• Christian mission & evangelism
      April 2016

      Liberating the Gospel

      Translating the message of Jesus in a globalised world

      by David Smith (By (author))

      ‘My hope is to overcome the apartheid between the academy and the congregation, suggesting ways in which cutting-edge biblical scholarship can be a positive and liberating force for Christianity in the twenty first century.’ Liberating the Gospel is prefaced by Tom Wright’s claim that Christians have for too long ‘read scripture with nineteenth-century eyes and sixteenth century questions’, and that it is urgently necessary they learn to read ‘with first century eyes and twenty first century questions’. The central section of the book concentrates on reading the narratives of the Galilean ministry of Jesus within their first century context, then exploring Paul’s mission in the setting of the urban and imperial world of Rome, before offering reflection on the Apocalypse in the changed world following the destruction of Jerusalem. Smith then concludes his treatise facing the ‘twenty first century questions’, seeking to build a hermeneutical bridge to our globalised world. As a whole this major new book on Christian mission aims to contribute toward an understanding of how the dynamic message of Christ might be liberated to be heard as genuinely good news today, in the process potentially transforming Christianity, provided there is willingness to face opposition from a world resistant to the exposure of its injustices.

    • Christian mission & evangelism
      February 2003

      Mission After Christendom

      by David Smith (By (author))

      Eloquently describes and analyses the crisis in mission and proposes a new way forward in the light of a series of brilliant and surprising studies of relevant biblical narratives.

    • Christian mission & evangelism
      May 2006

      Mission Under Scrutiny

      Confronting Current Challenges

      by Andrew Kirk (By (author))

      Alternative religions, spiritualities and therapies have flooded the market place. In a multi-cultural, tolerant and permissive environment, it is virtually forbidden to distinguish sharply between true and false, genuine and spurious faiths and values. In Mission Under Scrutiny, J. Andrew Kirk explores the role of mission in a post-modern, secular society, and focuses his controversial argument on the tough issues churches have to face, including the authority of scripture in a pluralist culture, the role of religion in conflict and the role of evangelism in the contemporary world. This book will appeal to those who wish to understand better some of the most pressing questions facing the Christian community’s vocation to mission. The author explores each theme with sensitivity, calling upon his considerable experience of worldwide mission to throw light on the nature of the issues and to suggest possible responses that Christians need to embrace in order to meet the challenges.

    • Christian mission & evangelism
      June 2005

      What a Friend We Have in Jesus

      The Evangelical Tradition

      by Ian Randall (By (author))

      The influence of evangelicalism within the Christian churches has never been stronger. This new study reveals the breadth and range of what has been described as ‘the slumbering giant in the world of spirituality’. Evangelicalism has its origins in the evangelical revival of the eighteenth century, but it has strong links with the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century and the English Puritan movement of the 17th century. An ideal introduction for readers of every background to a vital tradition of spirituality not confined to one country or one denomination. Ian Randall describes the characteristic features of evangelism and the major strands within the tradition, and shows how much evangelical spirituality has changed and developed over time.

    • Christian mission & evangelism
      June 1999

      What is Mission?

      Theological Explorations

      by J. Andrew Kirk (By (author))

      What is Mission lays the foundations for an understanding of theology and mission. It explores contemporary issues in mission including the reception of the gospel by different cultures, encounters with other world religions and care of the environment. Finally, it asks what is would mean for the future if the Church were to recognise more fully its missionary nature.

    • Christian theology
      November 2009

      The Notion of Mission in Karl Barth’s Ecclesiology

      by Author(s): Wessel Bentley

      As the church moves towards its 21st century of existence, it is confronted by challenges it has never known before. Globalization, the rise of different socio-political orders and a growing tendency towards a post-modern understanding of the world are but some of the issues. This changing world demands self-reflection from the church. It has to consider its place, identity and function, thereby giving rise to the exploration of its mission.In this book, the ecclesiology of Karl Barth is explored. By considering Barth’s understanding of the church’s relationship with different parties such as God, other religions, those outside the Christian faith, the State and its own inner dynamics, the church will be reminded of its missionary function in the world. The church’s relationships are important for they direct the way in which it fits into the world. When it considers that it exists purely because of God’s self-revelation, and that its own existence is an act of faith in response to this divine self-disclosure, it becomes aware of defined parameters within which the church can operate under the banner of mission.

