• Fiction
      April 2015

      I Blame Morrissey

      My Adventures with Indie-Pop and Emotional Disaster

      by Jamie Jones

      You wouldn't let song lyrics rule your life would you? You wouldn't become so infatuated with a pop star that you would use their words to make decisions on your relationships would you? Jay would. Join him as he tries to grow up in the 90s in a haze of lust, indie-pop & warm lager while all the time looking to Morrissey for guidance.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2019

      A Little Gay History of Wales

      by Daryl Leeworthy

      A Little Gay History of Wales tells the compelling story of Welsh LGBT life from the Middle Ages to the present day. Drawing on a rich array of archival sources from across Britain, together with oral testimony and material culture, this pioneering study is the first to examine the experiences of ordinary LGBT men and women, and how they embarked on coming out, coming together and changing the world. This is the story of poets who wrote about same-sex love and translators who worked to create a language to describe it; activists who campaigned for equality and politicians who created the legislation providing it; teenagers ringing advice lines for guidance on coming out, and revellers in the pioneering bars and clubs on a Friday and Saturday night. It is also a study of prejudice and of intolerance, of emigration and isolation, of HIV/AIDS and Section 28 – all features of the complex historical reality of LGBT life and same-sex desire. Engaging and accessible, absorbing and perceptive, this book is an important advance in our understanding of Welsh history.

    • Popular culture
      April 2014

      100 Ideas that Changed Street Style

      by Josh Sims

      100 Ideas that Changed Street Style is a look-by-look dissection of the key ideas that changed the way we dress – from the middle of the 20th century to the present day – explaining the most iconic items of clothing and how they were worn, what the look was born of, its cultural background, how it was received and how it still resonates in fashion today. The modern wardrobe owes its development not just to fashion designers in Paris or Milan but also to gangs and movements brought together by a shared appreciation of music, sport or a particular underground culture, and a certain style that defines membership. These styles have rocked establishments, created stereotypes, expressed social division as much as they have united people, entered the language, spread around the world and, above all, transformed dress for a wider public.

    • Popular culture
      July 2015

      Experimental British television

      by Martin Hargreaves

      Throughout its history, British television has found a place, if only in its margins, for programmes that consciously worked to expand the boundaries of television aesthetics. Even in the present climate of increased academic interest in television history, its experimental tradition has generally either been approached generically or been lost within the assumption that television is simply a mass medium. Avaible for the first time in paperback, Experimental British television uncovers the history of experimental television, bringing back forgotten programmes in addition to looking at relatively more privileged artists or programme strands from fresh perspectives. The book therefore goes against the grain of dominant television studies, which tends to place the medium within the flow of the 'everyday', in order to scrutinise those productions that attempted to make more serious interventions within the medium.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2015

      Experimental British television

      by Laura Mulvey, Martin Hargreaves, Jamie Sexton

      Throughout its history, British television has found a place, if only in its margins, for programmes that consciously worked to expand the boundaries of television aesthetics. Even in the present climate of increased academic interest in television history, its experimental tradition has generally either been approached generically or been lost within the assumption that television is simply a mass medium. Avaible for the first time in paperback, Experimental British television uncovers the history of experimental television, bringing back forgotten programmes in addition to looking at relatively more privileged artists or programme strands from fresh perspectives. The book therefore goes against the grain of dominant television studies, which tends to place the medium within the flow of the 'everyday', in order to scrutinise those productions that attempted to make more serious interventions within the medium. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2001

      Film editing - history, theory and practice

      Looking at the invisible

      by Don Fairservice

      The first-ever comprehensive examination of the film editor's craft from the beginning of cinema to the present day. Of all the film-making crafts, editing is the least understood. Using examples drawn from classic film texts, this book clarifies the editor's role and explains how the editing process maximises the effectiveness of the filmed material. Traces the development of editing from the primitive forms of early cinema through the upheavals caused by the advent of sound, to explore the challenges to convention that began in the 1960s and which continue into the twenty-first century. New digital technologies and the dominance of the moving image as an increasingly central part of everyday life have produced a radical rewriting of the rules of audio-visual address. It is not a technical treatise; instructive and accessible, this historically-based insight into filmmaking practice will prove invaluable to students of film and also appeal to a much wider readership. ;

