• Feminism & feminist theory
      June 2014

      Girl Trouble

      Panic and Progress in the History of Young Women

      by Carol Dyhouse

      Girls behave badly. If they're not obscenity-shouting, pint-swigging ladettes, they're narcissistic, living dolls floating around in a cloud of self-obsession, far too busy twerking to care. And this is news. In this witty and wonderful book, Carol Dyhouse shows that where there's a social scandal or a wave of moral outrage, you can bet a girl is to blame. Whether it be stories of 'brazen flappers' staying out and up all night in the 1920s, inappropriate places for Mars bars in the 1960s or Courtney Love's mere existence in the 1990s, bad girls have been a mass-media staple for more than a century. And yet, despite the continued obsession with their perceived faults and blatant disobedience, girls are infinitely better off today than they were a century ago. This is the story of the challenges and opportunities faced by young women growing up in the swirl of the twentieth century, and the pop-hysteria that continues to accompany their progress.

    • Crime & mystery
      July 2014

      The Cleansing

      by Michael Connor

    • Gender studies, gender groups
      August 2010

      Gendering Border Studies

      by Jane Aaron (Editor), Henrice Altink (Editor), Chris Weedon (Editor)

      The study of borders has recently undergone significant transitions, reflecting changes in the functions of boundaries themselves, as the world political map has experienced transformations. Gender (defined as the knowledge about perceived distinctions between the sexes) is an important signifier of borders as constructed and contested lines of differences. In the interplay with other categories of difference, such as class, race, ethnicity and religion, it plays a major role in giving meaning to different forms of borders. It is not surprising, then, that an increasing number of studies in the last years have aimed for a gendering of border studies. This book aims to explore this new interdisciplinary field and develop it further. The main questions it asks are: how do we define ‘borders’, ‘frontiers’ and ‘boundaries’ in different disciplinary approaches of gendered border studies? What were and are the main fields of gendered border studies? What might be important questions for future research? And how useful is an inter- or transdisciplinary approach for gendered border studies? Fifteen established scholars from various disciplines contribute chapters in which they set out how the issue of gender and borders has been approached in their discipline and describe what they expect from future research. After a detailed introduction presenting these issues, the book is divided into four sections: migration and gender; gendered narratives of border crossing; gender and the drawing of internal boundaries, and teaching gendered borders.

    • Gender studies: women
      February 2011

      Our Mother's Land

      Chapters in Welsh Women's History, 1830-1939

      by Angela John (Editor)

      This volume marks the twentieth anniversary of the first publication of this groundbreaking book. It reflects the pioneering research of its contributors to the development of modern Welsh women’s history. The eight chapters range widely across time (1830-1939) and place, from exploring working class women’s community sanctions and the perils facing collier’s wife to the very different lifestyles of ironmasters’ wives. They also tackle the idealised images of respectable Welsh women in periodicals and the tragic reality of those who took their own lives as well as showing us the transgressive actions of suffrage rebels. They examine how women carved out space within movements such as temperance and track the fluctuating fortunes of women’s employment and domestic life from the Great War to the eve of the Second World War. This volume makes available once more a book that has become a classic in its field and a vital part of the historiography of modern Wales. This expanded edition also brings us up to date. It reveals the research and publications of the last two decades and comments upon the extent to which Wales has moved beyond being the familiar ‘land of our fathers’. Written in a lively and accessible style, it nevertheless draws upon a wealth of research and expertise and should appeal to both the academic community and to a much wider readership.

    • Gender studies: women
      February 2011

      Mothers, Wives and Changing Lives

      Women in Mid-Twentieth Century Rural Wales

      by Sally Baker (Author), B J Brown (Author),

    • Gender studies: women
      November 2012

      Women's Writing and Muslim Societies

      The Search for Dialogue, 1920-present

      by Sharif Gemie (Author)