    • Social & cultural history
      July 2012

      The Churches and the Working Classes

      Leeds, 1870-1920

      by Author(s): Patricia Midgley

      Contrary to our perception of the centrality of the churches in English life in the nineteenth century, the disappointing results of the 1851 Religious Census led religious leaders to seek a variety of ways to increase religious allegiance as the century progressed. The apparent apathy and lack of interest in formal religion on the part of the working classes was particularly galling, and the various denominations tried hard to attract them through evangelical missions as well as social and charitable ventures which sometimes competed with religious concerns, to the latter’s detriment. This book traces the motivations, concerns and efforts of the churches, particularly in the period between 1870 and 1920, and the ambivalent responses of ordinary people. The Education Act of 1870 led to the churches losing their hold on the education of the young, a consequence foreseen by many church leaders, but unable to be prevented. By 1920 it was apparent that the churches’ optimism regarding an increased role with a war-weary population would not be fulfilled. The focus is on the city of Leeds, representative of the industrialised urban areas with burgeoning populations which proved to be such a challenge to the churches, at the same time stimulating them to ever-greater efforts.

    • 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000
      June 2018

      Saving Sinners, even Moslems

      The Arabian Mission (1889-1973) and its Intellectual Roots

      by Author(s): Jerzy Zdanowski

      This book investigates the Mission of the Reformed Church in America sent to Arabia in 1889 to preach the Gospel, and which operated in the Persian Gulf until 1973. It also explores the various cultural encounters between missionaries and Muslims, and discusses conversion and the place of Islam in the Protestant eschatology. It maintains that John G. Lansing from the New Brunswick Theological Seminary, New Jersey, who founded the Arabian Mission, deliberately dedicated the Mission to “direct Muslim evangelism”. In terms of premillennialism, Lansing “moved” Islam into the very centre of the theological discourse, and presented the evangelization of Muslims as critical for Christ’s Second Coming. This made the Arabian Mission unique among the American Protestant Missions, and placed the Church and missionaries between religious pluralism and the obligations of the Great Commission.

    • History: specific events & topics
      June 2012

      In the Light and Shadow of an Emperor

      Tomás Pereira, SJ (1645–1708), the Kangxi Emperor and the Jesuit Mission in China

      by Editor(s): Artur K. Wardega, SJ, and António Vasconcelos de Saldanha

      The present collection was written to commemorate the third centenary of the death of the Portuguese Jesuit, Tomás Pereira (1645–1708). Dealing with some of the most decisive and controversial moments in the history of the Jesuit mission in China during the Kangxi era (1662–1722), these essays were produced by an international team of scholars and cover a wide range of topics that reflect a permanent academic interest, in Europe and America as well as in China, in the history of the Catholic mission in China, Sino-Russian diplomacy, the history of Western science and music in China, intercultural history, and history of art.While the names of such missionaries as Matteo Ricci, Adam Schall and Ferdinand Verbiest are well known, Pereira has been relatively neglected, and this volume seeks to redress that imbalance. Pereira was important as a musician and diplomat and was closer to the Kangxi emperor than any other Westerner, something that enabled him to exert considerable influence for the protection of the Chinese Christians and also to further the interests of Portugal in China. However, towards the end of his life he saw his efforts undermined by the damaging consequences of the papal legation to China led by Charles-Thomas Maillard de Tournon.

    • Hispanic & Latino studies
      December 2013

      Manufacturing Otherness

      Missions and Indigenous Cultures in Latin America

      by Editor(s): Sergio Botta

      The discovery of the New World offered European civilisation the chance to generate a process of circulation of its own cultural values – the “spiritual conquest” – that has no comparable precedents. The missionary orders played an important role during this “Westernisation of the world,” not only as key players in the spread of Christian values, but also as mediators between different worlds. Indeed, missionary practices imposed the dominating culture’s values and institutions on the vanquished peoples. At the same time, they also promoted the circulation of new knowledge and the negotiation between different cultures during the age of a global integration of space. This book looks at the vast field of study concerning the history of missions from a specific viewpoint. Firstly, it focuses on “local” processes, singling out specific case studies to be used for a general reflection. On the other hand, it refocuses the attention on the Indigenous cultures – which the missionaries helped to bring to light in the field of Western history – showing how they succeeded in entering the areas of negotiation created by missionaries, and in producing their own cultural subjectivity.

