• Music
      August 2014

      My Father The Godfather

      by Daryl Brown

      “My Father The Godfather” is a history changing book, but most importantly Daryl Brown will set the record straight about his dad, James Brown, The Godfather of Soul! Stories that have NEVER been told such as: Did you know that James Brown, The Godfather of Soul was offered over ten million dollars to convert to a certain religion? Daryl Brown believes that his dad…James Brown, his brother-in-law and his older brother Teddy were murdered. Susie Brown did not abandon James Brown as the movie “Get on Up” would have you believe. The relationship turned deadly with a murder attempt. Leaving the child was the only way to preserve both lives. Black police officer Donald Danner believes James Brown was shot at by white police officers because of the color of his skin. 23 shots fired at the truck. Two shots hit the gas-tank in an effort to “lawfully” murder James Brown. Tomi Rae was stopped by police for being married to a black monkey and the police told her they were going to kill James Brown. Overt racism and threat of “disappearing” or murder was a challenge for both Tomi Rae and Adrienne “James Brown’s 2 wives.” The Inner Circle will include but not limited to: the Mistress, the Limo Driver, the Widow, the Bodyguard, Band Members, Personal Physician, an Arresting Officer and many more! James Brown, The Godfather of Soul may be the most misunderstood man in the last century. His contributions toward modern music pale in comparison to the role he played in modern history. Brown lifted all races toward the ideals of equality and opportunity. Tragically, while he had the ability to calm the storms of social turmoil - his personal life was a perpetual tempest; sex, drugs, rhythm & blues. “My Father The Godfather” brings together, for the first time, Brown’s inner circle. They will correct the distortions of the past and provide the reader a clear understanding of the brilliance and generosity that was James Brown. This book will have you question your assumptions about politics, religion, sports, money and the entire entertainment industry. You will see inside the man. You will never be the same. The name, James Brown is an international Brand. His music is still being sold in over 110 countries. His face is certainly one of the most recognizable in the world. He is loved and adored by millions, but how many people really knew him?

    • Children's & YA
      November 2015

      Chocolate Mixer

      by Jason Armstrong

      While making her favorite snack with her Daddy, little Sofia makes an amazing discovery about herself! Her realization changes the way she sees this colorful world. Filled with wonder and questions, Sofia journeys into a world that isn’t just black or white, but a beautiful rainbow of colors. This book is the story of a little girl learning that she is Multiracial. “Chocolate Mixer” addresses the common questions our children may ask about a world filled with different cultures, skin-colors and ways of life, and how even our own parents can look so different from one another.

    • Historical fiction
      June 2013

      Across Great Divides

      by Monique Roy

      Across Great Divides is a timeless story of the upheavals of war, the power of family, and the resiliency of human spirit. When Hitler came to power in 1933, one Jewish family refused to be destroyed and defied the Nazis only to come up against another struggle—confronting apartheid in South Africa. The novel chronicles the story of Eva and Inge, two identical twin sisters growing up in Nazi Germany. As Jews, life becomes increasingly difficult for them and their family under the Nazi regime. After witnessing the horrors of Kristallnacht, they realize they must leave their beloved homeland if they hope to survive. They travel to Antwerp, Belgium, and then on to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, chasing the diamond trade in hopes of finding work for their father, a diamond merchant. Finally, they find a home in beautiful South Africa and begin to settle down. But just as things begin to feel safe, their new home becomes caught up in it’s own battles of bigotry and hate under the National Party’s demand for an apartheid South Africa. Eva and Inge wonder if they will ever be allowed to live in peace, though they cling to the hope for a better day when there will be “an understanding of the past, compassion for all humanity, and …hope and courage to move forward across great divides.” Worldwide rights are available for this novel. I would like to sell Across Great Divides in Europe, Africa and Asia. The readership for Across Great Divides are history buffs, both female and male, and all ages, from late teens through adult.

