• History
      June 2014

      Seks, drugs en rock en roll in de gouden eeuw

      by Benjamin Roberts

      In Seks, Drugs en Rock 'n' Roll in de Gouden Eeuw (‘Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n’ Roll in the Golden Age’), historian Benjamin B. Roberts paints a fascinating portrait of the lives of young men int he first half of the seventeenth century. He describes the riotous behaviour of prominent figures such as Rembrandt – born in 1606 – and brings the values of his rebellious peers to life. Roberts convincingly demonstrates that young men rebelled then as they do now, and moved against previous generations. They grew out their hair, wore outrageous clothes, smoked, drank too much, got into fights with the city guards, cheated, and sang bawdy songs. This accessibly written book paints a vivid portrait of youth culture in the Golden Age; a time when the advent of printing allowed for a rapid spread of a culture of permissiveness. The spread of liberal ideas, together with the rising incomes, created a new generation of ‘bad boys’. Using hilarious examples, Roberts shows that deviant behaviour is timeless.

    • Romance
      October 2014

      How Angels Die: A Confession

      by Guy Blews

      If someone you love is suffering from a debilitating illness and wants to end their life and wants you to help them do it (asks you to assist with their suicide), what would you do? “How Angels Die: A Confession” will leave you with a sense of having seen the worst in life, but the best in the human spirit. The World Health Organization states that somebody dies by committing suicide every 40 seconds. Approximately 800,000 people kill themselves every year and suicide is the second leading cause of death in young people aged 15 to 29. “How Angels Die: A Confession”:When the author discovers that the love of his life has a virulent case of Multiple Sclerosis, and that she does not want to endure the suffering any longer, he is forced to consider and enact the unthinkable. Guy Blews opens up the discussion of assisted suicide in a way that encourages the reader to see it as an act of unconditional love. This emotional journey is a tour de force that deftly and courageously allows love to conquer all. “How Angels Die: A Confession” is a love story that will shake you to the core. It will, at its very essence, give you hope and open your heart. Torn between a deep understanding of what she needs and the moral dilemma of what is right, Guy was left with one choice - to support her in everything she did because he loved her more than anything. Book Foreword written by Actor, Director, Producer Randall Batinkoff. Randall Batinkoff does quadruple duty as Director, Producer, Co-Writer and Star of the movie, “37: A Final Promise.” Randall Batinkoff has worked with some of the best actors and directors in the movie industry over the past three decades.

    • Politics & government
      July 2015

      The Global Minotaur

      America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy

      by Yanis Varoufakis

      In this remarkable and provocative book, Yanis Varoufakis, former finance minister of Greece, explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a Global Minotaur was born. Today's deepening crisis in Europe is just one of the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global system which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. Going beyond this, Varoufakis reveals how we might reintroduce a modicum of reason into what has become a perniciously irrational economic order. An essential account of the socio-economic events and hidden histories that have shaped the world as we now know it

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2018

      Rationalization in Religions

      Judaism, Christianity and Islam

      by Yohanan Friedmann, Christoph Markschies

      Current tendencies in religious studies and theology show a growing interest for the interchange between religions and the cultures of rationalization surrounding them. The studies published in this volume, based on the international conferences of both the Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften and the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, aim to contribute to this field of interest by dealing with concepts and influences of rationalization in Judaism, Christianity, Islam and religion in general. In addition to taking a closer look at the immediate links in the history of tradition between those rationalizing movements and evolutions in religion, emphasis is put on intellectual-historical convergences: Therefore, the articles are led by central comparative questions, such as what factors foster/hinder rationalization?; where are criteria for rationalization drawn from?; in which institutions is rationalization taking place?; who propagates, supports and utilizes rationalization?

    • Political economy
      January 2014

      How Numbers Rule the World

      The Use and Abuse of Statistics in Global Politics

      by Lorenzo Fioramonti

      Numbers dominate global politics and, as a result, our everyday lives. Credit ratings steer financial markets and can make or break the future of entire nations. GDP drives our economies. Stock market indices flood our media and national debates. Statistical calculations define how we deal with climate change, poverty and sustainability. But what is behind these numbers? In How Numbers Rule the World, Lorenzo Fioramonti reveals the hidden agendas underpinning the use of statistics and those who control them. Most worryingly, he shows how numbers have been used as a means to reinforce the grip of markets on our social and political life, curtailing public participation and rational debate. An innovative and timely exposé of the politics, power and contestation of numbers.

    • Politics & government
      February 2013

      The Global Minotaur

      America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy

      by Yanis Varoufakis

      In this remarkable and provocative book, Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a 'Global Minotaur' was born. Just as the Athenians maintained a steady flow of tributes to the Cretan beast, so Europe and the rest of the world began sending incredible amounts of capital to America and Wall Street. Thus, the Global Minotaur became the 'engine' that pulled the world economy from the early 1980s through to the financial collapse of 2008.Today's deepening crisis in Europe is just one of the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global 'system' which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. Going beyond this, Varoufakis lays out the options available to us for reintroducing a modicum of reason into a highly irrational global economic order.An essential account of the socio-economic events and hidden histories that have shaped the world as we now know it.

