• Christian social thought & activity
      October 2003

      Clashing Symbols

      An Introduction to Faith and Culture

      by Michael Paul Gallagher (By (author))

      What is the place of religious belief modern culture? Recent years have seen cataclysmic changes in society, yet, far from being banished from today's world, religion is assuming a new significance. Since its original publication in 1997, Clashing Symbols has become recognised as the most accessible and authoritative introduction to a crucial are in religious studies: the relationship between faith and culture. Michael Paul Gallagher introduces all the major figures, issues and debates in this ideal guide for students and thoughtful Christians who want to discern the realities of contemporary culture.

    • Self-help & personal development

      Keeping the Faith

      Daily Reflections to Build Strength, Serenity, and Passion in Your Life and the Lives of Others

      by John W. Pozzi

      THE TRUE FAITH THAT MUST BE FOUND AND KEPT IS THE FAITH IN ONESELF. Each day you give a part of yourself whether it is at work, at home, or in your daily interaction with others. How do you give of yourself? Do you hold back or go at life half-heartedly? You need to give of yourself with heart, mind, and soul all the time. You never know what interaction with a person will make a difference in their life — or yours. If you don’t believe in yourself and don’t have the confidence to grow each day, then you are missing out on what life has to offer you. This simple book will inspire you to help others. Or, at the very least, you will make another person’s day — and, therefore, your day — better.

    • Christian social thought & activity
      November 2003

      A New Map of the World

      by Ian Linden (By (author))

      ‘The world is on a trajectory that threatens the security, freedom and human rights of all of us, not just the poor’, writes Ian Linden. ‘Yet we also have an unprecedented opportunity to dismantle the global apartheid of rich and poor, and remove the root causes of war, terrorism, asylum seekers and economic migration.’ We are poised between a dying age of industrial production and the new information and network society, a world as yet uncharted and lacking a shared moral language. A New Map of the World is a not only a brilliant analysis of the state of the world, but of what might justly be said and done about it by individuals, communities and churches as well as by global institutions. Linden looks honestly at the failures of Christians and Muslims, socialists and radicals, to transform their visions of a just society into reality. He proposes a tentative new blueprint for the future that draws together the case for structural changes with the vital imperative for the formation of individual character.

    • Christian social thought & activity
      July 2002

      After Religion

      Generation X and the Search for Meaning

      by Gordon Lynch (By (author))

      After Religion explores people’s search for meaning in a postmodern world including the emergence of the ‘post-evangelical’ and ‘alternative worship’.

    • Christian social thought & activity
      January 2004

      Just Cohabiting?

      A Christian Re-evaluation of Living Together

      by Duncan James Dormor (By (author))

      A radical theological reappraisal of the church’s position on cohabitation before marriage. Most adults in Europe and North America now believe it is wiser to cohabit before marriage. Yet the church teaches, or is perceived to teach, that marriage begins with a ceremony in church and that sexual intercourse or cohabitation before that point constitutes transgression. Duncan Dormor offers a radical theological reappraisal of the church’s position, and suggests practical proposals for a new approach to living together in preparation for marriage. His positive re-evaluation of the contemporary practice of cohabitation is supported by arguments from scripture, history, psychology and sociology. This is a well-informed, lively and thought-provoking contribution to a hotly-contested area of debate in the churches.

    • Christian social thought & activity
      January 2010

      Time to Change

      An Ignatian Retreat in Everyday Life

      by Michael Campbell-Johnston (By (author))

      We all need to make a retreat. To find a few moments in our busy lives to try to stop worrying and fretting about so many different things, and to sit in silence at God’s feet and just to listen. A retreat is simply an attempt to see beyond the 101 cares and occupations we normally have and to ask ourselves, ‘Where it is all leading? What’s the purpose of it all?’ Time to Change takes the basic format and principles of The Spiritual Exercises of St Ignatius and allows us to make a retreat without interrupting too much your ordinary daily life and all the things you have to do.