    • Asian history
      January 2012

      The Life and Legacy of George Leslie Mackay

      An Interdisciplinary Study of Canada’s First Presbyterian Missionary to Northern Taiwan (1872 – 1901)

      by Editor(s): Clyde R. Forsberg Jr.

      George Leslie Mackay (1844–1901), the famous Canadian Presbyterian missionary who came to northern Formosa (Taiwan) in 1872 and preached specifically with aborigines in mind, is the subject of an interdisciplinary study by seven independent scholars interested in the nineteenth-century imperial project and Christian mission to China. Importantly, Mackay’s mission defies such binary opposites as East and West: the missionary a conduit of an earlier Scottish-Canadian spirituality adapted to Taiwan that allowed converts to appropriate the Presbyterian faith on their own terms; the mission field in which he operated a “biculture” of foreign initiative and aboriginal agency working hand in hand. Mackay’s ordination of aboriginal ministers, giving us the Northern Synod of the Presbyterian Church of Taiwan (PCT), was a bold departure from the imperial, Anglo-Canadian, Presbyterian norm. So, too, his marriage to a Taiwanese slave-girl, Chhang-mia, and the arranged interracial marriages that he performed between select Chinese ministers and female Taiwanese graduates (which included his two daughters). Mackay’s missionary writing and famous autobiography From Far Formosa—a fine specimen of the nineteenth-century heroic memoir genre—is notable for its defense of both gender and racial equality, and despite its unmistakable patriarchal leanings. Mackay’s repudiation of Darwinism and belief in an early type of creation science therein also locates the so-called “Barbarian Bible Man” opposite such virulent, racist theorizing as Social Darwinism and Eugenics. He was a dentist not an abortionist. A relative unknown to most Western scholars of religion, Mackay is Taiwan’s most famous native son, represented on the national stage in 2008 as a sky god and Taiwanese animistic deity of supernatural power and political influence par excellent. Although a product of the colonial times in which he lived, post-colonial scholars who ignore Mackay, his life and legacy, clearly do so at some peril.

    • Judaism: worship, rites & ceremonies
      May 2013

      Flawed Institution—Flawless Church

      A Response to Pope John Paul’s Appeal for a Critical Self-Evaluation of the Church

      by Author(s): Paul Ungar

      Contemporary news headlines, as well as the history of the Church, are replete with scandals, unholy acts, and abuses of power. Such a disappointing trend has shaken the faith of many, and made it fashionable to decry the hypocrisy of “organized religion.” Yet despite these massive stumbling blocks, the Church has always insisted, and continues to maintain, that it is none other than the Holy Body of Christ. How can these polarities be reconciled? How can the world’s trust in the Church be renewed in this postmodern era of religious indifference and apathy? How can an obviously flawed institution become the genuine Church, as intended by Jesus Christ? Responding to these questions, the author calls for a critical self-evaluation of the Church in her quest for renewal, presents a much-needed modern interdisciplinary approach to apologetics, and powerfully promotes ecumenism. This scholarly and passionately written book substantiates Christian optimism, and provides a thoughtful and convincing response to the challenges posed by skeptics such as Nietzsche, Freud, Dawkins, and their contemporary intellectual heirs.

    • Asian history
      January 2012

      The Life and Legacy of George Leslie Mackay

      An Interdisciplinary Study of Canada’s First Presbyterian Missionary to Northern Taiwan (1872 – 1901)

      by Editor(s): Clyde R. Forsberg Jr.

      George Leslie Mackay (1844–1901), the famous Canadian Presbyterian missionary who came to northern Formosa (Taiwan) in 1872 and preached specifically with aborigines in mind, is the subject of an interdisciplinary study by seven independent scholars interested in the nineteenth-century imperial project and Christian mission to China. Importantly, Mackay’s mission defies such binary opposites as East and West: the missionary a conduit of an earlier Scottish-Canadian spirituality adapted to Taiwan that allowed converts to appropriate the Presbyterian faith on their own terms; the mission field in which he operated a “biculture” of foreign initiative and aboriginal agency working hand in hand. Mackay’s ordination of aboriginal ministers, giving us the Northern Synod of the Presbyterian Church of Taiwan (PCT), was a bold departure from the imperial, Anglo-Canadian, Presbyterian norm. So, too, his marriage to a Taiwanese slave-girl, Chhang-mia, and the arranged interracial marriages that he performed between select Chinese ministers and female Taiwanese graduates (which included his two daughters). Mackay’s missionary writing and famous autobiography From Far Formosa—a fine specimen of the nineteenth-century heroic memoir genre—is notable for its defense of both gender and racial equality, and despite its unmistakable patriarchal leanings. Mackay’s repudiation of Darwinism and belief in an early type of creation science therein also locates the so-called “Barbarian Bible Man” opposite such virulent, racist theorizing as Social Darwinism and Eugenics. He was a dentist not an abortionist. A relative unknown to most Western scholars of religion, Mackay is Taiwan’s most famous native son, represented on the national stage in 2008 as a sky god and Taiwanese animistic deity of supernatural power and political influence par excellent. Although a product of the colonial times in which he lived, post-colonial scholars who ignore Mackay, his life and legacy, clearly do so at some peril.