      Women’s Writing and Muslim Societies looks at the rise in works concerning Muslim societies by both western and Muslim women – from pioneering female travellers like Freya Stark and Edith Wharton in the early twentieth century, whose accounts of the Orient were usually playful and humorous, to the present day and such works as Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran and Betty Mahmoody’s Not Without My Daughter, which present a radically different view of Muslim Societies marked by fear, hostility and even disgust. The author, Sharif Gemie, also considers a new range of female Muslim writers whose works suggest a variety of other perspectives that speak of difficult journeys, the problems of integration, identity crises and the changing nature of Muslim cultures; in the process, this volume examines varied journeys across cultural, political and religious borders, discussing the problems faced by female travellers, the problems of trans-cultural romances and the difficulties of constructing dialogue between enemy camps.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      Women's Writing and Muslim Societies

      The Search for Dialogue, 1920-present

      by Sharif Gemie (Author)

      Women’s Writing and Muslim Societies looks at the rise in works concerning Muslim societies by both western and Muslim women – from pioneering female travellers like Freya Stark and Edith Wharton in the early twentieth century, whose accounts of the Orient were usually playful and humorous, to the present day and such works as Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran and Betty Mahmoody’s Not Without My Daughter, which present a radically different view of Muslim Societies marked by fear, hostility and even disgust. The author, Sharif Gemie, also considers a new range of female Muslim writers whose works suggest a variety of other perspectives that speak of difficult journeys, the problems of integration, identity crises and the changing nature of Muslim cultures; in the process, this volume examines varied journeys across cultural, political and religious borders, discussing the problems faced by female travellers, the problems of trans-cultural romances and the difficulties of constructing dialogue between enemy camps.

    • Gender studies: women
      June 2014

      Dwy Gymraes, Dwy Gymru

      Hanes Bywyd a Gwaith Gwyneth Vaughan a Sara Maria Saunders

      by Rosanne Reeves (Author)

      Cyflwyniad o fywyd a gwaith dwy awdur benywaidd o gefn gwlad Cymru yn ail hanner y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg a geir yn y llyfr hwn. Mae’n torri tir newydd yn hanes llenyddiaeth y Gymraes gan nad oes ymchwil manwl wedi ei wneud cyn hyn ar Gwyneth Vaughan a Sara Maria Saunders, dwy a bontiodd y bwlch rhwng yr awduresau petrusgar a ddenwyd allan o’u hogofâu gan Granogwen, golygydd y Frythones (1879–89), a’r rhai a ddaeth ar eu hôl yn yr ugeinfed ganrif. Dyma ychwanegiad gwerthfawr at yr amryw gyfrolau ac erthyglau sydd wedi ymddangos ers yr 1980au ar gyfraniad hollbwysig y Gymraes at ddiwylliant ei chenedl. Mae’n lyfr delfrydol i unrhyw un sy’n ymddiddori yn hanes a llenyddiaeth y Gymraes yn ail hanner y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg, gan dorri tir newydd yn hanes llenyddiaeth y Gymraes a chyfoethogi ein dealltwriaeth o awduron benywaidd anghofiedig y Gymru Gymraeg.

    • Gender studies: women
      July 2014

      Y Llawes Goch a’r Faneg Wen

      Y Corff Benywaidd a’i Symbolaeth mewn Ffuglen Gymraeg gan Fenywod

      by Mair Rees (Author)

      Mae’r gyfrol hon yn gofyn ‘sut mae awduron benywaidd wedi ymdrin â’u profiadau corfforol mwyaf dwys a phersonol yn ei ffuglen Cymraeg ?’ Defnyddia bersbectif ffeministaidd i ystyried potensial y corff benywaidd fel cyfrwng symbolaidd i fynegi syniadau ehangach am ein diwylliant. Ceir trafodaeth eang a deallus sydd yn rhychwantu sawl cenhedlaeth o awduron, o Dyddgu Owen a Kate Bosse-Griffiths yn y pumdegau hyd at awduron cyfoes megis Bethan Gwanas a Caryl Lewis.

    • Gender studies, gender groups
      September 2013

      Poetry, geography, gender

      Women rewriting contemporary Wales

      by Alice Entwistle (Author)

      Poetry, Geography, Gender explores literary and geographical analysis, cultural criticism and gender politics in the work of such well-known literary figures as Gwyneth Lewis, Menna Elfyn, Christine Evans and Gillian Clarke, alongside newer names like Zoë Skoulding and Samantha Wynne-Rhydderch. Drawing on her unpublished interviews with many of the featured poets, Alice Entwistle examines how and why their various senses of affiliation with a shared cultural hinterland should encourage us to rethink the relationship between nation, identity and literary aesthetics in post-devolution Wales. This series of lively and detailed close readings reveals how writers use the textual terrain of the poem, both literally and metaphorically, to register and script aesthetic as well as geo-political and cultural-historical change. As an innovative critical study, this volume thus takes particular interest in the ways in which author, text and territory help to inform and produce each other in the culturally complex and confident small nation that is twenty-first-century Wales.

