charlton, author of 'The Heiress of Linn Hagh' A dog's life in the south of France. From puppyhood, Sirius the Pyrenean Mountain Dog has been trying to understand his humans and train them with kindness... How this led to their divorce he has no idea. More misunderstandings take Sirius to Death Row in an animal shelter, as a so-called dangerous dog learning survival tricks from the other inmates. During the twilight barking, he is shocked to hear his brother's voice but the bitter-sweet reunion is short-lived. Doggedly, Sirius keeps the faith. One day, his human will come. View the book trailer youtube.com/watch?v=JFPrJbqM4LU

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      July 2016

      Changing gender roles and attitudes to family formation in Ireland

      by Series edited by Rob Kitchin, Margret Fine-Davis

      Recent decades have witnessed major changes in gender roles and family patterns, as well as a falling birth rate in Ireland and the rest of Europe. While the traditional family is now being replaced in many cases by new family forms, we do not know the reasons why people are making the choices they are and whether or not these choices are leading to greater well-being. While demographic research has attempted to explain the new trends in family formation and fertility, there has been little research on people's attitudes to family formation and having children. This book presents the results of the first major study to examine people's attitudes to family formation and childbearing in Ireland. Based on a nationwide representative sample of 1,404 men and women in the childbearing age group, the study was carried out against a backdrop of changing gender role attitudes and behaviour as well as significant demographic change.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1984

      Development During Middle Childhood

      The Years From Six to Twelve

      by Panel to Review the Status of Basic Research on School-Age Children; Committee on Child Development Research and Public Policy

      For the first time, a report focuses specifically on middle childhood--a discrete, pivotal period of development. In this review of research, experts examine the physical health and cognitive development of 6- to 12-year-old children as well as their surroundings: school and home environment, ecocultural setting, and family and peer relationships.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1985

      Youth Employment and Training Programs

      The YEDPA Years

      by Charles Betsey, Robinson G. Hollister, Jr., and Mary R. Papageorgiou, Editors; Committee on Youth Employment Programs; National Research Council

      Do government-sponsored youth employment programs actually help? Between 1978 and 1981, the Youth Employment and Demonstration Projects Act (YEDPA) funded extensive programs designed to aid disadvantaged youth. The Committee on Youth Employment Programs examined the voluminous research performed by YEDPA and produced a comprehensive report and evaluation of the YEDPA efforts to assist the underprivileged. Beginning with YEDPA's inception and effective lifespan, this report goes on to analyze the data it generated, evaluate its accuracy, and draw conclusions about which YEDPA programs were effective, which were not, and why. A discussion of YEDPA strategies and their perceived value concludes the volume.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1987

      Risking the Future

      Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing, Volume II Statistical Appendices only

      by Panel on Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing, Committee on Child Development Research and Public Policy, National Research Council

      More than 1 million teenage girls in the United States become pregnant each year; nearly half give birth. Why do these young people, who are hardly more than children themselves, become parents? The statistical appendices for the report Risking the Future: Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing provide additional insight into the trends in teenage sexual behavior.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1987

      Risking the Future

      Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing, Volume II Working Papers only

      by Panel on Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing, Committee on Child Development Research and Public Policy, National Research Council

      More than 1 million teenage girls in the United States become pregnant each year; nearly half give birth. Why do these young people, who are hardly more than children themselves, become parents? The working papers for the report Risking the Future: Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing provide additional insight into the trends in and consequences of teenage sexual behavior.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      February 1987

      Risking the Future

      Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing, Volume II: Working Papers and Statistical Appendices

      by Sandra L. Hofferth and Cheryl D. Hayes, Editors; Panel on Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing, National Research Council

      More than 1 million teenage girls in the United States become pregnant each year; nearly half give birth. Why do these young people, who are hardly more than children themselves, become parents? The statistical appendices and working papers for the report Risking the Future: Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing provide additional insight into the trends in and consequences of teenage sexual behavior.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1990

      Who Cares for America's Children?