    • Memoirs
      March 2012

      Dancing Through History

      In Search of the Stories That Define Canada

      by Lori Henry

      In Dancing Through History, Henry crosses Canada's vast physical and ethnic terrain to uncover how its various cultures have evolved through their dances. Her coast-to-coast journey takes her to Haida Gwaii in British Columbia, where she witnesses the seldom seen animist dances of the islands' First Nation people. In the Arctic, Henry partakes in Inuit drum dancing, kept alive by a new generation of Nunavut youth. And in CapeBreton, she uncovers the ancient "step dance" of the once culturally oppressed Gaels of Nova Scotia. During her travels, Henry discovers that dance helps to break down barriers and encourage cooperation between people with a history of injustice. Dance, she finds, can provide key insight into what people value most as a culture, which is often more similar than it seems. It is this kind of understanding that goes beyond our divisive histories and gives us compassion for one another. Unique to this book, Dancing Through History includes first person interviews with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (Canada's Aboriginal groups) talking about their traditions and the effect colonisation has had on them, all through the lens of dance. Their voices are given ample space to speak for themselves – what is revealed is a beautiful worldview and many lessons to be learned in order to have a healthy planet and tolerant people as we move into the future. Book Details: This is an adult non-fiction book of Canadian content. The target market is curious travellers and those interested in culture beyond the typical tourist traps. Sales have ranged from junior high schools to retired baby boomers. Interested publishers can make an offer directly on the profile page to buy available rights.

    • Biography & True Stories
      March 2015

      American Authors Unplugged

      Interviews about Books

      by Martha Cinader

      Representative of modern American Literature, the conversations with authors in this book are evenly divided between men and women who bring to life the experiences of natives, immigrants, slaves and rebels. As a whole, they address the enduring themes of freedom and the pursuit of happiness. Following is a list of the authors interviewed. For further information about the interviews please refer to the supporting document. Rudolfo Anaya - Zia Summer Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni - Sister of My Heart Russel Banks - Cloudsplitter Nora Okja Keller - Comfort Woman Dr. Leonard Shlain - The Alphabet Versus the Goddess Barbara Chase-Riboud - The President's Daughter A.A. Carr - Eye Killers Lan Cao - Monkey Bridge Hal Sirowitz - My Therapist Said Kate Horsley - Crazy Woman Dennis McFarland - A Face at the Window

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      September 2015

      Who Can Afford to Improvise?

      James Baldwin and Black Music, the Lyric and the Listeners

      by Ed Pavlić

      More than a quarter-century after his death, James Baldwin remains an unparalleled figure in American literature and African American cultural politics. In Who Can Afford to Improvise? Ed Pavlić offers an unconventional, lyrical, and accessible meditation on the life, writings, and legacy of James Baldwin and their relationship to the lyric tradition in black music, from gospel and blues to jazz and R&B. Based on unprecedented access to private correspondence and unpublished manuscripts and attuned to a musically inclined poet’s skill in close listening, Who Can Afford to Improvise? frames a new narrative of James Baldwin’s work and life. The route retraces the full arc of Baldwin’s passage across the pages and stages of his career according to his constant interactions with black musical styles, recordings, and musicians. Who Can Afford to Improvise? is presented in three books—or movements; the first listens to Baldwin, in the initial months of his most intense visibility in May 1963 and the publication of The Fire Next Time. It introduces the key terms of his lyrical aesthetic and identifies the shifting contours of Baldwin’s career from his early work as a reviewer for left-leaning journals in the 1940s to his last published and unpublished works from the mid-1980s. Book II listens with Baldwin and ruminates on the recorded performances of Billie Holiday and Dinah Washington, singers whose messages and methods were closely related to his developing worldview. It concludes with the first detailed account of “The Hallelujah Chorus,” a performance from July 1, 1973, in which Baldwin shared the stage at Carnegie Hall with Ray Charles. Finally, in Book III, Pavlić reverses our musically inflected reconsideration of Baldwin’s voice, projecting it into the contemporary moment and reading its impact on everything from the music of Amy Winehouse, to the street performances of Turf Feinz, and the fire of racial oppression and militarization against black Americans in the twenty-first century. Always with an ear close to the music, and avoiding the safe box of celebration, Who Can Afford to Improvise? enables a new kind of “lyrical travel” with the instructive clarity and the open-ended mystery Baldwin’s work invokes into the world.

