• Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2018

      Westerweel Group: Non-Conformist Resistance against Nazi-Germany

      A Joint Rescue Effort of Dutch Idealists and Dutch-German Zionists

      by Hans Schippers

      The book about the Westerweel Group tells the fascinating story about the cooperation of some ten non-conformist Dutch socialists and a group of Palestine Pioneers who mostly had arrived in the Netherlands from Germany and Austria the late thirties. With the help of Joop Westerweel, the headmaster of a Rotterdam Montessori School, they found hiding places in the Netherlands. Later on, an escape route to France via Belgium was worked out. Posing as Atlantic Wall workers, the pioneers found their way to the south of France. With the help of the Armée Juive, a French Jewish resistance organization, some 70 pioneers reached Spain at the beginning of 1944. From here they went to Palestine. Finding and maintaining the escape route cost the members of the Westerweel Group dear. With some exceptions, all members of the group were arrested by the Germans. Joop Westerweel was executed in August 1944. Other members, both in the Netherlands and France, were send to German concentration camps, where some perished.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2018

      Moses und Homer

      Griechen, Juden, Deutsche: Eine andere Geschichte der deutschen Kultur

      by Bernd Witte

      Das Buch befragt die deutsche Literatur- und Geistesgeschichte nach der Verdrängung der jüdischen Tradition und markiert die Lücken, die durch die Vertreibung der geistigen Repräsentanten des Judentums aus dem deutschen Sprachraum gerissen worden sind. Als in Deutschland gegen Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts uneingeschränkte Bewunderung für das antike Griechentum aufkam, wurde gleichzeitig das sich gerade der europäischen Aufklärung öffnende Judentum auf dem Schauplatz der Religionskritik vehement bekämpft. In diesem Kontext ist der aggressive Antijudaismus zu verstehen, mit dem sich Goethe und Schiller gegen die Sinai-Offenbarung und deren legendären Mittler Moses wandten. Beginnend mit Winckelmann hat die deutsche Klassik einen neuen Legitimationsdiskurs geschaffen, der unter Rückgriff auf den antiken Polytheismus das ‚produktive Individuum‘ und die ‚wachsende Natur‘ zu seinen zentralen Kategorien machte und damit den geltenden Monotheismus zu verdrängen suchte. Im Gegensatz dazu suchten Mendelssohn und Heine die Position einer deutsch-jüdischen Moderne zu etablieren. Das Buch verfolgt, wie der ‚Weltanschauungskampf‘ gegen den Monotheismus zum ‚völkischen‘ Antisemitismus des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts führte und in der Shoa mündete, was die Verdrängung der jüdischen Tradition aus dem kulturellen Gedächtnis der Deutschen zur Folge hatte.

    • Historical fiction
      June 2013

      Across Great Divides

      by Monique Roy

      Across Great Divides is a timeless story of the upheavals of war, the power of family, and the resiliency of human spirit. When Hitler came to power in 1933, one Jewish family refused to be destroyed and defied the Nazis only to come up against another struggle—confronting apartheid in South Africa. The novel chronicles the story of Eva and Inge, two identical twin sisters growing up in Nazi Germany. As Jews, life becomes increasingly difficult for them and their family under the Nazi regime. After witnessing the horrors of Kristallnacht, they realize they must leave their beloved homeland if they hope to survive. They travel to Antwerp, Belgium, and then on to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, chasing the diamond trade in hopes of finding work for their father, a diamond merchant. Finally, they find a home in beautiful South Africa and begin to settle down. But just as things begin to feel safe, their new home becomes caught up in it’s own battles of bigotry and hate under the National Party’s demand for an apartheid South Africa. Eva and Inge wonder if they will ever be allowed to live in peace, though they cling to the hope for a better day when there will be “an understanding of the past, compassion for all humanity, and …hope and courage to move forward across great divides.” Worldwide rights are available for this novel. I would like to sell Across Great Divides in Europe, Africa and Asia. The readership for Across Great Divides are history buffs, both female and male, and all ages, from late teens through adult.

