• Social theory

      Inter-professional Approaches to Young Fathers

      by Jane Reeves

      With one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in Europe, young fatherhood, as a site of economic and personal adversity, has become a focus of concern in Britain during the late 1990's. However, despite this policy interest there is surprisingly little British empirical evidence to review. One of the aims of the book is to draw together contemporary research evidence, social theory and policy which may effect how practitioners, students and academics conceptualise and work with young fathers. Consequently, each chapter illustrates the points it makes using discrete evidence from that particular field. Moreover, in order to make this process more 'user friendly' each chapter provides a summary of this literature and evidence. Finally, in order to make the book come alive it draws on case studies, which are drawn, variously, from two studies conducted by the editor. Contents include: Contextualising the evidence: Young fathers, family and professional support The legislative and policy context of young fathers and their children I've got to release it: sexual health and young men A father is born: the role of the midwife in involving young fathers in the birth and early parenting of their children Safeguarding young fathers and their children The role of fathers in their children's lives Recklessness, rescue and responsibility

    • Sociology
      January 2017

      Frontiers of the Caribbean

      by Dr Philip Nanton. Series edited by Professor Gurminder K. Bhambra

      This book argues that the Caribbean frontier, usually assumed to have been eclipsed after colonial conquest, remains a powerful but unrecognized element of Caribbean island culture. Combining analytical and creative genres of writing, it explores historical and contemporary patterns of frontier change through a case study of the little-known Eastern Caribbean multi-island state of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Modern frontier traits are located in the wandering woodcutter, the squatter on government land and the mountainside ganja grower. But the frontier is also identified as part of global production that has shaped island tourism, the financial sector and patterns of migration.

    • Sociology
      January 2017

      Frontiers of the Caribbean

      by Dr Philip Nanton. Series edited by Professor Gurminder K. Bhambra

      This book argues that the Caribbean frontier, usually assumed to have been eclipsed after colonial conquest, remains a powerful but unrecognized element of Caribbean island culture. Combining analytical and creative genres of writing, it explores historical and contemporary patterns of frontier change through a case study of the little-known Eastern Caribbean multi-island state of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Modern frontier traits are located in the wandering woodcutter, the squatter on government land and the mountainside ganja grower. But the frontier is also identified as part of global production that has shaped island tourism, the financial sector and patterns of migration.

    • Sociology
      January 2017

      Frontiers of the Caribbean

      by Dr Philip Nanton. Series edited by Professor Gurminder K. Bhambra

      This book argues that the Caribbean frontier, usually assumed to have been eclipsed after colonial conquest, remains a powerful but unrecognized element of Caribbean island culture. Combining analytical and creative genres of writing, it explores historical and contemporary patterns of frontier change through a case study of the little-known Eastern Caribbean multi-island state of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Modern frontier traits are located in the wandering woodcutter, the squatter on government land and the mountainside ganja grower. But the frontier is also identified as part of global production that has shaped island tourism, the financial sector and patterns of migration.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2017

      Democratic inclusion

      Rainer Bauböck in dialogue

      by Rainer Bauböck, David Owen

      Who has a claim to be included in a democratic political community? Rainer Bauböck's lead essay splits this question into three: whose interests should be represented in democratic decisions? Whose rights ought to be protected by democratic governments? Who has a claim to citizenship and voting rights? These questions call for different responses. Democratic legitimacy requires taking into account interests negatively affected by a decision. It requires the provision of equal rights and contestation options for all subjected to the law. And it requires access to citizenship status and the vote for membership stakeholders with genuine links to a particular polity. Bauböck applies this theory to multilevel citizenship with different inclusion rules for states, municipalities and sub-national or supranational regions. The book includes commentaries by Joseph Carens, Iseult Honohan, Will Kymlicka, David Miller, David Owen and Peter Spiro and a rejoinder by Bauböck.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2017

      Democratic inclusion

      Rainer Bauböck in dialogue

      by Rainer Bauböck, David Owen

      Who has a claim to be included in a democratic political community? Rainer Bauböck's lead essay splits this question into three: whose interests should be represented in democratic decisions? Whose rights ought to be protected by democratic governments? Who has a claim to citizenship and voting rights? These questions call for different responses. Democratic legitimacy requires taking into account interests negatively affected by a decision. It requires the provision of equal rights and contestation options for all subjected to the law. And it requires access to citizenship status and the vote for membership stakeholders with genuine links to a particular polity. Bauböck applies this theory to multilevel citizenship with different inclusion rules for states, municipalities and sub-national or supranational regions. The book includes commentaries by Joseph Carens, Iseult Honohan, Will Kymlicka, David Miller, David Owen and Peter Spiro and a rejoinder by Bauböck.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2017