    • Dance & other performing arts
      February 2012

      Indigenous Dance & Dancing Indian

      Contested Representation in the Global Era

      by Matthew Krystal

      Book & CD. Focusing on the enactment of identity in dance, Indigenous Dance and Dancing Indian is a cross-cultural, cross-ethnic, and cross-national comparison of indigenous dance practices. Considering four genres of dance in which indigenous people are represented -- K'iche Maya traditional dance, powwow, folkloric dance, and dancing sports mascots -- the book addresses both the ideational and behavioural dimensions of identity. Each dance is examined as a unique cultural expression in individual chapters, and then all are compared in the conclusion, where striking parallels and important divergences are revealed. Ultimately, Krystal describes how dancers and audiences work to construct and consume satisfying and meaningful identities through dance by either challenging social inequality or reinforcing the present social order. Detailed ethnographic work, thorough case studies, and an insightful narrative voice make this a substantial addition to scholarly literature on dance in the Americas. It will be of interest to scholars of Native American studies, social sciences, and performing arts.

    • Management of land & natural resources

      Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century

      American Capitalism & Tribal Natural Resources

      by Donald L Fixico

      This new edition is updated through the first decade of the twenty-first century and contains a new chapter challenging Americans' Indian and non-Indian -- to begin healing the earth. This analysis of the struggle to protect not only natural resources but also a way of life serves as an indispensable tool for students or anyone interested in Native American history and current government policy with regard to Indian lands or the environment.

    • Children's & YA
      2011

      Brave Music of a Distant Drum

      by Manu Herbstein

      Brave Music of a Distant Drum by Manu Herbstein Published by Red Deer Press, Canada and Techmate, Ghana From the back cover: Ama is a slave. She is old and dying and has an incredible story to tell. It is about violence and heartache, but it is also a story of courage, hope, determination, and ultimately, love. Since Ama is blind, she cannot write down her story for future generations. Instead, she summons the son from whom she has been long separated. At first he thinks she's old and tiresome. But as Ama's astonishing journey unfolds in her own words, his world changes forever, until he can never see it with the same eyes again. Nor will those who read Ama's story.

    • African history
      January 2013

      Black Egyptians

      The African Origins of Ancient Egypt

      by Segun Magbagbeola

    • History: specific events & topics

      Entangled in Yugoslavia

      An Outsiders Memoir

      by Stephanie Allen-Early

      Entangled in Yugoslavia – an Outsider’s Memoir is a compelling personal memoir as well as a portrait of a collapsing society. A Foreign Service wife returns to Belgrade – the scene of a previous posting – to find that the society she knew before as a peaceful, stable place under socialism, is caught up in political upheaval. Caught up in the psychological turmoil, she finds release while participating in the international relief effort, working for Unicef to deliver supplies to war-torn areas. The author travelled extensively in all the republics of the former Yugoslavia - both before and during the civil war. Her account of events relies on the testimonies of people coming from different national and class groups.

    • Political correctness
      November 2014

      That's Racist

      How the Regulation of Speech and Thought Divides Us All

      by Hart, Adrian, A01

      This book suggests that modern day anti-racism can be argued as having taken over from old-fashioned racism as the dominant racialising force in British society.

    • Indigenous peoples
      May 2012

      Decolonizing Methodologies

      Research and Indigenous Peoples

      by Linda Tuhiwai Smith

      To the colonized, the term 'research' is conflated with European colonialism; the ways in which academic research has been implicated in the throes of imperialism remains a painful memory. This essential volume explores intersections of imperialism and research - specifically, the ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and tradition as 'regimes of truth.' Concepts such as 'discovery' and 'claiming' are discussed and an argument presented that the decolonization of research methods will help to reclaim control over indigenous ways of knowing and being. Now in its eagerly awaited second edition, this bestselling book has been substantially revised, with new case-studies and examples and important additions on new indigenous literature, the role of research in indigenous struggles for social justice, which brings this essential volume urgently up-to-date.