    • Human rights
      April 2001

      Women Witnessing Terror

      Testimony and the Cultural Politics of Human Rights

      by Anne Cubilie

      A model of engaged scholarship, this book examines first-person testimonials by women who have survived abuse and atrocity in zones of conflict and terror. Drawing on a wide range of sources and settings, including genocide, state terror, ethnic cleansing, and war, Anne Cubilie uses survivor testimony as theoretical invention, placing personal witness in dialogue with work by philosophers, literary theorists, and others who study the space between victim and survivor, ethical witness and silenced observer, male and female. This nuanced example of ethical criticism demonstrates forcefully how ethical witnessing - listening to the voices of survivors - reformulates the language of human rights and enhances its ability to intervene against violence and oppression.

    • Literary studies: general
      December 2005

      Encarnacion

      Illness and Body Politics in Chicana Feminist Literature

      by Suzanne Bost

    • Autobiography: general
      May 2008

      Hidden

      Reflections on Gay Life, AIDS, and Spiritual Desire

      by Richard Giannone

    • Films, cinema

      Reversing the Lens

      Ethnicity, Race, Gender, & Sexuality Through Film

      by Jun Xing (Editor) , Lane R Hirabayashi (Editor)

      This book brings together noted scholars in history, anthropology, sociology, ethnic studies and film studies to promote film as a powerful classroom tool that can be used to foster cross-cultural communication with respect to race and ethnicity. Through such films as: Skin Deep; Slaying the Dragon; and Mississippi Masala; contributors demonstrate why and how visual media help delineate various forms of critical visual thinking and examine how radicalisation is either sedimented or contested in the popular imagination. Not limited to classroom use, the book is relevant to anyone who is curious about how video and film can be utilised to expose race as a social construction that -- in dialogue with other potential forms of difference -- is subject to political contestation.

    • Social welfare & social services

      A Roof Over My Head

      Homeless Women and the Shelter Industry

      by Jean Calterone Williams

      Based upon extensive ethnographic data, 'A Roof Over My Head' examines the lives of homeless women who often care for children and live in small shelters and transitional living centres. Previous literature on homelessness has focused on those living literally on the streets or in large armoury-style shelters.As William maintains, such studies often overlook those homeless women -- many with children -- who live in small shelters and transitional living centres. The author draws upon interviews with homeless women, interviews with housed people, and, finally, evaluations of shelter services, philosophies, and policies to get at the causes and social construction of homelessness.'A Roof Over My Head' is a ground-breaking study that unveils the centrality of abuse and poverty in homeless women's lives and outlines ways in which societal responses can and should be more effective.

    • Political ideologies

      Wives, Mothers, and the Red Menace

      Conservative Women and the Crusade Against Communism

      by Mary Brennan

      Mary Brennan examines conservative women's anti-communist activism in the years immediately after World War II. She describes the Cold War context in which these women functioned and the ways in which women saw communism as a very real danger to domestic security and American families. From writing letters and hosting teas to publishing books and running for political office, they campaigned against communism and, incidentally, discovered the power they had to effect change through activism. Brennan reveals how the willingness of these deeply conservative women to leave the domestic sphere and engage publicly in politics evinces the depth of America's postwar fear of communism. She further argues that these conservative, anti-communist women pushed the boundaries of traditional gender roles and challenged assumptions about women as political players by entering political life to publicly promote their ideals.