      Democratic inclusion

      Rainer Bauböck in dialogue

      by Rainer Bauböck, David Owen

      Who has a claim to be included in a democratic political community? Rainer Bauböck's lead essay splits this question into three: whose interests should be represented in democratic decisions? Whose rights ought to be protected by democratic governments? Who has a claim to citizenship and voting rights? These questions call for different responses. Democratic legitimacy requires taking into account interests negatively affected by a decision. It requires the provision of equal rights and contestation options for all subjected to the law. And it requires access to citizenship status and the vote for membership stakeholders with genuine links to a particular polity. Bauböck applies this theory to multilevel citizenship with different inclusion rules for states, municipalities and sub-national or supranational regions. The book includes commentaries by Joseph Carens, Iseult Honohan, Will Kymlicka, David Miller, David Owen and Peter Spiro and a rejoinder by Bauböck.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2017

      Bauman and contemporary sociology

      A critical analysis

      by Ali Rattansi

      This is the first single-authored critical engagement with the major works of Zygmunt Bauman. Where previous books on Bauman have been exegetical, here an unwavering light is shone on key themes in the sociologist's work, exposing serious weaknesses in Bauman's interpretations of the Holocaust, Western modernity, consumerism, globalisation and the nature of sociology. The book shows how Eurocentrism, the neglect of issues of gender and a lack of awareness of the racism faced by Europe's non-white ethnic minorities seriously limit Bauman's analyses of Western societies. At the same time, it points to Bauman's repeated insistence on the need for sociologists to take a moral stance in favour of the world's poor and downtrodden as being his most valuable legacy. The book will be of great interest to sociologists. Its readability will be valued by undergraduates and postgraduates and it will attract a readership well beyond the discipline.

    • Christianity
      June 2007

      The Strategic Smorgasbord of Postmodernity

      Literature and the Christian Critic

      by Editor(s): Deborah Bowen

      Contemporary Christian critique often talks about postmodernism apocalyptically, in terms of cultural crisis and decline; instead, the contributors to this volume believe that there is a new place for Christian entrées on the academic Smorgasbord of postmodernity, and they see the postmodern turn as an opportunity for fresh perspectives on the spiritual dimensions of reading literature. These twenty scholars are an eclectic group, differing in theological and theoretical commitments, but all identifying as Christian. In this collection they enter into dialogue with a wide range of contemporary literary theorists and theoretical perspectives, and offer new readings of primary texts informed by both these theoretical constructs and their Christian faith."The manuscript strikes out in important new directions in its sympathetic reading of postmodern theory from a Christian perspective, and, even more significantly, in its careful and measured dialogic approach to the relationship of Christian thought and contemporary literary theory."Daniel Coleman, Canada Research Chair in Critical Ethnicity and Race Studies, Department of English and Cultural Studies, McMaster University"Too often Christian literary critics and theologians have preemptively dismissed postmodern theory, even as secular critics have been equally dismissive about the contributions that the Christian faith tradition makes to the study of literature. This volume successfully brings these two worlds together in innovative, at times challenging, and always rich ways.I do not know of a similar volume in existence, a work that gathers in one convenient publication a wide-ranging set of discussions of contemporary literary theory by Christian scholars. The editor has gathered an impressive and important set of papers here, and I believe the volume will raise much interest and provoke a good deal of constructive debate."Susan VanZanten Gallagher, Professor of English, Director, Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development, Seattle Pacific University

    • Cultural studies
      February 2007

      American Dreams

      Dialogues in U.S. Studies

      by Editor(s): Ricardo Miguez

      The scholars included in this collection sought to indicate more contemporary working definitions for the expression "American Dream", or rather Dreams. The multidisciplinary selections come from many countries and represent scholars from different backgrounds. They reflect the current developments and approaches in the field of US Studies and we hope to help broaden the scope of programs in higher education institutions. The chapters are thematically organized in two sections: “Initial Dialogues” and “Comparative Dialogues.” The first one comprises essays that set the foundations for our discussions and intends to familiarize newcomers with the theme. The second section extends the possibilities of working comparatively with the American Dreams and a number of other interdisciplinary fields of interest for US Studies programs.

    • Philosophy
      October 2007

      The Dialectics of Late Capital and Power

      James, Balzac and Critical Theory

      by Author(s): Erik S. Roraback

      This essay offers up a provocative new theoretical tack on the topic area of the dialectic of capital, the dialectic of cruelty, and the dialectic of power and of their intricate and self-differential inter-relationships and forms of being, under late capitalism, as delineated in selected narratives of two major Occidental novelists, Henry James and his key paper friend, Honoré de Balzac; it does so from a genuinely inter-disciplinary perspective that draws from heterogeneous waves of critical theory broadly conceived, having thus something to say to contemporary culture both of general and of academic interest alike.Key concepts elucidated and fleshed out in the work for the first time in a volume-length and systematic way in the study of the humanities, in order to get the show on the road, include the theoretical notions and arguments of true power and capital as ‘un-power’, ‘non-power’, ‘un-capital’, and ‘non-capital’; other suchlike examples punctuate the essay that attempt to meet precise theoretical and practical requirements for a twenty-first century increasingly submitted to the logic of capitalist power. The present study also thus offers new ways of thinking about the enormous and age-long subject of big power and capital that would, in the final tally, want to align itself with such prophetic traditions of thought as what Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, for example, have termed ‘the New Earth’.