    • Popular culture
      May 2013

      Imagining the popular in contemporary French culture

      by Edited by Diana Holmes and David Looseley

      This groundbreaking book is about what 'popular culture' means in France, and how the term's shifting meanings have been negotiated and contested. It represents the first theoretically informed study of the way that popular culture is lived, imagined, fought over and negotiated in modern and contemporary France. It covers a wide range of overarching concerns: the roles of state policy, the market, political ideologies, changing social contexts and new technologies in the construction of the popular. But it also provides a set of specific case studies showing how popular songs, stories, films, TV programmes and language styles have become indispensable elements of 'culture' in France. Deploying yet also rethinking a 'Cultural Studies' approach to the popular, the book therefore challenges dominant views of what French culture really means today.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      Imagining the popular in contemporary French culture

      by Diana Holmes, David Looseley

      This groundbreaking book is about what 'popular culture' means in France, and how the term's shifting meanings have been negotiated and contested. It represents the first theoretically informed study of the way that popular culture is lived, imagined, fought over and negotiated in modern and contemporary France. It covers a wide range of overarching concerns: the roles of state policy, the market, political ideologies, changing social contexts and new technologies in the construction of the popular. But it also provides a set of specific case studies showing how popular songs, stories, films, TV programmes and language styles have become indispensable elements of 'culture' in France. Deploying yet also rethinking a 'Cultural Studies' approach to the popular, the book therefore challenges dominant views of what French culture really means today. ;

    • Popular culture
      November 2007

      Public issue television

      World in Action' 1963–98

      by Peter Goddard, John Corner, Kay Richardson

      Public issue television is a major contribution to understanding the relationship between television, politics and society. Based on full access to the archives, it offers a fascinating historical account of how one television series, Granada's World in Action, celebrated for its tough journalism, visual directness and public impact, functioned and developed over its run across 35 years between 1963 and 1998. In a succession of chapters looking at different periods in the series' development and at key dimensions of its distinctive identity, it gets deep inside the making of factual television and examines how a particular culture of production works within broader conditions of possibility and constraint. In particular, it charts the interwoven processes of change - technological, professional, aesthetic, institutional, economic, social and political. As well as discussing achievement and success, it examines the tensions, the debates and open conflicts that formed part of the context within which the series was made and transmitted across four decades.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2007

      Public issue television

      World in Action' 1963–98

      by Peter Goddard, John Corner, Kay Richardson

      Public issue television is a major contribution to understanding the relationship between television, politics and society. Based on full access to the archives, it offers a fascinating historical account of how one television series, Granada's World in Action, celebrated for its tough journalism, visual directness and public impact, functioned and developed over its run across 35 years between 1963 and 1998. In a succession of chapters looking at different periods in the series' development and at key dimensions of its distinctive identity, it gets deep inside the making of factual television and examines how a particular culture of production works within broader conditions of possibility and constraint. In particular, it charts the interwoven processes of change - technological, professional, aesthetic, institutional, economic, social and political. As well as discussing achievement and success, it examines the tensions, the debates and open conflicts that formed part of the context within which the series was made and transmitted across four decades. ;

    • Rock & Pop music
      April 2008

      Hits

      Philosophy in the Jukebox

      by Peter Szendy, Translated by Will Bishop

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism
      May 2008

      Loaded Words

      by Marjorie Garber

    • Rock & Pop music
      April 2008

      Hits

      Philosophy in the Jukebox

      by Peter Szendy, Translated by Will Bishop

    • Sociology & anthropology

      The Road to Southend Pier

      One Man's Struggle Against the Surveillance Society

      by Ross Clark

      A chance encounter with a talking lamp-post got Ross Clark thinking: is there any escape from Britain's growing surveillance society? He set himself a challenge: could he get to Southend without Big Brother knowing where he had gone? In this entertaining and highly revealing account of his attempt to dodge Britain's 4.2 million CCTV cameras and other forms of surveillance, Ross Clark lays bare the astonishing amount of data which is kept on us by the state and by commercial organisations, and asks whom should we fear most: the government agencies who are spying on us - or the criminals who seem to prosper in the swirling fog of excessive data-collection.Among his discoveries are:- An information company in Nottingham seemed to know he has cherry trees in his garden.- If he flies to New York, the FBI will keep a record of what he had for lunch.- 2,700 people are wrongly recorded as criminals on Britain's Police National Computer.- 70 Americans have been implanted with microchips to help identify them if they become lost and confused.- British companies are routinely vetting potential employees by searching MySpace for evidence of drunken antics and sexual perversion.- It will take 905 man-years to issue every British citizen with an ID card.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      December 2011