    • Ethnic minorities & multicultural studies
      January 2015

      Class, ethnicity and religion in the Bengali East End

      A political history

      by Sarah Glynn

      This exploration of one of the most concentrated immigrant communities in Britain combines a fascinating narrative history, an original theoretical analysis of the evolving relationship between progressive left politics and ethnic minorities, and an incisive critique of political multiculturalism. It recounts and analyses the experiences of many of those who took part in over six decades of political history that range over secular nationalism, trade unionism, black radicalism, mainstream local politics, Islamism and the rise and fall of the Respect Coalition. Through this Bengali case study and examples from wider immigrant politics, it traces the development and adoption of the concepts of popular frontism, revolutionary stages theory and identity politics. It demonstrates how these theories and tactics have cut across class-based organisation and acted as an impediment to addressing socio-economic inequality; and it argues for a left materialist alternative. It will appeal equally to sociologists, political activists and local historians.

    • Ethnic minorities & multicultural studies
      January 2015

      Class, ethnicity and religion in the Bengali East End

      A political history

      by Sarah Glynn

      This exploration of one of the most concentrated immigrant communities in Britain combines a fascinating narrative history, an original theoretical analysis of the evolving relationship between progressive left politics and ethnic minorities, and an incisive critique of political multiculturalism. It recounts and analyses the experiences of many of those who took part in over six decades of political history that range over secular nationalism, trade unionism, black radicalism, mainstream local politics, Islamism and the rise and fall of the Respect Coalition. Through this Bengali case study and examples from wider immigrant politics, it traces the development and adoption of the concepts of popular frontism, revolutionary stages theory and identity politics. It demonstrates how these theories and tactics have cut across class-based organisation and acted as an impediment to addressing socio-economic inequality; and it argues for a left materialist alternative. It will appeal equally to sociologists, political activists and local historians.

    • Ethnic minorities & multicultural studies
      January 2015

      Class, ethnicity and religion in the Bengali East End

      A political history

      by Sarah Glynn

      This exploration of one of the most concentrated immigrant communities in Britain combines a fascinating narrative history, an original theoretical analysis of the evolving relationship between progressive left politics and ethnic minorities, and an incisive critique of political multiculturalism. It recounts and analyses the experiences of many of those who took part in over six decades of political history that range over secular nationalism, trade unionism, black radicalism, mainstream local politics, Islamism and the rise and fall of the Respect Coalition. Through this Bengali case study and examples from wider immigrant politics, it traces the development and adoption of the concepts of popular frontism, revolutionary stages theory and identity politics. It demonstrates how these theories and tactics have cut across class-based organisation and acted as an impediment to addressing socio-economic inequality; and it argues for a left materialist alternative. It will appeal equally to sociologists, political activists and local historians.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2014

      Class, ethnicity and religion in the Bengali East End

      A political history

      by Sarah Glynn

      This exploration of one of the most concentrated immigrant communities in Britain combines a fascinating narrative history, an original theoretical analysis of the evolving relationship between progressive left politics and ethnic minorities, and an incisive critique of political multiculturalism. It recounts and analyses the experiences of many of those who took part in over six decades of political history that range over secular nationalism, trade unionism, black radicalism, mainstream local politics, Islamism and the rise and fall of the Respect Coalition. Through this Bengali case study and examples from wider immigrant politics, it traces the development and adoption of the concepts of popular frontism, revolutionary stages theory and identity politics. It demonstrates how these theories and tactics have cut across class-based organisation and acted as an impediment to addressing socio-economic inequality; and it argues for a left materialist alternative. It will appeal equally to sociologists, political activists and local historians. ;

    • International human rights law
      July 2013

      Indigenous peoples and human rights

      by Thornberry

    • International human rights law
      July 2013

      Indigenous peoples and human rights

      by Thornberry

    • International human rights law
      July 2012

      Indigenous peoples and human rights

      by Thornberry

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