    • Philosophy of language
      July 2013

      The Nature of Social Reality

      by Editor(s): Claudia Stancati, Alfredo Givigliano, Emanuele Fadda and Giuseppe Cosenza

      Searle’s theory of social reality is increasingly meeting with worldwide recognition, and is undoubtedly the most prominent theory of social ontology (at least in the post-analytical tradition), even if actual research in this domain is engaged in critical confrontation with it. Searle’s approach continues to shape the debate, but his construction is more and more sharply dissected, both in its details and in its general assumptions. Furthermore, new perspectives, not rooted in the analytical tradition, are taking place, so that not only alternative answers, but alternative questions are arising.This book posits that we should approach the issue from another angle, and that we should retrace the origins of such a concept in order to gain a different, and possibly more interesting, perspective.Are we able to delineate some issues that represent what we think the next development of these core problems could be? This book proposes three possible routes. Firstly, the necessity to account for, but not to relegate the object of social ontology only inside an analysis of language in which Social Objects arise and by which they are described and put under debate. Secondly, the necessity not to consider social sciences (from law studies to sociology, from political analysis to historical and widely philosophical instances) merely as derived products of the reflections about language. Thirdly, by resuming the first two issues and synthetizing them, we can debate the number of realities in question and their natures themselves.

    • Library & information sciences
      March 2014

      Social Informatics

      Past, Present and Future

      by Editor(s): Pnina Fichman, Howard Rosenbaum

      Social Informatics: Past, Present and Future is a collection of twelve papers that provides a state-of-the-art review of 21st century social informatics. Two papers review the history of social informatics, and show that its intellectual roots can be found in the late 1970s and early ’80s and that it emerged in several different locations around the world before it coalesced in the US in the mid-1990s. The evolution of social informatics is described under four periods: foundational work, development and expansion, a robust period of coherence, and a period of diversification that continues today. Five papers provide a view of the breadth and depth of contemporary social informatics, demonstrating the diversity of theoretical and methodological approaches that can be used. A further five papers explore the future of social informatics and offer provocative and disparate visions of its trajectory, ranging from arguments for a new philosophical grounding for social informatics, to calls for a social informatics based on practice thinking and materiality.This book presents a view of SI that emphasizes the core relationship among people, ICT and organizational and social life from a perspective that integrates aspects of social theory and demonstrates clearly that social informatics has never been a more necessary research endeavor than it is now.

    • Films, cinema
      October 2010

      Wit's End

      Making Sense of the Great Movies

      by Author(s): James Combs

      This book is a study of the “Great Movies,” that fluid category of feature films deemed by various authorities—film societies, critics, academics, and movie enthusiasts—to be the enduring and memorable works of cinematic history. But what are they about? In Wit’s End, the author attempts to “make sense” of these films in order to understand their greatness in the context of their relation to other films and to the worlds they come from and recreate on screen.To that end, we employ the conceptual power of pragmatic social theory and the rich idea of aesthesis to explore and arrange these films as a means of understanding what they express about the universality of human life in our keen use of wit, organization of social wont, and direction of cultural way. It is hoped that such an inquiry will illuminate the glory of the great films and contribute to the advance of film studies.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2009

      Contours of Privacy

      by Editor(s): David Matheson

      The contours of privacy—its particular forms and our reasons for valuing it—are numerous and varied. This book explores privacy’s contours in a series of essays on such themes as the relationship between privacy and social accountability, privacy in and beyond anonymity, the psychology of privacy, and the privacy concerns of emerging information technologies.The book’s international and multidisciplinary group of contributors provides rich insights about privacy that will be of great interest not only to the scholarly privacy community at large but also to professionals, academics, and laypersons who understand that the contours of privacy weave themselves throughout wide swaths of life in present-day society.The stylistically accessible yet scholarly rigorous nature of The Contours of Privacy, along with the diversity of perspectives it offers, set it apart as one of the most important additions to the privacy literature on the contemporary scene.