    • Bible studies: for individual or small group study
      November 2015

      Esau, My Brother: Father of Edom and Rome

      Esau – Father of Edom and Rome - hero of Palestinian Talmud – the Yerushalmi - and Midrashic sources in the Tannaic and Amoraic period under Roman rule

      by Dr. Irit Aminoff

      For two thousand years, Jews educated in their people`s traditions, have perceived Jacob and Esau as depictions of good versus evil, truth versus falsehood, purity versus impurity, and so on. Any Jewish child over the age of three, could depict Esau as that wicked personage who pursued his brother Jacob and wanted to destroy him in his fiery hatred. Esau whose blessing was denied him, rose against his brother to whom it was transferred. Indeed, Esau, in the form of the nations among whom Israel`s exile dwell, lays in wait for Jacob to this day, though, due to Esau moral and ethical inferiority, he will never realize his schemes. * The Christian, however, at mention of Jacob and Esau, immediately envisions the figures of the Genesis account [portions: Toledot & Vayishlah] as they are depicted according to the Biblical narrative form of diametrical opposites. * Esau and Jacob, heroes of the biblical account, portrays two opposite sets of fundamental traits: basic simplicity and fairness against cunning, treachery and sophistication. Through a process they become in the writings of the sages, contradictory figures who scarcely resemble the Biblical heroes. * The purpose of this book is to delineate this alternative Esau figure, the one created by Aggadic literature, and to try and understand the motivations behind this weighty shift of perspective. This is the book of Esau – Father of Edom and Rome - hero of Palestinian Talmud – the Yerushalmi - and Midrashic sources in the Tannaic and Amoraic period under Roman rule.

    • Bible studies: for individual or small group study
      June 2015

      Amos – The Prophet of Teqo'a

      The early prophecies of Amos against the local nations

      by Dr. Refael Levin

      The prophet Amos, one of the earliest prophets whose prophecies were collated into an independent book in the Bible, lived and was active during the 8th century BC. At that time, the Israelites who lived in the southern kingdom of Judah were ruled by King Uzziah, and those in the northern kingdom of Israel were ruled by King Jeroboam, son of Joash. The early prophecies of Amos against the local nations are relevant even today, since they speak of crimes being committed in the locale nowadays. The material success of Amos’s time caused the moral corruption against which the prophet rails. The prophecies of Amos and his words to his people sound as if he is directing them to our ears. His call to fix the social injustices is relevant to the evils of our generation just as much as it was to the era of the prophet. Most of his reproach touches upon social classes, inequality, and the need to provide protection to the poor and the weak. The book Amos - The Prophet from Teko'a explains and illuminates Amos’s prophecies, his fascinating speech techniques and his messages, doing so while referencing old scholars, traditional commentators and modern biblical scholars, and suggesting many original solutions to the difficulties that rise from the text. The textual analysis and the solutions use modern logic. The author suggests that Amos’s prophecies are edited into an elegant literary structure that demonstrates a progression in the prophet’s rhetorical capabilities. On this basis, the author brings original explanations to the prophecies’ structure and meaning - explanations that solve many of the difficulties that were raised from modern Biblical scholarship. The conclusions are that the prophet Amos’s message is one of social justice only (“But let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream” Amos 5:24), that the prophecies presented to us are original and are brought in the order they were spoken. The book opens in a general overview of the era and the beliefs of the time, based also on the books of three other contemporary prophets - Hosea, Isaiah and Micah - and on Biblical, historical and archaeological sources. It goes on to explain the prophet’s words chronologically. In addition, the book discusses additional topics, such as the question of the precision of the Masoretic text; the appearance and frequency of God’s names in the Bible and the meaning behind them; the place of the earthquake as part of God’s punishment policy; the meaning of the End of Times; and more. Even though these topics are not connected directly to the prophecies of Amos, they arise while studying the Biblical text and are important for understanding it, as well as contributing to our understanding of other Biblical books. This book is meant for Biblical scholars, students, people who want to know and understand Amos’s words and his messages, and to Bible fans in general. Rafael Levin, PhD, acquired his PhD from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem in Physics. For many years he worked in research, development and management in the semiconductor industry. He served as the CEO of Tower Semiconductor LTD. Since his retirement he has been studying the Bible.

    • Bible studies: for individual or small group study
      June 2015

      Temple of Time

      Genealogy, chronology and numerology Bible Creation to the dedication of Solomon's Temple