    • Social & cultural history
      July 2012

      The Churches and the Working Classes

      Leeds, 1870-1920

      by Author(s): Patricia Midgley

      Contrary to our perception of the centrality of the churches in English life in the nineteenth century, the disappointing results of the 1851 Religious Census led religious leaders to seek a variety of ways to increase religious allegiance as the century progressed. The apparent apathy and lack of interest in formal religion on the part of the working classes was particularly galling, and the various denominations tried hard to attract them through evangelical missions as well as social and charitable ventures which sometimes competed with religious concerns, to the latter’s detriment. This book traces the motivations, concerns and efforts of the churches, particularly in the period between 1870 and 1920, and the ambivalent responses of ordinary people. The Education Act of 1870 led to the churches losing their hold on the education of the young, a consequence foreseen by many church leaders, but unable to be prevented. By 1920 it was apparent that the churches’ optimism regarding an increased role with a war-weary population would not be fulfilled. The focus is on the city of Leeds, representative of the industrialised urban areas with burgeoning populations which proved to be such a challenge to the churches, at the same time stimulating them to ever-greater efforts.

    • Christian mission & evangelism
      January 2007

      Black Robes and Buckskin

      A Selection from the Jesuit Relations

      by Catharine Randall

    • Memoirs

      Ex-gay No Way

      Survival and Recovery from Religious Abuse

      by Jallen Rix

    • Christian mission & evangelism

      Neighbors and Missionaries

      A History of the Sisters of Our Lady of Christian Doctrine

      by Margaret M. McGuinness

      The Sisters of Our Lady of Christian Doctrine community was founded in 1910 by marion gurney, who adopted the religious name Mother Marianne of Jesus. A graduate of Wellesley College and a convert to Catholicism, Gurney had served as head resident at St. Rose’s Settlement, the first Catholic settlement house in New York City. She founded the Sisters of Christian Doctrine when other communities of women religious appeared uninterested in a ministry of settlement work combined with religious education programs for children attending public schools. The community established two settlement houses in New York City—Madonna House on the Lower East Side in 1910, followed by Ave Maria House in the Bronx in 1930. Alongside their classes in religious education and preparing children and adults to receive the sacraments, the Sisters distributed food and clothing, operated a bread line, and helped their neighbors in emergencies. In 1940 Mother Marianne and the Sisters began their first major mission outside New York when they adapted the model of the urban Catholic social settlement to rural South Carolina. They also served at a number of parishes, including several in South Carolina and Florida, where they ministered to both black and white Catholics. In Neighbors and Missionaries, Margaret M. McGuinness, who was given full access to the archives of the Sisters of Christian Doctrine, traces in fascinating detail the history of the congregation, from the inspiring story of its founder and the community’s mission to provide material and spiritual support to their Catholic neighbors, to the changes and challenges of the latter half of the twentieth century. By 1960, settlement houses had been replaced by other forms of social welfare, and the lives and work of American women religious were undergoing a dramatic change. McGuinness explores how the Sisters of Christian Doctrine were affected and how they adapted their own lives and work to reflect the transformations taking place in the Church and society. Neighbors and Missionaries examines a distinctive community of women religious whose primary focus was neither teaching nor nursing/hospital administration. The choice of the Sisters of Christian Doctrine to live among the poor and to serve where other communities were either unwilling or unable demonstrates that women religious in the United States served in many different capacities as they contributed to the life and work of the American Catholic Church.

