• Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2019

      A Little Gay History of Wales

      by Daryl Leeworthy

      A Little Gay History of Wales tells the compelling story of Welsh LGBT life from the Middle Ages to the present day. Drawing on a rich array of archival sources from across Britain, together with oral testimony and material culture, this pioneering study is the first to examine the experiences of ordinary LGBT men and women, and how they embarked on coming out, coming together and changing the world. This is the story of poets who wrote about same-sex love and translators who worked to create a language to describe it; activists who campaigned for equality and politicians who created the legislation providing it; teenagers ringing advice lines for guidance on coming out, and revellers in the pioneering bars and clubs on a Friday and Saturday night. It is also a study of prejudice and of intolerance, of emigration and isolation, of HIV/AIDS and Section 28 – all features of the complex historical reality of LGBT life and same-sex desire. Engaging and accessible, absorbing and perceptive, this book is an important advance in our understanding of Welsh history.

    • Food & society
      July 2010

      Wine Drinking Culture in France

      A National Myth or a Modern Passion?

      by Marion Demossier (Author)

      Wine drinking culture in France has traditionally been a source of pride for the French and in an age of concerns about the dangers of ‘binge-drinking’, a major cause of jealousy for the British. Wine drinking and the culture associated with it are, for many, an essential part of what it means to be French, but they are also part of a national construction. Described by some as a national product, or as a ‘totem drink’, wine and its attendant cultures supposedly characterise Frenchness in much the same way as being born in France, fighting for liberty or speaking French. Yet this traditional picture is now being challenged by economic, social and political forces that have transformed consumption patterns and led to the fragmentation of wine drinking culture.

    • Hispanic & Latino studies
      July 2012

      Remaking Brazil

      Contested National Identites in Contemporary Brazilian Cinema

      by Tatiana Signorelli Heise (Author)

      This volume examines Brazilian films released between 1995 and 2010, with special attention to issues of race, ethnicity and national identity. Focusing on the idea of the nation as an ‘imagined community’, the author discuss the various ways in which dominant ideas about brasilidade (Brazilian national consciousness) are dramatised, supported or attacked in contemporary fiction and documentary films.

    • Cultural studies
      July 2010

      Postmodernity in Contemporary Spanish Fiction and Culture

      by Yaw Agawu-Kakraba (Author)

      Postmodernity in Spanish Fiction and Culture attempts a concise approach to the question of postmodernity in Spain since the advent of democracy. The study presents Spain as one of the most postmodern of all European nations and argues that exclusive social and cultural experiences such as the movida, the desencanto, political pasotismo, immigration, globalization, and terrorism are not only patently Spanish but also that in their totality, they constitute a powerful postmodern current in Spain.

    • Gender studies, gender groups
      August 2010

      Gendering Border Studies

      by Jane Aaron (Editor), Henrice Altink (Editor), Chris Weedon (Editor)

      The study of borders has recently undergone significant transitions, reflecting changes in the functions of boundaries themselves, as the world political map has experienced transformations. Gender (defined as the knowledge about perceived distinctions between the sexes) is an important signifier of borders as constructed and contested lines of differences. In the interplay with other categories of difference, such as class, race, ethnicity and religion, it plays a major role in giving meaning to different forms of borders. It is not surprising, then, that an increasing number of studies in the last years have aimed for a gendering of border studies. This book aims to explore this new interdisciplinary field and develop it further. The main questions it asks are: how do we define ‘borders’, ‘frontiers’ and ‘boundaries’ in different disciplinary approaches of gendered border studies? What were and are the main fields of gendered border studies? What might be important questions for future research? And how useful is an inter- or transdisciplinary approach for gendered border studies? Fifteen established scholars from various disciplines contribute chapters in which they set out how the issue of gender and borders has been approached in their discipline and describe what they expect from future research. After a detailed introduction presenting these issues, the book is divided into four sections: migration and gender; gendered narratives of border crossing; gender and the drawing of internal boundaries, and teaching gendered borders.