    • Christian social thought & activity
      September 2005

      What Can One Person Do?

      Faith to Heal a Broken World

      by Sabina Alkire (By (author)), Edmund Newell (By (author))

      This book offers suggestions for real things that we can do to help bring the vision of a world without poverty a step closer. Imagine living on the equivalent of fifty pence a day – or less. That is the reality for over a billion people around the world right now. And the ‘prison of poverty’ is not just about money: it is about facing daily hunger, disease and premature death. It is about not having clean water to give your children, about not being able to give them access to the education that will make their lives different from yours. The eight Millennium Development Goals lay out a vision of halving extreme global poverty by 2015, providing a road map for tackling depravation, instability, HIV/AIDS, gender inequality and violence in virtually all parts of the world. All 189 member states of the United Nations have pledged themselves to the realisation of this vision, and the goals are backed up by a practical and achievable plan. What is needed is the will to make it happen. But what can we really do to help? Isn’t the problem just too enormous for individual churches, schools and communities to make a difference? What Can One Person Do? seeks to answer that question, offering practical suggestions for real things that we can do in our personal lives that can help to bring the vision of a world without poverty a step closer.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2013

      Social Media and Religious Change

      by Marie Gillespie, David Eric John Herbert, Anita Greenhill

      This volume offers unique insights into the mutually constitutive nature of social media practices and religious change. Part 1 examines how social media operate in conjunction with mass media in the construction of discourses of religion and spirituality. It includes: a longitudinal study of British news media coverage of Christianity, secularism and religious diversity (Knott et al.); an analysis of responses to two documentaries 'The Monastery' and 'The Convent' (Thomas); an evaluation of theories of the sacred in studies of religion and media within the 'strong program' in cultural sociology in the US (Lynch); and a study of the consequences of mass and social media synergies for public perceptions of Islam in the Netherlands (Herbert). Part 2 examines the role of social media in the construction of contemporary martyrs and media celebrities (e.g., Michael Jackson) using mixed and mobile methods to analyse fan sites (Bennett & Campbell) and jihadi websites and YouTube (Nauta). Part 3 examines how certain bounded religious communities negotiate the challenges of social media: Judaism in Second Life (Abrams & Baker); Bah'ai regulation of web use among members (Campbell & Fulton); YouTube evangelists (Pihlaja); and public expressions of bereavement (Greenhill & Fletcher). The book provides theoretically informed empirical case studies and presents an intriguing, complex picture of the aesthetic and ethical, demographic and discursive aspects of new spaces of communication and their implications for religious institutions, beliefs and practices.

    • Roman Catholicism, Roman Catholic Church
      April 2008

      Faith, Resistance, and the Future

      Daniel Berrigan's Challenge to Catholic Social Thought

      by Edited by James L. Marsh, and Anna J. Brown

    • Christian social thought & activity
      December 2007

      Raised by the Church

      Growing up in New York City's Catholic Orphanages

      by Edward Rohs, and Judith Estrine

    • Welfare & benefit systems

      Starting Where We Are

      The Story of a Neighbourhood Centre : Liberation Theology in Practice

      by Kathy. Galloway

      This is the story of the Orbison Neighbourhood Centre which is one of innovation and success as a community project. The approach taken was based on the principles of Liberation Theology - a methodology of change and empowerment which originate in Latin America and used for the first time in Scotland.;The cassette features stories of what the centre means to the people involved, interspersed with music from the World Church sung by the Wild Goose Worship Group.

    • Peace studies & conflict resolution

      Protest for Peace

      by Bernadette. Meaden

      Documenting the work of Christian peace activists whose radicalism often places them on the fringes of the Church, this book dispels the popular perception of Christians as conventional, respectable and passive. It explains the issues and recounts the personal experiences of some of those involved in various aspects of the peace movement, including clergy and lay people who have served prison sentences as a result of direct non-violent action and who are prepared to do so again. This alternative vision of what it means to be a Christian depicts a radical, compassionate faith that challenges the status quo, including the position of the churches themselves on peace issues.

