• Children's & young adult fiction & true stories
      November 2014

      The Egyptian Princess

      by Jane Waller

      Peter Philips, the time-traveller from 'Saving the Dinosaurs' (also by Jane Waller), now thirteen, is sent back 5,000 years to Ancient Egypt at the time of the Fourth Dynasty. There he finds a world where the wheel has not yet been invented, where the prayers of the Pharaoh alone guarantee that the Nile will provide sufficient water for the crops, and where Ra-Atum, the Sun God, has to travel by boat throughout the Underworld each night in order to rise next morning. Shortly after his arrival he is befriended by the Pharaoh's daughter, Princess Mer-tio-tess, who believes he is a spirit sent to help her. While increasingly attracted towards the Princess he finds himself drawn into a web of power struggle and rivalry. And things get worse when Peter, by accident, brings her back to present-day London, a cold place filled with sad-looking people which, she believes, must be the Underworld.

    • Celtic religion & mythology
      November 2015

      Understanding Celtic Religion

      Revisiting the Pagan Past

      by Katja Ritari & Alexandra Bergholm eds.

      Although it has long been acknowledged that the early Irish literary corpus preserves both pre-Christian and Christian elements, the challenges involved in the understanding of these different strata have not been subjected to critical examination. This volume draws attention to the importance of reconsidering the relationship between religion and mythology, as well as the concept of ‘Celtic religion’ itself. When scholars are attempting to construct the so-called ‘Celtic’ belief system, what counts as ‘religion’? Or, when labelling something as ‘religion’ as opposed to ‘mythology’, what do these entities entail? This volume is the first interdisciplinary collection of articles which critically reevaluates the methodological challenges of the study of ‘Celtic religion’; the authors are eminent scholars in the field of Celtic Studies representing the disciplines of theology, literary studies, history, law and archaeology, and the book represents a significant contribution to the present scholarly debate concerning the pre-Christian elements in early medieval source materials.

    • Celtic religion & mythology

      Understanding Celtic Religion

      Revisiting the Pagan Past

      by Katja Ritari (Editor), Alexandra Bergholm (Editor)

      Although it has long been acknowledged that the early Irish literary corpus preserves both pre-Christian and Christian elements, the challenges involved in the understanding of these different strata have not been subjected to critical examination. This volume draws attention to the importance of reconsidering the relationship between religion and mythology, as well as the concept of ‘Celtic religion’ itself. When scholars are attempting to construct the so-called ‘Celtic’ belief system, what counts as ‘religion’? Or, when labelling something as ‘religion’ as opposed to ‘mythology’, what do these entities entail? This volume is the first interdisciplinary collection of articles which critically reevaluates the methodological challenges of the study of ‘Celtic religion’; the authors are eminent scholars in the field of Celtic Studies representing the disciplines of theology, literary studies, history, law and archaeology, and the book represents a significant contribution to the present scholarly debate concerning the pre-Christian elements in early medieval source materials.

    • Celtic religion & mythology

      Understanding Celtic Religion

      Revisiting the Pagan Past

      by Katja Ritari (Editor), Alexandra Bergholm (Editor)

      Although it has long been acknowledged that the early Irish literary corpus preserves both pre-Christian and Christian elements, the challenges involved in the understanding of these different strata have not been subjected to critical examination. This volume draws attention to the importance of reconsidering the relationship between religion and mythology, as well as the concept of ‘Celtic religion’ itself. When scholars are attempting to construct the so-called ‘Celtic’ belief system, what counts as ‘religion’? Or, when labelling something as ‘religion’ as opposed to ‘mythology’, what do these entities entail? This volume is the first interdisciplinary collection of articles which critically reevaluates the methodological challenges of the study of ‘Celtic religion’; the authors are eminent scholars in the field of Celtic Studies representing the disciplines of theology, literary studies, history, law and archaeology, and the book represents a significant contribution to the present scholarly debate concerning the pre-Christian elements in early medieval source materials.

    • Celtic religion & mythology

      Understanding Celtic Religion

      Revisiting the Pagan Past

      by Katja Ritari (Editor), Alexandra Bergholm (Editor)

      Although it has long been acknowledged that the early Irish literary corpus preserves both pre-Christian and Christian elements, the challenges involved in the understanding of these different strata have not been subjected to critical examination. This volume draws attention to the importance of reconsidering the relationship between religion and mythology, as well as the concept of ‘Celtic religion’ itself. When scholars are attempting to construct the so-called ‘Celtic’ belief system, what counts as ‘religion’? Or, when labelling something as ‘religion’ as opposed to ‘mythology’, what do these entities entail? This volume is the first interdisciplinary collection of articles which critically reevaluates the methodological challenges of the study of ‘Celtic religion’; the authors are eminent scholars in the field of Celtic Studies representing the disciplines of theology, literary studies, history, law and archaeology, and the book represents a significant contribution to the present scholarly debate concerning the pre-Christian elements in early medieval source materials.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2018