      by Dr. Gabriel Zeldin

      Dr. Zeldin's groundbreaking research in the Torah is considered as required reading for anyone seeking a thorough understanding of this major piece of the human culture. In his first book: Bereshit Haderech – The Biblical Festivals of the Seventh Month, and based upon a new system of biblical language analysis, Dr. Zeldin succeeded in revealing and demonstrating that the fascinating earlier stage of the Biblical Festivals of the Seventh Month is imbedded in the Book of Genesis, going back to the era of the Hebrew Fathers. By doing so, Dr. Zeldin revives long forgotten stories that influence the Bible entirely, namely: The Opening Day of the Hebrew Cycle of Time and Life; the Day of Jacob's Vow and the consequences thereof; Josef as a representative of The Assif Festival and his son Menashe as a representative of the Feast of Atzereth. Disappointed at the skepticism and indifference with which his above book was received, Dr. Zeldin concluded that only by introducing a mathematical proof he can break the routine of thinking when interpreting and researching biblical studies, and thereby corroborates and validates his conclusions. As topics for his next research were chosen three recurring age data in the dynasty of central leaders in the Torah: the number of years of age till fatherhood; the years after birth of the successor and the entire life span of the father - his age at death. These data, of which logic has not been deciphered until now, are scattered in many sections of the Torah, in such manner that their numerical integrity, is tightly interwoven in the narrative range that was identified in the book Bereshit Haderch, and thus establish its correct interpretation. Indeed, in his second book: Temple of Time – biblical genealogy, chronology and numerology since the period of creation up until the dedication of Solomon's Temple, Dr. Zeldin brings mathematical proof to the integrity of the structure of the age data in the Torah and goes on to resolve, with the same method of thinking, two additional ancient questions for the study of the Torah: Logic of the dates of the Flood, and the duplicity of the data given in the Torah on the exile duration of the Children of Israel in in Egypt. Dr. Zeldin is now writing his third book of this series, which elaborates on and corroborates his unique interpretation and provides in it, among others, valid solutions of mathematical certainty in regards to contributions to the Temple of Congregation, and the total number of the Children of Israel on all their tribes, upon their Exodus from Egypt.

    • Jewish studies
      July 2013

      Anglo-Jewry since 1066

      Place, locality and memory

      by Tony Kushner

      Anglo-Jewry since 1066: Place, locality and memory is a study of the history and memory of Anglo-Jewry from medieval times to the present and is the first to explore the construction of identities, both Jewish and non-Jewish, in relation to the concept of place. The introductory chapters provide a theoretical overview focusing on the nature of local studies then moves into a chronological frame, starting with medieval Winchester, moving to early modern Portsmouth and then chapters covering the evolution of Anglo-Jewry from emancipation to the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the impact on identities resulting from the complex relationship between migration (including transmigration) and settlement of minority groups. Drawing upon a wide range of approaches, including history, cultural and literary studies, geography, Jewish and ethnic and racial studies, Kushner uses extensive sources including novels, poems, art, travel literature, autobiographical writing, official documentation, newspapers and census data. This book will appeal to scholars interested in Jewish studies and British history

    • Jewish studies
      July 2013

      Anglo-Jewry since 1066

      Place, locality and memory

      by Tony Kushner

      Anglo-Jewry since 1066: Place, locality and memory is a study of the history and memory of Anglo-Jewry from medieval times to the present and is the first to explore the construction of identities, both Jewish and non-Jewish, in relation to the concept of place. The introductory chapters provide a theoretical overview focusing on the nature of local studies then moves into a chronological frame, starting with medieval Winchester, moving to early modern Portsmouth and then chapters covering the evolution of Anglo-Jewry from emancipation to the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the impact on identities resulting from the complex relationship between migration (including transmigration) and settlement of minority groups. Drawing upon a wide range of approaches, including history, cultural and literary studies, geography, Jewish and ethnic and racial studies, Kushner uses extensive sources including novels, poems, art, travel literature, autobiographical writing, official documentation, newspapers and census data. This book will appeal to scholars interested in Jewish studies and British history

    • Jewish studies
      July 2012

      Anglo-Jewry since 1066

      Place, locality and memory

      by Tony Kushner

      Anglo-Jewry since 1066: Place, locality and memory is a study of the history and memory of Anglo-Jewry from medieval times to the present and is the first to explore the construction of identities, both Jewish and non-Jewish, in relation to the concept of place. The introductory chapters provide a theoretical overview focusing on the nature of local studies then moves into a chronological frame, starting with medieval Winchester, moving to early modern Portsmouth and then chapters covering the evolution of Anglo-Jewry from emancipation to the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the impact on identities resulting from the complex relationship between migration (including transmigration) and settlement of minority groups. Drawing upon a wide range of approaches, including history, cultural and literary studies, geography, Jewish and ethnic and racial studies, Kushner uses extensive sources including novels, poems, art, travel literature, autobiographical writing, official documentation, newspapers and census data. This book will appeal to scholars interested in Jewish studies and British history

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2016

      The United States, the Soviet Union and the Arab-Israeli conflict, 1948–67

      Superpower rivalry

      by Joseph Heller

      Israel's relations with each of the superpowers was determined by global factors. The dilemma facing Israel was how to reconcile its interests with those of the United States, having failed to do so with the Soviet Union. Moreover, throughout the cold war the United States considered Israel a burden rather than an asset and had to accommodate support for Israel with keeping the Arab states within the western orbit. Partisan policy could have dealt a mortal blow to the fundamental assumption of American global strategy. Namely that the Middle East should not be allowed to become a cold war arena. The book shows how the fledgling state of Israel had to manoeuvre between the superpowers to survive.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2016