    • Christian theology

      Dreaming of Eden

      Reflections On Christianity and Sexuality

      by Kathy. Galloway

    • Pollution & threats to the environment

      The Earth Under Threat

      A Christian Perspective

      by Ghillean T. Prance

    • Christian social thought & activity
      May 2012

      Go to the Ant

      Reflections On Biblical Biodiversity

      by Ghillean T. Prance

    • Personal Christian testimony & popular inspirational works

      Amazing Graces

      Pe-prandial Words of Spiritual Uplift to Grace Any Gathering

      by William J. Morris

      The Very Revd. William J. Morris has become famous for his unique ability to pen graces appropriate for formal dinners and professional gatherings. This book consists of some 150 graces suitable for people involved in trades' houses and merchants; medical and dental professions; the media, accountancy; industry & business; banking; the law; sport; schools and education; clubs, societies and associations; the church; chambers of commerce; motoring and the police. Here's an example for dentists: Lord, with this food may we be blessed, The talk be good; the wine, each guest, As warm or cool as may be right. These fellows school, Lord, so we might, As we may need, above, beneath, Whenever we feed, enjoy sound teeth!

    • Memoirs

      Ex-gay No Way

      Survival and Recovery from Religious Abuse

      by Jallen Rix

    • Christian social thought & activity

      The Bread of the Strong

      Lacouturisme and the Folly of the Cross, 1910–1985

      by Jack Lee Downey

      Contributing to the ongoing excavation of the spiritual lifeworld of Dorothy Day—“the most significant, interesting, and influential person in the history of American Catholicism”—The Bread of the Strong offers compelling new insight into the history of the Catholic Worker movement, including the cross-pollination between American and Quebecois Catholicism and discourse about Christian antimodernism and radicalism. The considerable perseverance in the heroic Christian maximalism that became the hallmark of the Catholic Worker’s personalism owes a great debt to the influence of Lacouturisme, largely under the stewardship of John Hugo, along with Peter Maurin and myriad other critical interventions in Day’s spiritual development. Day made the retreat regularly for some thirty-five years and promoted it vigorously both in person and publicly in the pages of The Catholic Worker. Exploring the influence of the controversial North American revivalist movement on the spiritual formation of Dorothy Day, author Jack Lee Downey investigates the extremist intersection between Roman Catholic contemplative tradition and modern political radicalism. Well grounded in an abundance of lesser-known primary sources, including unpublished letters, retreat notes, privately published and long-out-of-print archival material, and the French-language papers of Fr. Lacouture, The Bread of the Strong opens up an entirely new arena of scholarship on the transnational lineages of American Catholic social justice activism. Downey also reveals riveting new insights into the movement’s founder and namesake, Quebecois Jesuit Onesime Lacouture. Downey also frames a more reciprocal depiction of Day and Hugo’s relationship and influence, including the importance of Day’s evangelical pacifism on Hugo, particularly in shaping his understanding of conscientious objection and Christian antiwar work, and how Hugo’s ascetical theology animated Day’s interior life and spiritually sustained her apostolate. A fascinating investigation into the retreat movement Day loved so dearly, and which she claimed was integral to her spiritual formation, The Bread of the Strong explores the relationship between contemplative theology, asceticism, and radical activism. More than a study of Lacouture, Hugo, and Day, this fresh look at Dorothy Day and the complexities and challenges of her spiritual and social expression presents an outward exploration of the early- to mid–twentieth century dilemmas facing second- and third-generation American Catholics.