    • Christian mission & evangelism

      Neighbors and Missionaries

      A History of the Sisters of Our Lady of Christian Doctrine

      by Margaret M. McGuinness

      The Sisters of Our Lady of Christian Doctrine community was founded in 1910 by marion gurney, who adopted the religious name Mother Marianne of Jesus. A graduate of Wellesley College and a convert to Catholicism, Gurney had served as head resident at St. Rose’s Settlement, the first Catholic settlement house in New York City. She founded the Sisters of Christian Doctrine when other communities of women religious appeared uninterested in a ministry of settlement work combined with religious education programs for children attending public schools. The community established two settlement houses in New York City—Madonna House on the Lower East Side in 1910, followed by Ave Maria House in the Bronx in 1930. Alongside their classes in religious education and preparing children and adults to receive the sacraments, the Sisters distributed food and clothing, operated a bread line, and helped their neighbors in emergencies. In 1940 Mother Marianne and the Sisters began their first major mission outside New York when they adapted the model of the urban Catholic social settlement to rural South Carolina. They also served at a number of parishes, including several in South Carolina and Florida, where they ministered to both black and white Catholics. In Neighbors and Missionaries, Margaret M. McGuinness, who was given full access to the archives of the Sisters of Christian Doctrine, traces in fascinating detail the history of the congregation, from the inspiring story of its founder and the community’s mission to provide material and spiritual support to their Catholic neighbors, to the changes and challenges of the latter half of the twentieth century. By 1960, settlement houses had been replaced by other forms of social welfare, and the lives and work of American women religious were undergoing a dramatic change. McGuinness explores how the Sisters of Christian Doctrine were affected and how they adapted their own lives and work to reflect the transformations taking place in the Church and society. Neighbors and Missionaries examines a distinctive community of women religious whose primary focus was neither teaching nor nursing/hospital administration. The choice of the Sisters of Christian Doctrine to live among the poor and to serve where other communities were either unwilling or unable demonstrates that women religious in the United States served in many different capacities as they contributed to the life and work of the American Catholic Church.

    • Christian mission & evangelism

      Neighbors and Missionaries

      A History of the Sisters of Our Lady of Christian Doctrine

      by Margaret M. McGuinness

      The Sisters of Our Lady of Christian Doctrine community was founded in 1910 by marion gurney, who adopted the religious name Mother Marianne of Jesus. A graduate of Wellesley College and a convert to Catholicism, Gurney had served as head resident at St. Rose’s Settlement, the first Catholic settlement house in New York City. She founded the Sisters of Christian Doctrine when other communities of women religious appeared uninterested in a ministry of settlement work combined with religious education programs for children attending public schools. The community established two settlement houses in New York City—Madonna House on the Lower East Side in 1910, followed by Ave Maria House in the Bronx in 1930. Alongside their classes in religious education and preparing children and adults to receive the sacraments, the Sisters distributed food and clothing, operated a bread line, and helped their neighbors in emergencies. In 1940 Mother Marianne and the Sisters began their first major mission outside New York when they adapted the model of the urban Catholic social settlement to rural South Carolina. They also served at a number of parishes, including several in South Carolina and Florida, where they ministered to both black and white Catholics. In Neighbors and Missionaries, Margaret M. McGuinness, who was given full access to the archives of the Sisters of Christian Doctrine, traces in fascinating detail the history of the congregation, from the inspiring story of its founder and the community’s mission to provide material and spiritual support to their Catholic neighbors, to the changes and challenges of the latter half of the twentieth century. By 1960, settlement houses had been replaced by other forms of social welfare, and the lives and work of American women religious were undergoing a dramatic change. McGuinness explores how the Sisters of Christian Doctrine were affected and how they adapted their own lives and work to reflect the transformations taking place in the Church and society. Neighbors and Missionaries examines a distinctive community of women religious whose primary focus was neither teaching nor nursing/hospital administration. The choice of the Sisters of Christian Doctrine to live among the poor and to serve where other communities were either unwilling or unable demonstrates that women religious in the United States served in many different capacities as they contributed to the life and work of the American Catholic Church.

    • Christianity

      Seeking the Face of God

      by Karmen A. Booker

      When we seek God’s Face, we behold beauty and glory, which takes us beyond the tallest building story. Walking, running, and yielding toward God’s way on the straight and narrow path we will stay. A path full of love, joy, peace, and blessings, if we are faithful to trust God through our testings. O God, faithful and true, thanks for leading and guiding us always to you. © 1997 Karmen A. Booker **************** For more inspiring and encouraging poems by Karmen A. Booker, purchase her book, “Seeking the Face of God”.

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