    • History of ideas
      April 2011

      Imperfect Cosmopolis

      Studies in the history of international legal theory and cosmopolitan ideas

      by Georg Cavallar (Author)

      The unifying theme of the book is the imperfect nature of the cosmopolitan approaches and schemes of selected writers in early modern European history. It challenges the widespread assumption that the eighteenth century was a cosmopolitan century, and argues that many writers labelled as ‘cosmopolitans’ turn out to be half-way cosmopolitans at best, writers focussing on European society (rather than their own home countries), or endorsing a form of cosmopolitanism very different from contemporary notions. Individual chapters analyse the cosmopolitan dimension of the so-called ‘classical’ writers of the law of nations like Vitoria, Wolff or Vattel and their role as possible accomplices of European colonialism and exploitation, the pan-European or cosmopolitan plans of some British authors, the economic, indirect and weak cosmopolitanism of more mainstream authors like Hume or Smith, and late eighteenth-century international legal theory and its gradual move towards a state-centred approach. The idea of a universal natural law was compatible with a hierarchy of races in the past. Moral or human rights cosmopolitanism was often imperfect, half-hearted, or half-baked, though the book argues that we should be lenient with these early attempts. Forms of indirect, long-term economic cosmopolitanism usually triumphed over its contractual version. One chapter offers an interpretation of a passage in Kant’s Perpetual Peace, where he characterized the natural lawyers Grotius, Pufendorf und Vattel as “miserable comforters”, and an exposition of his criticism of their international theories from a cosmopolitan perspective.

    • Poverty & unemployment
      June 2011

      Poverty Ethics and Justice

      by Hennie Lötter (Author)

      Poverty is one of the most serious moral issues of our time that does not yet get the appropriate response it deserves. This book first gives an in depth moral analysis and evaluation of the complex manifestations of poverty. It then offers a series of ethical reasons to motivate everyone to engage in the struggle to eradicate poverty. Social science research results are synthesized into a definition and explanation of poverty that provide proper background for moral evaluation. Poverty is defined as a many-faceted phenomenon consisting of tightly interwoven characteristics that play out in a complexity of manners depending on the unique circumstances in individual situations. The following series of claims are defended in the book: (1) Poverty is a complex phenomenon that can have a wide ranging series of negative impacts on individuals and societies; (2) Poverty must be understood from a variety of ethical perspectives and through different metaphors; (3) Poverty and its consequences undermine the dignity of its sufferers and thus must be eradicated for its inhuman consequences; (4) Poverty affects all the networks humans are involved in and thus diminishes the quality of life of all human beings; (5) We must evaluate all possible dimensions of the phenomenon of poverty in terms of values of ethics and justice generally shared in contemporary liberal democracies. (6) Poverty can best be addressed through collective human action after re-imagining the goal and purpose of political institutions and a reformulation of the purposes aid ought to be for.

    • Gay studies (Gay men)
      July 2011

      Los Invisibles

      A History of Male Homosexuality in Spain

      by R. Cleminson (Author)

      Research into homosexuality in Spain is in its infancy. The last ten or fifteen years have seen a proliferation of studies on gender in Spain but much of this work has concentrated on women's history, literature and femininity. In contrast to existing research which concentrates on literature and literary figures, "Los Invisibles" focuses on the change in cultural representation of same-sex activity of through medicalisation, social and political anxieties about race and the late emergence of homosexual sub-cultures in the last quarter of the twentieth century. As such, this book constitutes an analysis of discourses and ideas from a social history and medical history position. Much of the research for the book was supported by a grant from the Wellcome Trust to research the medicalisation of homosexuality in Spain.

    • Urban communities
      October 2012

      Mindscapes of Montreal

      Québec’s Urban Novel, 1960-2005

      by Ceri Morgan (Author)

      In examining a number of francophone Montréal novels from 1960 to 2005, this interdisciplinary study considers the ways in which these connect with material landscapes to produce a city of neighbourhoods. In so doing, it reflects on how Montréal has been seen as both home and not home for francophone Quebecers. Morgan offers an overview of the fiction; examines micro and macro geographies of Montréal, and identifies some key literary trends. In so doing, it reflects on the importance of the imaginary in our experiencing and understanding of the urban.

