• Anthropology
      November 2019

      Morality at the Margins

      Youth, Language, and Islam in Coastal Kenya

      by Sarah Hillewaert

      Models how linguistic anthropological methods—including attention to speech acts and even gestures—can be used to provide new insights into discussions of ethical self-fashioning.

    • Anthropology
      May 2020

      Textures of the Ordinary

      Doing Anthropology after Wittgenstein

      by Veena Das

      Many humanists are now interested in what social sciences can bring to philosophy and social theory and particularly how anthropological work challenges notions of foundational views of human nature, rationality, or ontology.

    • Sociology
      April 2020

      Urban Formalism

      The Work of City Reading

      by David Faflik

      Reimagines what it means to “read” the modern city, in four interrelated case studies that provide a wide-ranging sensory tour of New York and Paris in the nineteenth century

    • Anthropology
      November 2006

      Intimacy and Italian Migration

      Gender and Domestic Lives in a Mobile World

      by Edited by Loretta Baldassar, and Donna R. Gabaccia

    • Cultural studies
      February 2008

      Human Remains

      Medicine, Death, and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Paris

      by Jonathan Strauss

    • Sociology
      October 2007

      The Digital Condition

      Class and Culture in the Information Network

      by Rob Wilkie

    • Literary theory
      February 2008

      The Mother in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

      Psychoanalysis, Photography, Deconstruction

      by Elissa Marder

    • Anthropology
      November 2006

      Ordinary Ethics

      Anthropology, Language, and Action

      by Edited by Michael Lambek

    • Cultural studies
      February 2008

      Human Remains

      Medicine, Death, and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Paris

      by Jonathan Strauss

    • Social discrimination
      October 2008

      War in Worcester

      Youth and the Apartheid State

      by Pamela Reynolds

    • Social discrimination
      October 2008

      War in Worcester

      Youth and the Apartheid State

      by Pamela Reynolds

    • Philosophy
      February 2004

      Religion

      Beyond a Concept

      by Edited by Hent de Vries

    • Anthropology
      November 2006

      Intimacy and Italian Migration

      Gender and Domestic Lives in a Mobile World

      by Edited by Loretta Baldassar, and Donna R. Gabaccia

    • Anthropology
      November 2006

      Ordinary Ethics

      Anthropology, Language, and Action

      by Edited by Michael Lambek

    • Anthropology

      Affliction

      Health, Disease, Poverty

      by Veena Das

      Affliction inaugurates a novel way of understanding the trajectories of health and disease in the context of poverty. Focusing on low-income neighborhoods in Delhi, it stitches together three different sets of issues. First, it examines the different trajectories of illness: What are the circumstances under which illness is absorbed within the normal and when does it exceed the normal—putting resources, relationships, and even one’s world into jeopardy? A second set of issues involves how different healers understand their own practices. The astonishing range of practitioners found in the local markets in the poor neighborhoods of Delhi shows how the magical and the technical are knotted together in the therapeutic experience of healers and patients. The book asks: What is expert knowledge? What is it that the practitioner knows and what does the patient know? How are these different forms of knowledge brought together in the clinical encounter, broadly defined? How does this event of everyday life bear the traces of larger policies at the national and global levels? Finally, the book interrogates the models of disease prevalence and global programming that emphasize surveillance over care and deflect attention away from the specificities of local worlds. Yet the analysis offered retains an openness to different ways of conceptualizing “what is happening” and stimulates a conversation between different disciplinary orientations to health, disease, and poverty. Most studies of health and disease focus on the encounter between patient and practitioner within the space of the clinic. This book instead privileges the networks of relations, institutions, and knowledge over which the experience of illness is dispersed. Instead of thinking of illness as an event set apart from everyday life, it shows the texture of everyday life, the political economy of neighborhoods, as well as the dark side of care. It helps us see how illness is bound by the contexts in which it occurs, while also showing how illness transcends these contexts to say something about the nature of everyday life and the making of subjects.

    • Anthropology

      Affliction

      Health, Disease, Poverty

      by Veena Das

      Affliction inaugurates a novel way of understanding the trajectories of health and disease in the context of poverty. Focusing on low-income neighborhoods in Delhi, it stitches together three different sets of issues. First, it examines the different trajectories of illness: What are the circumstances under which illness is absorbed within the normal and when does it exceed the normal—putting resources, relationships, and even one’s world into jeopardy? A second set of issues involves how different healers understand their own practices. The astonishing range of practitioners found in the local markets in the poor neighborhoods of Delhi shows how the magical and the technical are knotted together in the therapeutic experience of healers and patients. The book asks: What is expert knowledge? What is it that the practitioner knows and what does the patient know? How are these different forms of knowledge brought together in the clinical encounter, broadly defined? How does this event of everyday life bear the traces of larger policies at the national and global levels? Finally, the book interrogates the models of disease prevalence and global programming that emphasize surveillance over care and deflect attention away from the specificities of local worlds. Yet the analysis offered retains an openness to different ways of conceptualizing “what is happening” and stimulates a conversation between different disciplinary orientations to health, disease, and poverty. Most studies of health and disease focus on the encounter between patient and practitioner within the space of the clinic. This book instead privileges the networks of relations, institutions, and knowledge over which the experience of illness is dispersed. Instead of thinking of illness as an event set apart from everyday life, it shows the texture of everyday life, the political economy of neighborhoods, as well as the dark side of care. It helps us see how illness is bound by the contexts in which it occurs, while also showing how illness transcends these contexts to say something about the nature of everyday life and the making of subjects.

    • Anthropology

      Affliction

      Health, Disease, Poverty

      by Veena Das

      Affliction inaugurates a novel way of understanding the trajectories of health and disease in the context of poverty. Focusing on low-income neighborhoods in Delhi, it stitches together three different sets of issues. First, it examines the different trajectories of illness: What are the circumstances under which illness is absorbed within the normal and when does it exceed the normal—putting resources, relationships, and even one’s world into jeopardy? A second set of issues involves how different healers understand their own practices. The astonishing range of practitioners found in the local markets in the poor neighborhoods of Delhi shows how the magical and the technical are knotted together in the therapeutic experience of healers and patients. The book asks: What is expert knowledge? What is it that the practitioner knows and what does the patient know? How are these different forms of knowledge brought together in the clinical encounter, broadly defined? How does this event of everyday life bear the traces of larger policies at the national and global levels? Finally, the book interrogates the models of disease prevalence and global programming that emphasize surveillance over care and deflect attention away from the specificities of local worlds. Yet the analysis offered retains an openness to different ways of conceptualizing “what is happening” and stimulates a conversation between different disciplinary orientations to health, disease, and poverty. Most studies of health and disease focus on the encounter between patient and practitioner within the space of the clinic. This book instead privileges the networks of relations, institutions, and knowledge over which the experience of illness is dispersed. Instead of thinking of illness as an event set apart from everyday life, it shows the texture of everyday life, the political economy of neighborhoods, as well as the dark side of care. It helps us see how illness is bound by the contexts in which it occurs, while also showing how illness transcends these contexts to say something about the nature of everyday life and the making of subjects.

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