• Self-help & personal development

      Keeping the Faith

      Daily Reflections to Build Strength, Serenity, and Passion in Your Life and the Lives of Others

      by John W. Pozzi

      THE TRUE FAITH THAT MUST BE FOUND AND KEPT IS THE FAITH IN ONESELF. Each day you give a part of yourself whether it is at work, at home, or in your daily interaction with others. How do you give of yourself? Do you hold back or go at life half-heartedly? You need to give of yourself with heart, mind, and soul all the time. You never know what interaction with a person will make a difference in their life — or yours. If you don’t believe in yourself and don’t have the confidence to grow each day, then you are missing out on what life has to offer you. This simple book will inspire you to help others. Or, at the very least, you will make another person’s day — and, therefore, your day — better.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus

      The True Life and Trials of Nicholas of Myra

      by Adam C. English

      With his rosy cheeks and matching red suit—and ever-present elf and reindeer companions—Santa Claus may be the most identifiable of fantastical characters. But what do we really know of jolly old Saint Nicholas, "patron saint" of Christmastime? Ask about the human behind the suit, and the tale we know so well quickly fades into myth and folklore.In The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus, religious historian Adam English tells the true and compelling tale of Saint Nicholas, bishop of Myra. Around the fourth century in what is now Turkey, a boy of humble circumstance became a man revered for his many virtues. Chief among them was dealing generously with his possessions, once lifting an entire family out of poverty with a single--and secret--gift of gold, so legend tells. Yet he was much more than virtuous. As English reveals, Saint Nicholas was of integral influence in events that would significantly impact the history and development of the Christian church, including the Council of Nicaea, the destruction of the temple to Artemis in Myra, and a miraculous rescue of three falsely accused military officers. And Nicholas became the patron saint of children and sailors, merchants and thieves, as well as France, Russia, Greece, and myriad others.Weaving together the best historical and archaeological evidence available with the folklore and legends handed down through generations, English creates a stunning image of this much venerated Christian saint. With prose as enjoyable as it is informative, he shows why the life--and death--of Nicholas of Myra so radically influenced the formation of Western history and Christian thought, and did so in ways many have never realized. ; 1. Finding St. Nicholas2. Out of a Dying World Comes a Light3. Three Gifts and One Election4. The Work of Victory5. Riots, Beheadings, and Other Near Misfortunes6. Death Is Only the BeginningNotesRecommended ReadingsIndex

    • Humanities & Social Sciences

      Light in the Darkness

      Four Christian Apologists

      by Jon Elsby

      Christian apologetics is an important area of intellectual endeavour and achievement, standing at the boundaries between theology, philosophy and literature. Yet it has been largely neglected by historians of literature and ideas. In these essays, the author attempts to establish apologetics as a subject deserving of respect in its own right. He analyses the apologetic arguments and strategies of four of the greatest Christian apologists of the twentieth century – Hilaire Belloc, G. K. Chesterton, Dorothy L. Sayers, and C. S. Lewis. He shows how different lines of argument support each other and converge on the same conclusion: that what Chesterton called ‘orthodoxy’ and Lewis ‘mere Christianity’ represents the fundamental truth about the relations between human beings, the universe, and God.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2015

      Wrestling With the Angel

      A Convert's Tale

      by Jon Elsby

      Who am I? Am I an autonomous being, able to define myself by my own free choices, or a created being with a given human nature, living in a world which, in significant respects, does not depend on me? Are these two views necessarily opposed? Wrestling With the Angel is one man’s attempt to answer those questions. Raised as a Protestant, the author lost his faith in his teenage years, and then gradually regained it – but in an unexpected form. This is the story of a spiritual and intellectual journey from Protestantism to atheism, and beyond: a journey which finally, and much to the author’s surprise, reached its terminus in the Catholic Church.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2017

      Found Out

      Women’s faith in sexuality

      by Alison Webster

      More than twenty years after Found Wanting, her acclaimed critique of the Church and women’s sexuality, Alison Webster presents a positive book of practical theology that gives voice to the experiences of marginalised women. In response to the challenges of today, including people trafficking, greater exposure to internet pornography, a rise in mental ill-health, she puts forward a new model of faith identity based on Jesus as fundamentally a boundary-crosser (divine/human), reclaiming as positive the often painful place of being ‘in-between’, of not belonging.