      Sharing

      Culture and the Economy in the Internet Age

      by Phillipe Aigrain

      In the past fifteen years, file sharing of digital cultural works between individuals has been at the center of a number of debates on the future of culture itself. To some, sharing constitutes piracy, to be fought against and eradicated. Others see it as unavoidable, and table proposals to compensate for its harmful effects. Meanwhile, little progress has been made towards addressing the real challenges facing culture in a digital world. Sharing is Legitimate An in-depth exploration of digital culture and its dissemination, Sharing: Culture and the Economy in the Internet Age offers a counterpoint to the dominant view that file sharing is piracy, analyzing it rather as the modern form of long recognized rights to share in culture. Sharing starts from a radically different viewpoint, namely that the non-market sharing of digital works is both legitimate and useful. Philippe Aigrain looks at the benefits of file sharing, which allows unknown writers and artists to be appreciated more easily. It supports this premise with empirical research, demonstrating that non-market sharing leads to more diversity in the attention given to various works. New Business Models Concentrating not only on the cultural enrichment caused by widely shared digital media, Sharing also discusses new financing models that would allow works to be shared freely by individuals without aim at profit. Aigrain carefully balances the needs to support and reward creative activity with a suitable respect for the cultural common good and proposes a new interpretation of the digital landscape.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism
      May 2008

      Loaded Words

      by Marjorie Garber

    • Humour

      You Like That, Don't You?

      by Kelvin Nel

      A DELICIOUSLY DARK COMEDY Acclaimed Fifty-year old Broadway and Hollywood writer, Gavin De Jong, has returned to his old English coastal hometown resort of Southend-on-Sea, under a cloud of suspicion and scandal. De Jong’s life has everything one would expect from a man of his position: drama, travel, sex, laughter, media interest – even a touch of intrigue. But this was his life almost thirty years ago. Before he even became famous. During 1984, apart the minor issue of being associated with five deaths, young cinema projectionist, Gavin De Jong – a football mad, soul, funk and film buff – experiences an otherwise average year in Southend. Roll up; roll up for this seaside extravaganza! Laugh along with De Jong and his bunch of hilarious and eccentric friends, known as The First Team, as they create and perform in perhaps the worst band of all time, unaware that the consequences of their uniquely shambolic concert, will prove to be a deadly one. Gasp as De Jong earnestly juggles the mundane daily routine of his working life around two contrasting love affairs, while the shadows of a psychotic boss and a mysterious killer, stalk his every move. Marvel at how De Jong still manages to find the time, in the middle of all the bodies, to enjoy a roller coaster lifestyle of parties, drinking and nightclubs. And happily follow De Jong’s odyssey through 156 momentous days, until his devastating and tragic secret is revealed, in a heart-rending climax. A romantic and savagely funny satire on British youth culture and the pre-political correctness era of the 1980s, YOU LIKE THAT DON’T YOU? is often a harsh, lewd and challenging tale, full of symbolic imagery. THIS WAS NOT WHAT GEORGE ORWELL HAD FORESEEN FOR 1984

    • Adventure

      Erupting Lies

      by Beverley Bassett Broad

      3rd Book in a historical Saga Covers the eruption of Mount Tarawera in New Zealand and exciting dramatic events between NZ and Europe

    • Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)
      October 2002

      Drømmer om storhet

      by Pål H. Christiansen

      Drømmer om storhet is about a down-on-his-luck 40ish writer obsessed about Paul Waaktaar-Savoy of the rock group a-ha. Hobo has published a few books and poems in the past and now works as a proof-reader for a newspaper. He aspires to write a Nobel Prize winning literary novel, but has a loose grip on reality. He selects Paul Waaktaar-Savoy as his idol, as someone like him who struggled from a little known country to break out on the world scene. Hobo has a penchant for words. His favorite book is the dictionary and, of course, he plays Scrabble with his girl friend Helle. He and his odd friends make for a humorous story laced with actual tidbits about a-ha.

    • Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)
      September 2008

      The Scoundrel Days of Hobo Highbrow

      by Pål H. Christiansen

      The Scoundrel Days of Hobo Highbrow is about a down-on-his-luck 40ish writer obsessed about Paul Waaktaar-Savoy of the rock group a-ha. Hobo has published a few books and poems in the past and now works as a proof-reader for a newspaper. He aspires to write a Nobel Prize winning literary novel, but has a loose grip on reality. He selects Paul Waaktaar-Savoy as his idol, as someone like him who struggled from a little known country to break out on the world scene. Hobo has a penchant for words. His favorite book is the dictionary and, of course, he plays Scrabble with his girl friend Helle. He and his odd friends make for a humorous story laced with actual tidbits about a-ha.

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