      Celtic Myth in the 21st Century

      The Gods and their Stories in a Global Perspective

      by Emily Lyle

      This book explores the exciting world of Celtic mythology and demonstrates how it can be related to its prehistoric Indo-European roots.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2017

      Christian Martyrdom in Late Antiquity (300-450 AD)

      History and Discourse, Tradition and Religious Identity

      by Peter Gemeinhardt, Johan Leemans

      The present volume’s focus lies on the formation of a multifaccetted discourse on Christian martyrdom in Late Antiquity. While martyrdom accounts remain a central means of defining Christian identity, new literary genres emerge, e.g., the Lives of Saints (Athanasius on Antony), sermons (the Cappadocians), hynms (Prudentius) and more. Authors like Eusebius of Caesarea and Augustine employ martyrological language and motifs in their apologetical and polemic writings, while the Gesta Martyrum Romanorum represent a new type of veneration of the martyrs of a single site. Beyond the borders of the Roman Empire, new martyrs’ narratives can be found. Additionally, two essays deal with methodological questions of research of such sources, thereby highlighting the hitherto understudied innovations of martyrology in Late Antiquity, that is, after the end of the persecutions of Christianity by Roman Emperors. Since then, martyrology gained new importance for the formation of Christian identity within the context of a Christianized imperium. The volume thus enlarges and specifies our knowledge of this fundamental Christian discourse.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2013

      Wages of Cross-Bearing and Debt of Sin

      The Economy of Heaven in Matthew’s Gospel

      by Nathan Eubank

      In comparison to Mark and Luke, the First Gospel contains a striking preponderance of economic language in passages dealing with sin, righteousness, and divine recompense. For instance, sin is described as a debt, and righteous deeds are said to earn wages with God or treasure in heaven. This study analyzes Matthew’s economic language against the backdrop of other early Jewish and Christian literature and examines its import for the narrative as a whole. Careful attention to this neglected aspect of Matthew’s theology demonstrates that some of the Gospel’s central claims about atonement, Jesus’ death and resurrection, and divine recompense emerge from this conceptual matrix. By tracing the narrative development of the economic motif, the author explains how Jesus saves his people from their sins and comes to be enthroned as Son of Man, sheds new light on numerous exegetical puzzles, and clarifies the relationship of ethical rigorism and divine generosity.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2017

      Philosophy and Salvation in Greek Religion

      by Vishwa Adluri

      Ever since Vlastos’ “Theology and Philosophy in Early Greek Thought,” scholars have known that a consideration of ancient philosophy without attention to its theological, cosmological and soteriological dimensions remains onesided. Yet, philosophers continue to discuss thinkers such as Parmenides and Plato without knowledge of their debt to the archaic religious traditions. Perhaps our own religious prejudices allow us to see only a “polis religion” in Greek religion, while our modern philosophical openness and emphasis on reason induce us to rehabilitate ancient philosophy by what we consider the highest standard of knowledge: proper argumentation. Yet, it is possible to see ancient philosophy as operating according to a different system of meaning, a different “logic.” Such a different sense of logic operates in myth and other narratives, where the argument is neither completely illogical nor rational in the positivist sense. The articles in this volume undertake a critical engagement with this unspoken legacy of Greek religion. The aim of the volume as a whole is to show how, beyond the formalities and fallacies of arguments, something more profound is at stake in ancient philosophy: the salvation of the philosopher-initiate.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Sectarianism in Qumran

      A Cross-Cultural Perspective

      by Eyal Regev

      Sectarianism in Qumran: A Cross-Cultural Perspective explores the sectarian characteristics of the system of beliefs and laws of the two major Qumran sects of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the yahad and the Damascus Covenant, using theories of sectarianism and related topics in sociology, anthropology and the study of religion. It discusses Qumranic moral and purity boundaries, cultic rituals, wealth, gender, atonement, revelation mysticism, structure and organization and compares them with those of seven sects of the same (introversionist) type: the early Anabaptists, Mennonites, Hutterites and Amish, Puritans, Quakers and Shakers. The sociological and historical relationship between the Qumran sects and the related movements of 1 Enoch, Jubilees and the Essenes are analyzed in detail, in order to understand the socio-religious background of sectarianism in Qumran and its subsequent variations. Throughout the chapters, differences between the yahad, the Damascus Covenant and the Essenes are observed in relation to social boundaries, social structure, gender relations, revelation and inclination towards mysticism. Points of resemblance and difference are traced between the Qumran sects and the early-modern Christian ones, and several different patterns of sectarian ideology and behaviour are noticed among all these sects.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      March 2010

      Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity

      by Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui

      Many recent discoveries have confirmed the importance of Orphism for ancient Greek religion, philosophy and literature. Its nature and role are still, however, among the most debated problems of Classical scholarship. A cornerstone of the question is its relationship to Christianity, which modern authors have too often discussed from apologetic perspectives or projections of the Christian model into its supposed precedent. Besides, modern approaches are strongly based on ancient ones, since Orpheus and the poems and mysteries attributed to him were fundamental in the religious controversies of Late Antiquity. Both Pagan and Christian authors often present Orphism as a precedent, alternative or imitation of Chistianity.This free and thorough study of the ancient sources sheds light on these controversial questions. The presence of the Orphic tradition in Imperial Age, documented by literary and epigraphical evidence, is confronted with the informations transmitted by Christian apologists on Orphic poems and cults. The manifold Christian treatments of Pagan sources, and their particular value to understand Greek religion, are illuminated by this specific case, which exemplifies the complex encounter between Classical culture and Jewish-Christian tradition.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2009

      War and Ethics in the Ancient Near East

      Military Violence in Light of Cosmology and History

      by C. L. Crouch

      The monograph considers the relationships of ethical systems in the ancient Near East through a study of warfare in Judah, Israel and Assyria in the eighth and seventh centuries BCE. It argues that a common cosmological and ideological outlook generated similarities in ethical thinking. In all three societies, the mythological traditions surrounding creation reflect a strong connection between war, kingship and the establishment of order. Human kings’ military activities are legitimated through their identification with this cosmic struggle against chaos, begun by the divine king at creation. Military violence is thereby cast not only as morally tolerable but as morally imperative. Deviations from this point of view reflect two phenomena: the preservation of variable social perspectives and the impact of historical changes on ethical thinking.The research begins the discussion of ancient Near Eastern ethics outside of Israel and Judah and fills a scholarly void by placing Israelite and Judahite ethics within this context, as well as contributing methodologically to future research in historical and comparative ethics.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2001

      Homo Pictor

      by Gottfried Boehm, Hans Belting, Peter Blome, Gottfried Boehm, Gabriele Brandstetter, Iris Därmann, Georges Didi-Hubermann, Peter Geimer, Fritz Graf, Alois Haas, Erik Hornung, Othmar Keel, Christiane Kruse, Jean-Marie Le Tensorer, Achatz von Müller, Gerhard Neumann, Oswald Panagl, Hanna Philipp, Arbogast Schmitt, Victor I. Stoichita, Bernhard Waldenfels, Stephan Hauser

      Die Colloquia Raurica werden alle zwei Jahre vom CollegiumRauricum veranstaltet. Sie finden auf Castelen, dem Landgut der Römer-Stiftung Dr. René Clavel in Augst (Augusta Raurica) bei Basel, statt.Jedes Colloquium behandelt eine aktuelle geisteswissenschaftliche Frage von allgemeinem Interesse aus der Perspektiveverschiedener Disziplinen. Einen Schwerpunkt bilden dabei Beiträge aus dem Bereich der Altertumswissenschaft. Um möglichst vielseitig abgestützte Erkenntnisse zu gewinnen, erörtern die eingeladenen Fachvertreter das Tagungsthema im gemeinsamen Gespräch. Die Ergebnissedes Colloquiumwerden in der Schriftenreihe Colloquia Raurica publiziert.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2013

      Miracles Revisited

      New Testament Miracle Stories and their Concepts of Reality

      by Stefan Alkier, Annette Weissenrieder

      Since David Hume, the interpretation of miracle stories has been dominated in the West by the binary distinction of fact vs. fiction. The form-critical method added another restriction to the interpretation of miracles by neglecting the context of its macrotexts. Last but not least the hermeneutics of demythologizing was interested in the self-understanding of individuals and not in political perspectives.The book revisits miracle stories with regard to these dimensions: 1. It demands to connect the interpretation of Miracle Stories to concepts of reality. 2. It criticizes the restrictions of the form critical method. 3. It emphasizes the political implications of Miracle Stories and their interpretations.Even the latest research accepts this modern opposition of fact and fiction as self-evident. This book will examine critically these concepts of reality with interpretations of miracles. The book will address how concepts of reality, always complex, came to expression in stories of miraculous healings and their reception in medicine, art, literature, theology and philosophy, from classic antiquity to the Middle Ages. Only through such bygone concepts, contemporary interpretations of ancient healings can gain plausibility.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2017