    • Cultural studies
      February 2008

      Human Remains

      Medicine, Death, and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Paris

      by Jonathan Strauss

    • Sociology
      October 2007

      The Digital Condition

      Class and Culture in the Information Network

      by Rob Wilkie

    • Literary theory
      February 2008

      The Mother in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

      Psychoanalysis, Photography, Deconstruction

      by Elissa Marder

    • Cultural studies
      February 2008

      Human Remains

      Medicine, Death, and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Paris

      by Jonathan Strauss

    • Folklore, myths & legends

      The Flowering Thorn

      by Thomas Mckean

    • History

      African Americans on the Western Frontier

      by Monroe Lee Billington (Editor), Roger D. Hardaway (Editor)

      During the last half of the nineteenth century, several thousand African Americans moved to the American western frontier. Before the Civil War, some went west to California as slaves of gold miners and to Utah as slaves of Mormons. Later, free black men joined the U.S. Army and served in frontier outposts while others were hired on as cowboys on western ranches and cattle trails. Once Reconstruction ended in the South, discrimination and segregation caused more African Americans to seek better opportunities elsewhere where prejudice was less evident. The significant role played by African Americans in the settlement and development of the West has largely been ignored and neglected until now. African Americans on the Western Frontierremedies that historic neglect with fifteen essays that explore the contributions that African American men and women made to the western frontier-as miners, homesteaders, town builders, entrepreneurs, and as ordinary, civic-minded citizens. This rich and diverse story of the African American western experience during the frontier era is for scholars and students of western history as well as anyone interested in African American history, and is an important work for all Americans to read.

    • Archaeology

      Inside Ancient Kitchens

      New Directions in the Study of Daily Meals & Feasts

      by Elizabeth A Klarich

      The anthropology of food is an area of research in which economic, social, and political dynamics interact in incredibly complex ways. Using archaeological case studies from around the globe, Inside Ancient Kitchens presents new perspectives on the comparative study of prehistoric meals from Peru to the Philippines. Inside Ancient Kitchens builds upon the last decade of feasting studies and presents two unique goals for broadening the understanding of prehistoric meals. First, the volume focuses on the study of meal preparation through the analysis of temporary and permanent kitchen areas. This move to focus "behind the scenes" is aimed at determining how, where, and by whom meals were financed and prepared. Secondly, data from these preparation contexts are used to differentiate between household-level and suprahousehold-level meals in each case study, resulting in more nuanced typologies of daily meals, feasts, and other food-related events. Inside Ancient Kitchens presents an important step in the development of new methodological and theoretical approaches within the anthropology of food and will be of great interest to scholars studying the social dynamics, labour organisation, and political relationships underlying prehistoric meals.

    • Sociology: customs & traditions

      Usable Pasts

      by Tad Tuleja

    • Biography: historical, political & military

      Mormon Midwife

      The 1846-1888 Diaries of Patty Sessions

      by Donna Smart

      Volume 2, Life Writings of Frontier Women series, ed. Maureen Ursenbach Beecher Patty Session's 1847 Mormon Trail diary has been widely quoted and excerpted, but her complete diaries chronicling the first decades of Mormon settlement at Salt Lake City have never before been published. They provide a detailed record of early Mormon community life from Illinois to Utah through the eyes of Mormondom's most famous midwife. They also recount her important role in women's social networks and her contributions to community health and Utah's economy, to pioneer education and horticulture. Patty Sessions assisted at the births of humdreds of early Mormons and first-generation Utahns, meticulously recording the events. Shed had an active role in the founding of the Relief Society and health organizations. She spoke in tongues and administered spiritually as well as medically to the ill. Her diaries are a rich resource for early Mormon and Utah history.

    • Individual composers & musicians, specific bands & groups

      Out Of The Black Patch

      by Noel Carmack

    • Religion & beliefs

      Mormon Healer & Folk Poet

      Mary Susannah Fowler's Life of "Unselfish Usefulness"

      by Margaret Brady

      Mary Susannah Sumner Fackrell Fowler, 1862-1920, lived in the village of Orderville, Utah, which was named for the Mormon communitarian system practiced there. She married Henry Ammon Fowler in 1880 and moved in 1888 to Huntington, Utah. They had eight children, and Henry took a second wife, becoming a polygamist. Mary was not well known outside her community, but she led a remarkable life of selfless service. Folklorist Margaret Brady, intrigued by a photograph and part of a diary, set out to piece together who Mary Fowler was, using fragmentary materials, including Mary's diary, poetry, and essays; her husband's journals; a grandson's biography of her; records of organizations in which she was active; and oral narratives passed down through descendants. The life Brady reconstructed was shaped by shared values concerning community and by Mary's conviction of the importance of social interconnections. Mary's work as a nurse, healer, and midwife, grounded in traditional medicinal practices, extended her reach widely among her neighbors. She was an active leader in LDS Church and other organizations for women. Her folk poetry, written in culturally accepted forms, allowed her to examine, critique, and celebrate the values of her community. Brady brings to this reconstruction an eclectic, interdisciplinary approach. Drawing on reflexive ethnography, Brady emphasizes her own involvement with her subject and with the multiple discourses that, in combination, give her access to Mary Fowler's identity. She encourages her readers to collaborate in piecing together the meaning of Mary's life, reading her autobiographical texts and others in juxtaposition with Brady's understanding of that life; participating in the construction of Mary Fowler's "self" through her poetry, life writings, and community service, and thereby experiencing the interconnectedness she so prized.

    • Sociology: customs & traditions

      Welsh Courting Customs

      by Catrin. Stevens

    • History of the Americas

      A Remarkable Curiosity

      Dispatches from a New York City Journalist's 1873 Railroad Trip

      by Jerald T. Milanich

      Collected in this volume for the first time are Cummings's portraits of a land and its assortment of characters unlike anything back East. Characters like Pedro Armijo, the New Mexican sheep tycoon who took Denver by storm, and more prominently the Mormon prophet Brigham Young and one of his wives, Ann Eliza Young, who was filing for divorce at the time of Cummings's arrival.Although today he is virtually unknown, during his lifetime Cummings was one of the most famous newspapermen in the United States, in part because of stories like these. Complete with a biographical sketch and historical introduction, A Remarkable Curiosity is an enjoyable read for anybody interested in the American West in the latter half of the nineteenth century.

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