    • Christian social thought & activity

      The Bread of the Strong

      Lacouturisme and the Folly of the Cross, 1910–1985

      by Jack Lee Downey

      Contributing to the ongoing excavation of the spiritual lifeworld of Dorothy Day—“the most significant, interesting, and influential person in the history of American Catholicism”—The Bread of the Strong offers compelling new insight into the history of the Catholic Worker movement, including the cross-pollination between American and Quebecois Catholicism and discourse about Christian antimodernism and radicalism. The considerable perseverance in the heroic Christian maximalism that became the hallmark of the Catholic Worker’s personalism owes a great debt to the influence of Lacouturisme, largely under the stewardship of John Hugo, along with Peter Maurin and myriad other critical interventions in Day’s spiritual development. Day made the retreat regularly for some thirty-five years and promoted it vigorously both in person and publicly in the pages of The Catholic Worker. Exploring the influence of the controversial North American revivalist movement on the spiritual formation of Dorothy Day, author Jack Lee Downey investigates the extremist intersection between Roman Catholic contemplative tradition and modern political radicalism. Well grounded in an abundance of lesser-known primary sources, including unpublished letters, retreat notes, privately published and long-out-of-print archival material, and the French-language papers of Fr. Lacouture, The Bread of the Strong opens up an entirely new arena of scholarship on the transnational lineages of American Catholic social justice activism. Downey also reveals riveting new insights into the movement’s founder and namesake, Quebecois Jesuit Onesime Lacouture. Downey also frames a more reciprocal depiction of Day and Hugo’s relationship and influence, including the importance of Day’s evangelical pacifism on Hugo, particularly in shaping his understanding of conscientious objection and Christian antiwar work, and how Hugo’s ascetical theology animated Day’s interior life and spiritually sustained her apostolate. A fascinating investigation into the retreat movement Day loved so dearly, and which she claimed was integral to her spiritual formation, The Bread of the Strong explores the relationship between contemplative theology, asceticism, and radical activism. More than a study of Lacouture, Hugo, and Day, this fresh look at Dorothy Day and the complexities and challenges of her spiritual and social expression presents an outward exploration of the early- to mid–twentieth century dilemmas facing second- and third-generation American Catholics.

    • Christian social thought & activity

      The Bread of the Strong

      Lacouturisme and the Folly of the Cross, 1910–1985

      by Jack Lee Downey

      Contributing to the ongoing excavation of the spiritual lifeworld of Dorothy Day—“the most significant, interesting, and influential person in the history of American Catholicism”—The Bread of the Strong offers compelling new insight into the history of the Catholic Worker movement, including the cross-pollination between American and Quebecois Catholicism and discourse about Christian antimodernism and radicalism. The considerable perseverance in the heroic Christian maximalism that became the hallmark of the Catholic Worker’s personalism owes a great debt to the influence of Lacouturisme, largely under the stewardship of John Hugo, along with Peter Maurin and myriad other critical interventions in Day’s spiritual development. Day made the retreat regularly for some thirty-five years and promoted it vigorously both in person and publicly in the pages of The Catholic Worker. Exploring the influence of the controversial North American revivalist movement on the spiritual formation of Dorothy Day, author Jack Lee Downey investigates the extremist intersection between Roman Catholic contemplative tradition and modern political radicalism. Well grounded in an abundance of lesser-known primary sources, including unpublished letters, retreat notes, privately published and long-out-of-print archival material, and the French-language papers of Fr. Lacouture, The Bread of the Strong opens up an entirely new arena of scholarship on the transnational lineages of American Catholic social justice activism. Downey also reveals riveting new insights into the movement’s founder and namesake, Quebecois Jesuit Onesime Lacouture. Downey also frames a more reciprocal depiction of Day and Hugo’s relationship and influence, including the importance of Day’s evangelical pacifism on Hugo, particularly in shaping his understanding of conscientious objection and Christian antiwar work, and how Hugo’s ascetical theology animated Day’s interior life and spiritually sustained her apostolate. A fascinating investigation into the retreat movement Day loved so dearly, and which she claimed was integral to her spiritual formation, The Bread of the Strong explores the relationship between contemplative theology, asceticism, and radical activism. More than a study of Lacouture, Hugo, and Day, this fresh look at Dorothy Day and the complexities and challenges of her spiritual and social expression presents an outward exploration of the early- to mid–twentieth century dilemmas facing second- and third-generation American Catholics.

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