• Music
      August 2014

      My Father The Godfather

      by Daryl Brown

      “My Father The Godfather” is a history changing book, but most importantly Daryl Brown will set the record straight about his dad, James Brown, The Godfather of Soul! Stories that have NEVER been told such as: Did you know that James Brown, The Godfather of Soul was offered over ten million dollars to convert to a certain religion? Daryl Brown believes that his dad…James Brown, his brother-in-law and his older brother Teddy were murdered. Susie Brown did not abandon James Brown as the movie “Get on Up” would have you believe. The relationship turned deadly with a murder attempt. Leaving the child was the only way to preserve both lives. Black police officer Donald Danner believes James Brown was shot at by white police officers because of the color of his skin. 23 shots fired at the truck. Two shots hit the gas-tank in an effort to “lawfully” murder James Brown. Tomi Rae was stopped by police for being married to a black monkey and the police told her they were going to kill James Brown. Overt racism and threat of “disappearing” or murder was a challenge for both Tomi Rae and Adrienne “James Brown’s 2 wives.” The Inner Circle will include but not limited to: the Mistress, the Limo Driver, the Widow, the Bodyguard, Band Members, Personal Physician, an Arresting Officer and many more! James Brown, The Godfather of Soul may be the most misunderstood man in the last century. His contributions toward modern music pale in comparison to the role he played in modern history. Brown lifted all races toward the ideals of equality and opportunity. Tragically, while he had the ability to calm the storms of social turmoil - his personal life was a perpetual tempest; sex, drugs, rhythm & blues. “My Father The Godfather” brings together, for the first time, Brown’s inner circle. They will correct the distortions of the past and provide the reader a clear understanding of the brilliance and generosity that was James Brown. This book will have you question your assumptions about politics, religion, sports, money and the entire entertainment industry. You will see inside the man. You will never be the same. The name, James Brown is an international Brand. His music is still being sold in over 110 countries. His face is certainly one of the most recognizable in the world. He is loved and adored by millions, but how many people really knew him?

    • Children's & YA
      November 2015

      Chocolate Mixer

      by Jason Armstrong

      While making her favorite snack with her Daddy, little Sofia makes an amazing discovery about herself! Her realization changes the way she sees this colorful world. Filled with wonder and questions, Sofia journeys into a world that isn’t just black or white, but a beautiful rainbow of colors. This book is the story of a little girl learning that she is Multiracial. “Chocolate Mixer” addresses the common questions our children may ask about a world filled with different cultures, skin-colors and ways of life, and how even our own parents can look so different from one another.

    • Ethnic studies
      December 2018

      Alegal

      Biopolitics and the Unintelligibility of Okinawan Life

      by Shimabuku, Annmaria M.

      Okinawan life, at the crossroads of American militarism and Japanese capitalism, embodies a fundamental contradiction to the myth of the monoethnic state. Suspended in a state of exception, Okinawa has never been an official colony of the Japanese empire or the United States, nor has it ever been treated as an equal part of Japan. As a result, Okinawans live amid one of the densest concentrations of U.S. military bases in the world. By bringing Foucauldian biopolitics into conversation with Japanese Marxian theory, Alegal uncovers Japan’s determination to protect its middle class from the racialized sexual contact around its mainland bases by displacing them onto Okinawa, while simultaneously upholding Okinawa as a symbol of the infringement of Japanese sovereignty. This symbolism, however, has provoked ambivalence within Okinawa. In base towns that facilitated encounters between G.I.s and Okinawan women, the racial politics of the United States collided with the postcolonial politics of the Asia Pacific. Through close readings of poetry, reportage, film, and memoir on base-town life since 1945, Shimabuku traces a continuing failure to “become Japanese.” What she discerns instead is a complex politics surrounding sex work, tipping with volatility along the razor’s edge between insurgency and collaboration. At stake in sovereign powers’ attempt to secure Okinawa as a military fortress was the need to contain alegality itself—that is, a life force irreducible to the legal order. If biopolitics is the state’s attempt to monopolize life, then Alegal is a story about how borderland actors reclaimed its power for themselves.

    • Ethnic studies
      November 2018

      Under Representation

      The Racial Regime of Aesthetics

      by Lloyd, David

      Under Representation shows how the founding texts of aesthetic philosophy ground the racial order of the modern world in our concepts of universality, freedom, and humanity. Late Enlightenment discourse on aesthetic experience proposes a decisive account of the conditions of possibility for universal human subjecthood. The aesthetic forges a powerful “racial regime of representation” whose genealogy runs from Enlightenment thinkers like Kant and Schiller to late Modernist critics like Adorno and Benjamin. For aesthetic philosophy, representation is not just about depiction of diverse humans or inclusion in political or cultural institutions. It is an activity that undergirds the various spheres of human practice and theory, from the most fundamental acts of perception and reflection to the relation of the subject to the political, the economic, and the social. Representation regulates the distribution of racial identifications along a developmental trajectory: The racialized remain “under representation,” on the threshold of humanity and not yet capable of freedom and civility as aesthetic thought defines those attributes. To ignore the aesthetic is thus to overlook its continuing force in the formation of the racial and political structures down to the present. Both a genealogy and an account of our present, Under Representation ultimately helps show how a political reading of aesthetics can help us build a racial politics adequate for the problems we face today, one that stakes claims more radical than multicultural demands for representation.