      The United States, the Soviet Union and the Arab-Israeli conflict, 1948–67

      Superpower rivalry

      by Joseph Heller

      Israel's relations with each of the superpowers was determined by global factors. The dilemma facing Israel was how to reconcile its interests with those of the United States, having failed to do so with the Soviet Union. Moreover, throughout the cold war the United States considered Israel a burden rather than an asset and had to accommodate support for Israel with keeping the Arab states within the western orbit. Partisan policy could have dealt a mortal blow to the fundamental assumption of American global strategy. Namely that the Middle East should not be allowed to become a cold war arena. The book shows how the fledgling state of Israel had to manoeuvre between the superpowers to survive.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2011

      The Reparations Controversy

      The Jewish State and German Money in the Shadow of the Holocaust 1951-1952

      by Yaakov Sharett

      This book about the reparations issue ("Wiedergutmachung" in German; "shilumim" in Hebrew) brings together selected protocols of all debates held in the Knesset, in its Foreign Affairs and Security Committee, in the Government and in the high councils of the ruling party Mapai, regarding conducting negotiations with the West German Government. This is the first book documenting confidential protocols lately opened to the public. With the elaborate introduction by Yehiam Weitz, this book will serve as a basic textbook for an important chapter not only in Israeli and German history, but also in post-war history in general.

    • Biography: general
      December 2002

      The Search for Major Plagge

      The Nazi Who Saved Jews, Expanded Edition

      by Michael Good

    • Literary essays
      January 2006

      The Exorbitant

      Emmanuel Levinas Between Jews and Christians

      by Edited by Kevin Hart, and Michael A. Signer

    • Translation & interpretation
      November 2008

      Isaac On Jewish and Christian Altars

      Polemic and Exegesis in Rashi and the Glossa Ordinaria

      by Devorah Schoenfeld

    • Judaism
      August 2005

      Racial Fever

      Freud and the Jewish Question

      by Eliza Slavet

    • Psychoanalytical theory (Freudian psychology)
      December 2003

      On Freud's Jewish Body

      Mitigating Circumcisions

      by Jay Geller

    • Jewish studies
      October 2007

      Mornings at the Stanton Street Shul

      A Summer on the Lower East Side

      by Jonathan Boyarin

    • Local history

      Pioneers, Peddlers, and Tsadikim

      The Story of Jews in Colorado

      by Ida Libert Uchill

      First published in 1957, this is the original history of Jewish people in Colorado and is now back in print in a revised and updated edition with twenty-one new illustrations.

    • Biography: general

      Leave The Dishes In The Sink

      Adventures of an Activist in Conservative Utah

      by Alison Thorne

      Alison Thorne provides a small-town Utah perspective on the progressive social movements that in the mid to late twentieth century dramatically affected American society. A born activist, Thorne has fought for women's rights, educational reform in public schools and universities, the environment, peace, and the war on poverty. Her efforts have been all the more challenging because of the conservative social and cultural environment in which she has undertaken them. Yet, Thorne, who has deep personal and familial roots in the politically conservative and predominantly Mormon culture of Utah and much of the West, has worked well with people with varied political and social perspectives and agendas. She has been able to establish effective coalitions in contexts that seem inherently hostile. She demonstrated this through her election to the local school board and through her appointment by both Republican and Democratic governors, eventually as chair, to the statewide Governor's Committee on the Status of Women. Alison Thorne's background prepared her to challenge restrictive social contexts, see the broader picture, and encourage progressive change. Educated in the field of consumption economics, which studies those aspects of consumption that operate outside the market system, especially government services and unpaid household production, primarily by women, she received a Ph.D. in economics after graduate study at the University of Chicago and Iowa State, a first for a woman at the latter. Moving with her husband after he was hired at Utah State University, she soon discovered that her education and abilities were undervalued and that tight nepotism rules kept her out of an academic position. She devoted herself to research and writing about alternatives to the narrow definitions of a housewife's role and duties prevalent in the 1940s and 1950s. Both her scholarly work and her personal inclinations prepared her for the emergence of the second wave of feminism in the 1960s. Her participation in the fight for the Equal Rights Amendment honed her skills as an activist, which she applied to multiple other causes. But Alison Thorne's style has never been mere protest of injustice; she has always been fully engaged with her communities, directly working for social change and betterment. Rather than be discouraged by initial rejection, she found ways to contribute to education on the USU campus, eventually achieved academic standing, and helped create women's studies programs and a women's center. She met other challenges in her city and state similarly, by taking her gloves off, reaching out to others, building coalitions, and getting to work.

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