      by Cheryl D. Hayes, John L. Palmer, and Martha J. Zaslow, Editors; Panel on Child Care Policy, National Research Council

      Few issues have aroused more heated public debate than that of day care for children of working parents. Who should be responsible for providing child care--government, employers, schools, communities? What types of care are best? This volume explores the critical need for a more coherent policy on child care and offers recommendations for the actions needed to develop such a policy. Who Cares for America's Children? looks at the barriers to developing a national child care policy, evaluates the factors in child care that are most important to children's development, and examines ways of protecting children's physical well-being and fostering their development in child care settings. It also describes the "patchwork quilt" of child care services currently in use in America and the diversity of support programs available, such as referral services. Child care providers (whether government, employers, commercial for-profit, or not-for-profit), child care specialists, policymakers, researchers, and concerned parents will find this comprehensive volume an invaluable resource on child care in America.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1991

      Work and Family

      Policies for a Changing Work Force

      by Marianne A. Ferber and M. Brigid O'Farrell with La Rue Allen, Editors; Panel on Employer Policies and Working Families, National Research Council

      The United States has seen a dramatic increase in the number of dual-earner and single-adult families. This volume reviews accompanying changes in work and family structures and their effects on worker productivity and employer practices. It presents a wide range of approaches to easing the conflicts between work and family, exploring appropriate roles for business, labor, and government. Work and Family offers up-to-date information, looking at how the family and the workplace arrived at their current relationship and evaluating the quality and the cost of care for dependents in this nation. The volume describes the advantages and disadvantages of being part of a working family and takes a critical look at the range of benefits provided, including existing and proposed employer programs for families. It also presents a comparative review of family-related benefits in other countries.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1991

      Caring for America's Children

      by Anne Meadows, Editor; Panel on Child Care Policy, National Research Council

      Do child care centers and family day care homes provide quality care for the children they serve? Do parents know how to identify quality when selecting a center or family home for their children? This easy-to-read, accessible booklet provides an overview of what constitutes quality in out-of-home care. Based on the National Research Council's detailed examination of child development and child care, Who Cares for America's Children,this booklet provides practical guidance for parents, child care providers, and policymakers. It highlights what to look for in a center or family day care home, presents what researchers and experts know about the best settings for children, and suggests what characteristics of quality care are amenable to standards or regulations. Single copy, $6.50; 2-9 copies, $5.50 each; 10 or more copies, $3.75 each (no other discounts apply).

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1995

      Losing Generations

      Adolescents in High-Risk Settings

      by Panel on High-Risk Youth, National Research Council

      At least 7 million young Americans--fully one-quarter of adolescents 10 to 17 years old--may be at risk of failing to achieve productive adult lives. They use drugs, engage in unprotected sex, drop out of school, and sometimes commit crimes, effectively closing the door to their own futures. And the costs to society are enormous: school and social services are overwhelmed, and our nation faces the future with a diminished citizenry. This penetrating book argues that the problems of troubled youth cannot be separated from the settings in which those youths live--settings that have deteriorated significantly in the past two decades. A distinguished panel examines what works and what does not in the effort to support and nurture adolescents and offers models for successful programs. This volume presents an eye-opening look at what millions of the nation's youths confront every day of their lives, addressing How the decline in economic security for young working parents affects their children's life chances. How dramatic changes in household structure and the possibilities of family and community violence threaten adolescents' development. How the decline of neighborhoods robs children of a safe environment. How adolescents' health needs go unmet in the current system. Losing Generations turns the spotlight on those institutions youths need--the health care system, schools, the criminal justice, and the child welfare and foster home systems--and how they are functioning. Difficult issues are addressed with study results and insightful analyses: access of poor youths to health insurance coverage, inequities in school funding, how child welfare agencies provide for adolescents in their care, and the high percentage of young black men in the criminal justice system.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      January 1993

      Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect

      by Panel on Research on Child Abuse and Neglect, National Research Council

      The tragedy of child abuse and neglect is in the forefront of public attention. Yet, without a conceptual framework, research in this area has been highly fragmented. Understanding the broad dimensions of this crisis has suffered as a result. This new volume provides a comprehensive, integrated, child-oriented research agenda for the nation. The committee presents an overview of three major areas: oDefinitions and scope--exploring standardized classifications, analysis of incidence and prevalence trends, and more. oEtiology, consequences, treatment, and prevention--analyzing relationships between cause and effect, reviewing prevention research with a unique systems approach, looking at short- and long-term consequences of abuse, and evaluating interventions. oInfrastructure and ethics--including a review of current research efforts, ways to strengthen human resources and research tools, and guidance on sensitive ethical and legal issues. This volume will be useful to organizations involved in research, social service agencies, child advocacy groups, and researchers.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      June 1995

      The Best Intentions

      Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families

      by Sarah S. Brown and Leon Eisenberg, Editors; Committee on Unintended Pregnancy, Institute of Medicine

      Experts estimate that nearly 60 percent of all U.S. pregnancies--and 81 percent of pregnancies among adolescents--are unintended. Yet the topic of preventing these unintended pregnancies has long been treated gingerly because of personal sensitivities and public controversies, especially the angry debate over abortion. Additionally, child welfare advocates long have overlooked the connection between pregnancy planning and the improved well-being of families and communities that results when children are wanted. Now, current issues--health care and welfare reform, and the new international focus on population--are drawing attention to the consequences of unintended pregnancy. In this climate The Best Intentions offers a timely exploration of family planning issues from a distinguished panel of experts. This committee sheds much-needed light on the questions and controversies surrounding unintended pregnancy. The book offers specific recommendations to put the United States on par with other developed nations in terms of contraceptive attitudes and policies, and it considers the effectiveness of over 20 pregnancy prevention programs. The Best Intentions explores problematic definitions--"unintended" versus "unwanted" versus "mistimed"--and presents data on pregnancy rates and trends. The book also summarizes the health and social consequences of unintended pregnancies, for both men and women, and for the children they bear. Why does unintended pregnancy occur? In discussions of "reasons behind the rates," the book examines Americans' ambivalence about sexuality and the many other social, cultural, religious, and economic factors that affect our approach to contraception. The committee explores the complicated web of peer pressure, life aspirations, and notions of romance that shape an individual's decisions about sex, contraception, and pregnancy. And the book looks at such practical issues as the attitudes of doctors toward birth control and the place of contraception in both health insurance and "managed care." The Best Intentions offers frank discussion, synthesis of data, and policy recommendations on one of today's most sensitive social topics. This book will be important to policymakers, health and social service personnel, foundation executives, opinion leaders, researchers, and concerned individuals. May

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      September 1995

      Integrating Federal Statistics on Children

      Report of a Workshop

      by Committee on National Statistics and Board on Children and Families, National Research Council and Institute of Medicine

      Those who make and implement policies for children and families are seriously hampered by several features of the federal statistical system: categorical fragmentation, sampling strategies that follow adults and families rather than children, and lack of longitudinal data on children. This volume examines the adequacy of federal statistics on children and families. It includes papers on the relevant aspects of health care reform, family and community resources, interpersonal violence, the transition to school, and educational attainment and the transition to work.

    • Sociology: family & relationships
      April 1996

      Beyond the Blueprint

      Directions for Research on Head Start's Families

      by Deborah A. Phillips and Natasha J. Cabrera, Editors; Roundtable on Head Start Research/Board on Children, Youths, and Families, National Research Council and Institute of Medicine

      On its 30th anniversary, public acceptance of Head Start is high, yet understanding of its goals is low, and evaluation research is limited in quality and scope. In this book, a roundtable of representatives from government, universities, medicine, and family support agencies identifies a set of research possibilities to generate a broader understanding of the effects of Head Start on families and children. Among the important issues discussed are the ethnic and linguistic diversity of Head Start families, the social conditions of the community context, and the implications of the changing economic landscape for both families and Head Start itself.

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