      Religion and Ideology in Assyria

      by Beate Pongratz-Leisten

      Addressing the relationship between religion and ideology, and drawing on a range of literary, ritual, and visual sources, this book reconstructs the cultural discourse of Assyria from the third through the first millennium BCE. Ideology is delineated here as a subdiscourse of religion rather than as an independent category, anchoring it firmly within the religious world view. Tracing Assur's cultural interaction with the south on the one hand, and with the Syro-Anatolian horizon on the other, this volume articulates a "northern" cultural discourse that, even while interacting with southern Mesopotamian tradition, managed to maintain its own identity. It also follows the development of tropes and iconic images from the first city state of Uruk and their mouvance between myth, image, and royal inscription, historiography and myth, and myth and ritual, suggesting that, with the help of scholars, key royal figures were responsible for introducing new directions for the ideological discourse and for promoting new forms of historiography.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      October 2020

      Die "Johannis" Coripps

      Kritische Edition mit Übersetzung

      by Thomas Gärtner

      Das Epos des nordafrikanischen Dichters Coripp (6. Jh.) über die Leistungen des byzantinischen Feldherrn Johannes Troglita wird hier in einer neuen kritischen Ausgabe vorgelegt und erstmals mit einer vollständigen deutschen Übersetzung versehen. Die Edition beruht auf den Ergebnissen der 2008 erschienenen Monographie "Untersuchungen zur Gestaltung und zum historischen Stoff der Johannis Coripps" (UaLG 90) und wird durch einen gleichzeitig erscheinenden kritischen Kommentar (UaLG 92) ergänzt. Die Neuausgabe berücksichtigt insbesondere die erschlossenen historischen und poetischen Vorbilder und verbessert die Interpunktion wesentlich.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2017

      Evil and Death

      Conceptions of the Human in Biblical, Early Jewish, Greco-Roman and Egyptian Literature

      by Beate Ego, Ulrike Mittmann

      Die anthropologischen Konzeptionen im Judentum der hellenistisch-römischen Zeit bilden ein wichtiges Bindeglied zwischen den entsprechenden Traditionen der älteren Texte der Hebräischen Bibel und denjenigen des Neuen Testaments sowie der rabbinischen Überlieferungen. Sie als einen konstitutiven Faktor religiöser Identität wahrzunehmen, ist für die religionsgeschichtliche Erforschung des antiken Judentums wie auch für eine an Traditionslinien orientierte Biblische Theologie unabdingbar. Trotz zahlreicher Forschungen zur Antropologie der biblischen Überlieferungen im Alten und Neuen Testament bzw. zu den anthropologischen Konzepten ihrer Nachbarkulturen stellt eine Aufarbeitung dieser Thematik aber ein Forschungsdesiderat dar. Vor diesem Hintergrund versammelt dieser Band 20 einschlägige Aufsätze international bekannter Wissenschaftler zum Thema „Sünde und Tod“ . Ein besonderer Schwerpunkt liegt dabei auf der Einbeziehung des Materials aus den benachbarten Kulturen, wobei auch ägyptische Quellen zu Wort kommen. Der Band bietet so exemplarisch wichtige Grundlagen für die weitere Erforschung der antik-jüdischen Anthropologie in ihren kulturellen Bezügen.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Dimensions of Yahwism in the Persian Period

      Studies in the Religion and Society of the Judaean Community at Elephantine

      by Gard Granerød

      What was Judaean religion in the Persian period like? Is it necessary to use the Bible to give an answer to the question? Among other things the study argues that • the religion practiced in the 5th c. BCE Elephantine community and which is reflected in the so-called Elephantine documents represent a well-attested manifestation of lived Persian period Yahwism,• as religio-historical sources, the Elephantine documents reveal more about the actual religious practice of the Elephantine Judaeans than what the highly edited and canonised texts of the Bible reveal about the religious practice of the contemporary Yahwistic coreligionists in Judah, and• the image of the Elephantine Judaism emerging from the Elephantine documents can revise the canonised image of Judaean religion in the Persian period (cf. A. Assmann). The Elephantine Yahwism should not be interpreted within a framework dependent upon theological, conceptual and spatial concepts alien to it, such as biblical ones. The study proposes an alternative framework by approaching the Elephantine documents on the basis of N. Smart’s multidimensional model of religion. Elephantine should not be exotified but brought to the very centre of any discussion of the history of Judaism.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 1999

      Elia und die Monolatrie

      Ein Beitrag zur religionsgeschichtlichen Rückfrage nach dem vorschriftprophetischen Jahwe-Glauben

      by Martin Beck

      In der Reihe Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (BZAW) erscheinen Arbeiten zu sämtlichen Gebieten der alttestamentlichen Wissenschaft. Im Zentrum steht die Hebräische Bibel, ihr Vor- und Nachleben im antiken Judentum sowie ihre vielfache Verzweigung in die benachbarten Kulturen der altorientalischen und hellenistisch-römischen Welt.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 1974

      The Origins of Greek Religion

      by Bernard C. Dietrich

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