    • Asian history
      February 2018

      Colonial Transformation and Asian Religions in Modern History

      by Editor(s): David W. Kim

      The localisation of a region, group, or culture was a common social phenomenon in pre-modern Asia, but global colonialism began to affect the lifestyle of local people. What was the political condition of the relationship between insiders and outsiders? The impact of colonial authorities over religious communities has not received significant attention, even though the Asian continent is the home of many religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Islam, Shintoism, and Shamanism. Colonial Transformation and Asian Religions in Modern History presents multi-angled perspectives of socio-religious transition. It uses the cultural religiosity of the Asian people as a lens through which readers can re-examine the concepts of imperialism, religious syncretism and modernisation. The contributors interpret the growth of new religions as another facet of counter-colonialism. This new approach offers significant insight into comprehending the practical agony and sorrow of regional people throughout Asian history.

    • Psychology
      February 2007

      Sociology at the Frontiers of Psychology

      by Editor(s): Gwynyth Overland

      Sociology at the Frontiers of Psychology explores the nameless ground between sociology and psychology - an Alsace-Lorraine of the social sciences where theories and perspectives are freely borrowed from one to the other. Some chapters use psychological theory for studies of sociological phenomena, others use sociological perspectives for studies of psychological phenomena. Some writers are research fellows at the beginning of their careers, others professors at the pinnacle of theirs – notably Thomas J. Scheff, distinguished author of Goffman Unbound! and Being Mentally Ill. These Scottish, Dutch, Moroccan-French, Norwegian, Canadian and North American sociologists have found inspiration in classical sociological theory from Durkheim to Foucault and produced original thinking grounded in empirical work. In addition, two psychologists and an anthropologist have contributed articles which border on the sociological field from the other side of the frontier.

    • Social & political philosophy
      January 2013

      Revolutions

      Finished and Unfinished, From Primal to Final

      by Editor(s): Paul Caringella, Wayne Cristaudo and Glenn Hughes

      Revolutions: Finished and Unfinished, From Primal to Final is an important philosophical contribution to the study of revolution. It not only makes new contributions to the study of particular revolutions, but to developing a philosophy of revolution itself. Many of the contributors have been inspired by the philosophical approaches of Eric Voegelin or Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, and the tension between these two social philosophies adds to the philosophical uniqueness and richness of the work.

    • Architecture
      December 2013

      Cities to be Tamed? Spatial Investigations across the Urban South

      by Editor(s): Francesco Chiodelli, Beatrice De Carli, Maddalena Falletti, Lina Scavuzzo

      Across the global South, the rapid urbanisation and uneven development that have occurred over the past few decades have brought to the surface a tight connection between social conflicts and urban space. Indeed, the physical conformation of urban space is one of the primary factors that trigger social tensions, with repercussions at the metropolitan, regional and national scales. Such tensions are related to the conditions of social and spatial inequality which characterise many urban areas across the South; they can also be connected to contingent political and institutional orders which find in the materiality of space both the means and the cause of conflicts among different groups, amidst diverging territorial demands and the overlapping of competing struggles for power. At the same time, new possibilities arise in the concreteness of space, including innovative forms of local activism, adapting strategies of self-organisation, and unconventional relations between the ‘formal’ and the ‘informal’ city. On acknowledging the multifaceted nature of the urban space, there arises a question which constitutes the core problem addressed by the book: are cities to be tamed?This volume gathers a series of cross-disciplinary contributions on these topics, spanning from architecture and urban design, to planning, social theory and geography. These contributions revolve around two core themes. The first concerns the agency of design in contexts of ‘informality’ and centres on the missing/unexpected/pursued exchange between projects and realities. The second concerns the complex relationship between spatial planning, politics, and conflicts in contexts characterised by marked ethnic, political, and social tensions.Contributors: Alessandro Balducci, Scott A. Bollens, Jeffrey Chan Kok Hui, Francesco Chiodelli, Laure Criqui, Viviana d’Auria, Beatrice De Carli, Bruno De Meulder, Annalies De Nijs, Maddalena Falletti, Nabeel Hamdi, Joud M.I. Khasawneh, Hamed Khosravi, Olivier Legrand, Colin Marx, Carmen Mendoza-Arroyo, Lina Scavuzzo, Erez Tzfadia, Ignacio Castillo Ulloa, Faith Wong and Oren Yiftachel.

    • Social & political philosophy
      February 2015

      The Recognition Principle

      A Philosophical Perspective between Psychology, Sociology and Politics

      by Author(s): Vinicio Busacchi

      This book responds to the need for a clearer understanding of issues related to the theme of recognition in various disciplinary fields in which it plays an important role, such as psychology, sociology and politics. The book also considers in particular detail the usefulness of a theoretical-speculative definition of the question of recognition. It also shows that no philosophy of recognition can be solidly built, or claim epistemic strength and practical-operational forcefulness, without a certain degree of psychological and anthropological excavation, without a specific ‘discourse on man’. Through an engagement with such a discourse, this book is able to explore the concept of recognition as a general principle, namely the ‘recognition principle’.

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