    • Social interaction
      November 2012

      Radio in Small Nations

      Production, Programmes, Audiences

      by Richard J. Hand (Editor), Mary Traynor (Editor) ,

      This is the first title in a new series of volumes examining different dimensions of the media and culture in small nations. Whether at a local, national or international level, radio has played and continues to play a key role in nurturing or denying – even destroying – people’s sense of ‘belonging’ to a particular community, whether it be defined in terms of place, ethnicity, language or patterns of consumption. Typically, the radio has been used for purposes of propaganda and as a means of forging national identity both at home and also further afield in the case of colonial exploits. Drawing on examples of four models of, the chapters in this volume will provide an historical and contemporary overview of radio in a number of small nations. The authors propose a stimulating discussion on the role radio has played in a variety of nation contexts worldwide.

    • Gender studies: women
      November 2012

      Women's Writing and Muslim Societies

      The Search for Dialogue, 1920-present

      by Sharif Gemie (Author)

      Women’s Writing and Muslim Societies looks at the rise in works concerning Muslim societies by both western and Muslim women – from pioneering female travellers like Freya Stark and Edith Wharton in the early twentieth century, whose accounts of the Orient were usually playful and humorous, to the present day and such works as Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran and Betty Mahmoody’s Not Without My Daughter, which present a radically different view of Muslim Societies marked by fear, hostility and even disgust. The author, Sharif Gemie, also considers a new range of female Muslim writers whose works suggest a variety of other perspectives that speak of difficult journeys, the problems of integration, identity crises and the changing nature of Muslim cultures; in the process, this volume examines varied journeys across cultural, political and religious borders, discussing the problems faced by female travellers, the problems of trans-cultural romances and the difficulties of constructing dialogue between enemy camps.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      Women's Writing and Muslim Societies

      The Search for Dialogue, 1920-present

      by Sharif Gemie (Author)

      Women’s Writing and Muslim Societies looks at the rise in works concerning Muslim societies by both western and Muslim women – from pioneering female travellers like Freya Stark and Edith Wharton in the early twentieth century, whose accounts of the Orient were usually playful and humorous, to the present day and such works as Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran and Betty Mahmoody’s Not Without My Daughter, which present a radically different view of Muslim Societies marked by fear, hostility and even disgust. The author, Sharif Gemie, also considers a new range of female Muslim writers whose works suggest a variety of other perspectives that speak of difficult journeys, the problems of integration, identity crises and the changing nature of Muslim cultures; in the process, this volume examines varied journeys across cultural, political and religious borders, discussing the problems faced by female travellers, the problems of trans-cultural romances and the difficulties of constructing dialogue between enemy camps.

    • Social interaction
      January 2013

      The Mexican Transition

      Politics, Culture & Democracy in the Twenty-first Century

      by Roger Bartra (Author)

      This book is a collection of essays on the Mexican transition to democracy that offers reflections on different aspects of civic culture, the political process, electoral struggles, and critical junctures. They were written at different points in time and even though they have been corrected and adapted, they have kept the tension and fervour with which they were originally created. They provide the reader with a vision of what goes on behind those horrifying images that depict Mexico as a country plagued by narcotrafficking groups and subjected to unbridled homicidal violence. These images hide the complex political reality of the country and the accidents and shocks democracy has suffered.

    • Gender studies: women
      June 2014

      Dwy Gymraes, Dwy Gymru

      Hanes Bywyd a Gwaith Gwyneth Vaughan a Sara Maria Saunders

      by Rosanne Reeves (Author)

      Cyflwyniad o fywyd a gwaith dwy awdur benywaidd o gefn gwlad Cymru yn ail hanner y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg a geir yn y llyfr hwn. Mae’n torri tir newydd yn hanes llenyddiaeth y Gymraes gan nad oes ymchwil manwl wedi ei wneud cyn hyn ar Gwyneth Vaughan a Sara Maria Saunders, dwy a bontiodd y bwlch rhwng yr awduresau petrusgar a ddenwyd allan o’u hogofâu gan Granogwen, golygydd y Frythones (1879–89), a’r rhai a ddaeth ar eu hôl yn yr ugeinfed ganrif. Dyma ychwanegiad gwerthfawr at yr amryw gyfrolau ac erthyglau sydd wedi ymddangos ers yr 1980au ar gyfraniad hollbwysig y Gymraes at ddiwylliant ei chenedl. Mae’n lyfr delfrydol i unrhyw un sy’n ymddiddori yn hanes a llenyddiaeth y Gymraes yn ail hanner y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg, gan dorri tir newydd yn hanes llenyddiaeth y Gymraes a chyfoethogi ein dealltwriaeth o awduron benywaidd anghofiedig y Gymru Gymraeg.