    • Christian life & practice
      January 2008

      God of Surprises

      by Gerard W. Hughes (By (author))

      Jesus said, ‘The kingdom of God is like a treasure hidden in a field’. God of Surprises shows how we can find that treasure in the most unlikely of places – ourselves. Written for ‘bewildered, confused and disillusioned Christians’ as a guide for the inner spiritual journey in which we are all engaged, God of Surprises has much to say to those who have a love/hate relationship with the Church to which they belong or once belonged. This is an unforgettable book that has changed the lives of hundreds of thousands of readers. God of Surprises is also available as a course study package for groups, ideal for Lent use. Each pack includes an audio cassette and ten copies of the accompanying booklet. The booklet includes extracts from the original book plus new material written by Hughes for the course, and ends with suggestions for different ways of praying.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      Lasting Happiness

      The journey towards wholeness and fulfilment

      by Andrew Parnham

      The creator of The Happiness Course explores what it means to be happy, why being happy is so important to us, and what it may require from us to attain happiness. Andy Parnham shows that finding happiness means searching for wholeness and fulfilment, and is a journey that may not be easy and may not be the path we expected. The book includes a section for people of faith, but has been written for everyone.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2017

      Reclaiming the Common Good

      How Christians can help re-build our broken world

      by Virginia Moffatt

      After decades of political consensus, we are entering a time in which everything about the way we live today, and about how our society and communities are structured, is up for discussion. Many people are feeling empowered to ask: What kind of world do we want to live in? One that works for a few, or one that works for the common good? What part can Christians play in building a future of hope, peace, equality an justice? Reclaiming the Common Good is a collection of essays which consider these themes. Beginning with an explanation of the history and meaning of the term ‘common good’, it explores how the sense of working for this ideal has been lost. Focussing, biblically, on issues such as welfare, austerity, migration, environment, peace and justice, it provides a compellingly fresh and insightful analysis on the state of the world today, and offers a realistic vision of how it could be better. This vision is rooted in the idea of a new heaven, a new earth, and a new Jerusalem, as suggested in the book of Revelation. This collection has been compiled and edited by Virginia Moffatt, a writer, community activist and former Chief Operating Officer of the belief and values think-tank, Ekklesia. Its other contributors are: Dr Patrick Riordan SJ, John Moffatt SJ, Simon Barrow, Bernadette Meaden, Dr Simon Duffy, Rev. Vaughan Jones, Savitri Hensman , Ellen Teague, Edward P. Echlin, Henrietta Cullinan, Susan Clarkson and Rev. Dr Simon Woodman.

    • Christian aspects of sexuality, gender & relationships
      May 2016

      This is my body

      Hearing the theology of transgender Christians

      by Christina Beardsley (By (author)), Michelle O'Brien (By (author))

      Much has been said and written about Trans people by theologians and church leaders, but little has been heard from Trans Christians themselves. This book collects the theological reflections of the Sibyls, a major spirituality group for transgender people and their allies. It offers a comprehensive review of existing theological, cultural and scientific literature, together with people’s experience of gender dissonance that involves negotiating the boundaries between one’s identity and religious faith.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      Transfaith

      A Transgender Pastoral Care Handbook

      by Chris Dowd

      A resource for ministers and congregations who want to begin to understand and/or welcome transgender people into their congregations. The book has the following aims: to give the results of the first research based project into the experiences of trans Christians in the UK; to provide a theological and biblical framework in which ministers and congregations can begin to understand the insights and issues transgender people bring; to provide a series of insights that inform the pastoral care of transgender people, their families and friends; to provide resources in the form of liturgies and Bible studies that can be used by ministers and congregations exploring and/or experiencing these issues.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2018

      Untruth

      Musing with Kierkegaard on Christian Living in Fractured World

      by Michael Stark

      Soren Kierkegaard was a leading philosopher of his day, and a prophet for us living in the 21st Century today. Based in the teaching of Kierkegaard, author Michael Stark explores what it means to life authentically and as a ‘true Christian’. His chapters explore contemporary topics such as politics, the media, the Internet, relationships and anxiety. The book as a whole aims to make the philosophy of Kierkegaard accessible to a wide readership, offering substance and perspective to live well in a pluralist world.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2017

      Waiting on the Word

      Preaching sermons which connect people with God

      by Lorraine Cavanagh

      The preacher’s task is to make it possible for their listeners to meet Jesus Christ in their own lives, rather than to simply ‘convert’ them. To this end, preachers must connect with those they are speaking to in ways which help them make sense of the Christian faith in their own circumstances and in the times we live in. Waiting on the Word poses a series of questions that go to the heart of the preacher’s own vocation: - What do people expect from a sermon? - What are their pastoral and intellectual needs? - How can the preacher feel confident that he or she has the words needed to meet the spiritual, ethical and political challenges of today? - How can he or she develop ‘presence’?