    • Historical fiction
      June 2013

      Across Great Divides

      by Monique Roy

      Across Great Divides is a timeless story of the upheavals of war, the power of family, and the resiliency of human spirit. When Hitler came to power in 1933, one Jewish family refused to be destroyed and defied the Nazis only to come up against another struggle—confronting apartheid in South Africa. The novel chronicles the story of Eva and Inge, two identical twin sisters growing up in Nazi Germany. As Jews, life becomes increasingly difficult for them and their family under the Nazi regime. After witnessing the horrors of Kristallnacht, they realize they must leave their beloved homeland if they hope to survive. They travel to Antwerp, Belgium, and then on to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, chasing the diamond trade in hopes of finding work for their father, a diamond merchant. Finally, they find a home in beautiful South Africa and begin to settle down. But just as things begin to feel safe, their new home becomes caught up in it’s own battles of bigotry and hate under the National Party’s demand for an apartheid South Africa. Eva and Inge wonder if they will ever be allowed to live in peace, though they cling to the hope for a better day when there will be “an understanding of the past, compassion for all humanity, and …hope and courage to move forward across great divides.” Worldwide rights are available for this novel. I would like to sell Across Great Divides in Europe, Africa and Asia. The readership for Across Great Divides are history buffs, both female and male, and all ages, from late teens through adult.

    • Memoirs
      March 2012

      Dancing Through History

      In Search of the Stories That Define Canada

      by Lori Henry

      In Dancing Through History, Henry crosses Canada's vast physical and ethnic terrain to uncover how its various cultures have evolved through their dances. Her coast-to-coast journey takes her to Haida Gwaii in British Columbia, where she witnesses the seldom seen animist dances of the islands' First Nation people. In the Arctic, Henry partakes in Inuit drum dancing, kept alive by a new generation of Nunavut youth. And in CapeBreton, she uncovers the ancient "step dance" of the once culturally oppressed Gaels of Nova Scotia. During her travels, Henry discovers that dance helps to break down barriers and encourage cooperation between people with a history of injustice. Dance, she finds, can provide key insight into what people value most as a culture, which is often more similar than it seems. It is this kind of understanding that goes beyond our divisive histories and gives us compassion for one another. Unique to this book, Dancing Through History includes first person interviews with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (Canada's Aboriginal groups) talking about their traditions and the effect colonisation has had on them, all through the lens of dance. Their voices are given ample space to speak for themselves – what is revealed is a beautiful worldview and many lessons to be learned in order to have a healthy planet and tolerant people as we move into the future. Book Details: This is an adult non-fiction book of Canadian content. The target market is curious travellers and those interested in culture beyond the typical tourist traps. Sales have ranged from junior high schools to retired baby boomers. Interested publishers can make an offer directly on the profile page to buy available rights.

    • Hispanic & Latino studies
      July 2012

      Remaking Brazil

      Contested National Identites in Contemporary Brazilian Cinema

      by Tatiana Signorelli Heise (Author)

      This volume examines Brazilian films released between 1995 and 2010, with special attention to issues of race, ethnicity and national identity. Focusing on the idea of the nation as an ‘imagined community’, the author discuss the various ways in which dominant ideas about brasilidade (Brazilian national consciousness) are dramatised, supported or attacked in contemporary fiction and documentary films.

    • Social & cultural history
      October 2000

      Freedom's First Generation

      Black Hampton, Virginia, 1861-1890

      by Robert F. Engs

      In this age of affirmative action and increasing complexity in black-white relations, this pioneering study of Hampton, Virginia, tells the story of what race relations in postbellum America "might have been." Here, if only for a time, the promises of Emancipation and Reconstruction were fulfilled. Why was the American Dream realized by blacks in Hampton and not elsewhere? Engs follows a community of freedmen over a thirty-year period to answer this compelling question.

    • Biography: general
      March 2001

      Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free

      Memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman and POW

      by Alexander Jefferson, with Lewis H. Carlson

      This book is a rare and important gift. One of the few memoirs of combat in World War II by a distinguished African-American flier, it is also perhaps the only account of the African-American experience in a German prison camp. Alexander Jefferson was one of 32 Tuskegee Airmen from the 332nd Fighter Group to be shot down defending a country that considered them to be second-class citizens. A Detroit native, Jefferson enlisted in 1942, trained at Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, became a second lieutenant in 1943, and joined one of the most decorated fighting units in the War, flying P51s with their legendary - and feared - "red tails." Based in Italy, Jefferson flew bomber escort missions over southern Europe before being shot down in France in 1944. Captured, he spent the balance of the war in Luftwaffe prison camps in Sagan and Moosberg, Germany. In this vividly detailed, deeply personal book, Jefferson writes as a genuine American hero and patriot. It's an unvarnished look at life behind barbed wire - and what it meant to be an African-American pilot in enemy hands.;It's also a look at race and democracy in America through the eyes of a patriot who fought to protect the promise of freedom. The book features the sketches, drawings, and other illustrations Jefferson created during his nine months as a "kriegie" (POW) and Lewis Carlson's authoritative background to the man, his unit, and the fight Alexander Jefferson fought so well.