    • Biography: general

      Alaska's Daughter

      An Eskimo Memoir of the 20th Century

      by Elizabeth Pinson

      Elizabeth B. Pinson shares with us her memories of Alaska's emergence into a new and modern era, bearing witness to history in the early twentieth century as she recalls it. She draws us into her world as a young girl of mixed ethnicity, with a mother whose Eskimo family had resided on the Seward Peninsula for generations and a father of German heritage. Growing up in and near the tiny village of Teller on the Bering Strait, Elizabeth at the age of six, despite a harrowing, long midwinter sled ride to rescue her, lost both her legs to frostbite when her grandparents, with whom she was spending the winter in their traditional Eskimo home, died in the 1918 influenza epidemic. Fitted with artificial legs financed by an eastern benefactor, Elizabeth kept journals of her struggles, triumphs, and adventures, recording her impressions of the changing world around her and experiences with the motley characters she met. These included Roald Amundsen, whose dirigible landed in Teller after crossing the Arctic Circle; the ill-fated 1921 British colonists of Wrangel Island in the Arctic; trading ship captains and crews; prospectors; doomed aviators; and native reindeer herders. Elizabeth moved on to boarding school, marriage, and the state of Washington, where she compiled her records into this memoir and where, now in her 90s, she lives.

    • Biography: general

      Helen Foster Snow

      An American Woman in Revolutionary China

      by Kelly Ann Long

      Helen Foster Snow: An American Woman in Revolutionary China tells the story of a remarkable woman born in rural Utah in 1907, who lived in China during the 1930's and became an important author, a lifelong humanitarian, and a bridge-builder between the United States and China. As Kelly Ann Long recounts in this engaging biography, Helen Foster Snow immersed herself in the social and political currents of a nation in turmoil. After marrying renowned journalist Edgar Snow, she developed her own writing talents and offered an important perspective on emerging events in China as that nation was wracked by Japanese invasion, the outbreak of World War II, and a continuing civil war. She supported the December Ninth Movement of 1935, broke boundaries to enter communist Yenan in 1937, and helped initiate the "gung ho" Chinese Industrial Co-operative movement. Helen Foster Snow wrote about the people and events in China's remote communist territories during an important era. She relayed detailed portraits of female communist leaders and famous figures such as Mao Zedong and Zhu De, as well as common people struggling to survive in a period of increasing turmoil. Her informed, compassionate depictions built a bridge linking American interest to the welfare of the Chinese. Long's account recovers the story of a controversial and important commentator on a critical period in U.S.-China relations and in Chinese history.

    • Religion & beliefs

      History Of Louisa Barnes Pratt

      The Autobiography of a Mormon Missionary Widow and Pioneer

      by ed. S. George Ellsworth

      Volume 3, Life Writings of Frontier Women series, ed. Maureen Ursenbach Beecher In her memoir, and 1870s revision of her journal and diary, Louisa Barnes Pratt tells of childhood in Massachusetts and Canada during the War of 1812, and independent career as a teacher and seamstress in New England, and her marriage to the Boston seaman Addison Pratt. Converting to the LDS Church, the Pratts moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, from where Brigham Young sent Addison on the first of the long missions to the Society Islands that would leave Louisa on her own. As a sole available parent, she hauled her children west to Winter Quarters, to Utah in 1848, to California, and, in Addison's wake, to Tahiti in 1850. The Pratts joined the Mormon colony at San Bernardino, California. When in 1858 a federal army's march on Utah led to the colonists' recall, Addision—alienated from the Mormon Church after long absences—chose not to go. Mostly separated thereafter (Addison died in 1872), Louisa settled in Beaver, Utah, where she campaigned for women's rights, contributed to the Woman's Exponent, and depended on her own means, as she had much of her life, until her death in 1880.

    • Biography: historical, political & military

      Mormon Midwife

      The 1846-1888 Diaries of Patty Sessions

      by Donna Smart

      Volume 2, Life Writings of Frontier Women series, ed. Maureen Ursenbach Beecher Patty Session's 1847 Mormon Trail diary has been widely quoted and excerpted, but her complete diaries chronicling the first decades of Mormon settlement at Salt Lake City have never before been published. They provide a detailed record of early Mormon community life from Illinois to Utah through the eyes of Mormondom's most famous midwife. They also recount her important role in women's social networks and her contributions to community health and Utah's economy, to pioneer education and horticulture. Patty Sessions assisted at the births of humdreds of early Mormons and first-generation Utahns, meticulously recording the events. Shed had an active role in the founding of the Relief Society and health organizations. She spoke in tongues and administered spiritually as well as medically to the ill. Her diaries are a rich resource for early Mormon and Utah history.

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