    • Gender studies: women
      July 2014

      Y Llawes Goch a’r Faneg Wen

      Y Corff Benywaidd a’i Symbolaeth mewn Ffuglen Gymraeg gan Fenywod

      by Mair Rees (Author)

      Mae’r gyfrol hon yn gofyn ‘sut mae awduron benywaidd wedi ymdrin â’u profiadau corfforol mwyaf dwys a phersonol yn ei ffuglen Cymraeg ?’ Defnyddia bersbectif ffeministaidd i ystyried potensial y corff benywaidd fel cyfrwng symbolaidd i fynegi syniadau ehangach am ein diwylliant. Ceir trafodaeth eang a deallus sydd yn rhychwantu sawl cenhedlaeth o awduron, o Dyddgu Owen a Kate Bosse-Griffiths yn y pumdegau hyd at awduron cyfoes megis Bethan Gwanas a Caryl Lewis.

    • Gender studies, gender groups
      September 2013

      Poetry, geography, gender

      Women rewriting contemporary Wales

      by Alice Entwistle (Author)

      Poetry, Geography, Gender explores literary and geographical analysis, cultural criticism and gender politics in the work of such well-known literary figures as Gwyneth Lewis, Menna Elfyn, Christine Evans and Gillian Clarke, alongside newer names like Zoë Skoulding and Samantha Wynne-Rhydderch. Drawing on her unpublished interviews with many of the featured poets, Alice Entwistle examines how and why their various senses of affiliation with a shared cultural hinterland should encourage us to rethink the relationship between nation, identity and literary aesthetics in post-devolution Wales. This series of lively and detailed close readings reveals how writers use the textual terrain of the poem, both literally and metaphorically, to register and script aesthetic as well as geo-political and cultural-historical change. As an innovative critical study, this volume thus takes particular interest in the ways in which author, text and territory help to inform and produce each other in the culturally complex and confident small nation that is twenty-first-century Wales.

    • Food & society
      July 2010

      Wine Drinking Culture in France

      A National Myth or a Modern Passion?

      by Marion Demossier (Author)

      Wine drinking culture in France has traditionally been a source of pride for the French and in an age of concerns about the dangers of ‘binge-drinking’, a major cause of jealousy for the British. Wine drinking and the culture associated with it are, for many, an essential part of what it means to be French, but they are also part of a national construction. Described by some as a national product, or as a ‘totem drink’, wine and its attendant cultures supposedly characterise Frenchness in much the same way as being born in France, fighting for liberty or speaking French. Yet this traditional picture is now being challenged by economic, social and political forces that have transformed consumption patterns and led to the fragmentation of wine drinking culture.

    • Poverty & unemployment
      March 2013

      Poverty, Ethics and Justice (NiP)

      by H. P. P. Lötter

      Poverty violates fundamental human values through its impact on individuals and human environments. Poverty also goes against the core values of democratic societies. Lotter talks about poverty in ways that depict this devastating human condition clearly. He shows why inequalities associated with poverty require our serious moral concern. To eradicate poverty appropriately, shared ethical values must guide aid. In addition, a proper conception of justice can prevent poverty from occurring. Furthermore, we must re-imagine the role of the state to enable collective human responsibility for poverty’s successful eradication.

    • Society & culture: general
      June 2012

      Barcelona

      Visual Culture, Space and Power

      by Helena Buffery (Editor), Carlota Caulfield (Editor),

      This fully illustrated, edited volume brings together fresh insights into the changing urban space of Barcelona from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present day. The volume will contribute to the excavation of the avantgarde in Barcelona, as well as its legacy in the post-war period, although its primary focus will be on the relationship between environment, identity and performance as explored by countercultural artists and communities from the 1960s to the present day.

    • Gender studies: women
      March 2018

      Women, Identity and Religion in Wales

      Theology, Poetry, Story

      by Manon Ceridwen James

      This book explores the relationship between religion and identity in the lives of Welsh women today. Manon Ceridwen James looks at the recent history of religion in Wales, as well as women’s writings and the way in which women have faced and continue to face unique pressures to be respectable.

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