    • Manufacturing industries
      April 2000

      A Coat of Many Colors

      Immigration, Globalization, and Reform in New York City's Garment Industry

      by Edited by Daniel Soyer, Preface by Ruth Abram

      For more than a century and a half - from the middle of the 19th century to the end of the 20th - the garment industry was the largest manufacturing industry in New York City, and New York made more clothes than anywhere else. For generations, the industry employed more New Yorkers than any other and was central to the city's history, culture, and identity. Today, although no longer the big heart of industrial New York, the needle trades are still an important part of the city's economy - especially for the new waves of immigrants who cut, sew, and assemble clothing in shops around the five boroughs. In this valuable book, historians, sociologists, and economists explore the rise and fall of the garment industry and its impact on New York and its people, as part of a global process of economic change. Essays trace the rise of the industry, from the creation of a Manhattan garment district employing immigrants from nearby tenements to the contemporary spread of Chinese-owned shops in cheaper neighborhoods.;The tumultuous history of workers and their bosses is the focus of chapters on contractors and labor militants and on the experiences of Italian, Chinese, Jewish, Dominican, and other ethnic workers. The final chapter looks at fair labor, social responsibility, and the political economy of the offshore garment industry.

    • Cultural studies
      November 2006

      Italian Folk

      Vernacular Culture in Italian-American Lives

      by Edited by Joseph Sciorra

    • Social discrimination
      October 2008

      War in Worcester

      Youth and the Apartheid State

      by Pamela Reynolds

    • Social discrimination
      October 2008

      War in Worcester

      Youth and the Apartheid State

      by Pamela Reynolds

    • Manufacturing industries
      April 2000

      A Coat of Many Colors

      Immigration, Globalization, and Reform in New York City's Garment Industry

      by Edited by Daniel Soyer, Preface by Ruth Abram

      For more than a century and a half - from the middle of the 19th century to the end of the 20th - the garment industry was the largest manufacturing industry in New York City, and New York made more clothes than anywhere else. For generations, the industry employed more New Yorkers than any other and was central to the city's history, culture, and identity. Today, although no longer the big heart of industrial New York, the needle trades are still an important part of the city's economy - especially for the new waves of immigrants who cut, sew, and assemble clothing in shops around the five boroughs. In this valuable book, historians, sociologists, and economists explore the rise and fall of the garment industry and its impact on New York and its people, as part of a global process of economic change. Essays trace the rise of the industry, from the creation of a Manhattan garment district employing immigrants from nearby tenements to the contemporary spread of Chinese-owned shops in cheaper neighborhoods.;The tumultuous history of workers and their bosses is the focus of chapters on contractors and labor militants and on the experiences of Italian, Chinese, Jewish, Dominican, and other ethnic workers. The final chapter looks at fair labor, social responsibility, and the political economy of the offshore garment industry.

    • Literary studies: general
      December 2005

      Encarnacion

      Illness and Body Politics in Chicana Feminist Literature

      by Suzanne Bost

    • Religious issues & debates
      October 2007

      Decolonizing Epistemologies

      Latina/o Theology and Philosophy

      by Edited by Ada María Isasi-Díaz, and Eduardo Mendieta

    • Archaeology by period / region

      Aztec Ceremonial Landscape

      by William L. Fash (Foreword), David Carrasco (Author, Editor)

      Contents: Notes on the Oldest Structure of El Tempo Mayor at Tenochtitlan; A Study of Skeletal Materials from Tlatelolco; Discovery of a Painted Mural at Tlatelolco; The Mt. Tlaloc Project; The Sacrifice of Tezcatlipoca -- To Change Place; Mapping the Ritual Landscape -- Debt Payment to Tlaloc During the Month of Atlcahualo; The Sacred Landscape of Aztec Calendar Festivals -- Myth, Nature and Society; Migration Histories as Ritual Performance; The Myth of the Half-Man Who Descended from the Sky; The Octli Cult in Late Pre-Hispanic Central Mexico; Dryness Before the Rains -- Taxcatl and Tezcatlipoca; Reflection on the Miraculous Waters of Tenochtitlan; Vamos a Rezar a San Marcos -- A Tlapanec Pilgrimage; Eating Landscape -- Human Sacrifice and Sustenance in Aztec Mexico; Religious Rationalisation and the Conversions of the Nahuas -- Social Organisation and Colonial Epistemology; Remnants of the Shaman.

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