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2018

      Just Love

      A journey of self-acceptance

      by Jayne Ozanne

      From one of the UK's most widely-respected gay evangelicals comes a powerful faith memoir of overcoming inner conflict and taking a stand against one of the greatest institutional injustices of our time. Just Love is the autobiography of Jayne Ozanne, a prominent gay Anglican, who struggled for over 40 years to reconcile her faith with her sexuality before becoming one of the leading figures that is ushering in a new era of LGBTI acceptance in the Church. Jayne’s story includes: a faith journey in which she became a founding member of the Church of England’s Archbishops’ Council, working in charities she has set up that has taken her from the White House to the jungles of Burma; studying as a Visiting Research Fellow at Oxford University to working alongside international figures such as Tony Blair and the Vicar of Baghdad; becoming hospitalised as she attempted to find ‘healing’ from her sexuality, and then ostracised by many Christians after she finally decided she had no choice but to come out; becoming a high-profile campaigner for LGBTI acceptance in the Church and helping to lead the revolt in the General Synod that overturned the House of Bishops’ report on same-sex marriage. Jayne’s story serves as a lifeline for LGBTI Christians struggling to reconcile their faith with their sexuality.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Coming Home

      by Jon Elsby

      Coming Home looks, in the broadest sense, at the Catholic Church and the phenomenon of conversion. It considers, among other things, the varied components of Catholic identity; the complex, multifaceted relations between Catholicism and postmodernism, and between Church doctrine and pastoral praxis; and the controversies between so-called conservatives and liberals over the direction the Church should take in the future. The Catholic Church, with its 2,000 years of accumulated doctrine and definition, claims to be the one and only divinely appointed repository of religious truth and wisdom, authoritatively taught and preserved for transmission to posterity. No other institution makes such a claim. It would be unwise to dismiss that claim in accordance with some dogmatic presupposition rather than weighing it impartially according to the evidence. Coming Home invites the reader to consider all the evidence before making up his or her own mind.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2018

      Pluralization and social change

      Dynamics of lived religion in South Africa and in Germany

      by Lars Charbonnier, Johan Cilliers, Matthias Mader, Cas Wepener, Birgit Weyel

      How can be described the pluralization of the religious realm, which is of great significance for processes of social change? How can it be done in an international perspective? The book sharps the idea of religious pluralization exactly by elucidating it against the backdrop of concrete religious phenomena and practices. The concepts and interpretations of religious praxis are correlated here in a way that has proven most fruitful in the field of Practical Theology. The book entails contributions regarding twelve topics that are formative for the practical-theological discourses in South Africa and Germany, and which are currently regarded as being of high relevance (poverty and wealth, education, transitional rites and passages, health, religious community formation and the future of the Church, beginning and end of life, transformation of the media, migration and interculturality, populism and radicalization in religion and knowledge, processing of the past, communal living). One author from one of these countries contributes to one of these topics, in the form of a introduction. An author from the respective other country reacts to the contribution by writing a response. This conversational procedure contributes to a contextual theology that understands theology essentially as a dialogue. In all contributions is pluralization the overarching topic. Pluralization, thus, shall be developed as a conception and theory respectively, both of which is not self-evident but whose theoretical implications must be explicitly unfolded.

    • Christian life & practice
      January 2015

      Walking with Jesus

      The Heart of Christian Life

      by Pope Francis (By (author))

      Pope Francis believes that every single action we perform should take us a step closer to God and to our neighbour. The image of ‘walking’ is central to his teaching for us as individuals and as a Church. Through faith in Jesus we can walk beyond our walls with confidence, reaching out to those we meet on the road and on the very outskirts of human existence where the cries of the poor, the marginalised and the oppressed can be heard. Walking with Jesus presents the heart of his teaching on this theme, arranged and edited as a single book for the first time and with the full approval of the Vatican Publishing House. Like his first book The Church of Mercy, it is indispensable reading for all believers. It includes a Preface by Giuliano Vigini, Professor of the Sociology of Contemporary Publishing at the Catholic University of Milan.

    • Christian life & practice
      June 2009

      What Makes a Good City? Public Theology and the Urban Church

      by Stephen Lowe (By (author)), Elaine Graham (By (author))

      The Faithful Cities report (2006) identified the question "What makes a good city?" as a key catalyst for thinking about the future of our cities and towns. Elaine Graham and Stephen Lowe explore this question in depth in this groundbreaking work of practical theology.

    • Christian life & practice
      August 2015

      When Silence Speaks

      The Spiritual Way of the Carthusian Order

      by Tim Peeters (By (author))

      True solitude is a rare experience in today’s busy world. For many people it has negative connotations, but for the Carthusian monks it is a blessing. They have given up everything in order to share in the desert experience of Jesus and to continue the ancient traditions of the Desert Fathers, who searched for God in the realms of silence. When Silence Speaks uncovers the deep spiritual foundations on which this remarkable and mysterious order of hermits has built for more than nine centuries: solitude and silence, separation and simplicity, contemplation and prayer, asceticism and perseverance. It includes an anthology of the original spiritual literature of the Carthusian tradition, the testimonies of monks who still follow the Carthusian way today, and a selection of photographs that provide a rare window into their world away from the world. ‘To understand what is almost incomprehensible,’ writes author Tim Peeters, ‘we will take a walk with Saint Bruno and the Carthusian monks. We will climb into the high mountains of the Chartreuse massif near Grenoble [in France] where the origins of the order are situated. We will watch over the walls of the monasteries and enter into the cells and the hearts of the monks. And we hope you will taste something of the ultimate goal of this solitary and silent life: God, who speaks when the Carthusian listens and keeps quiet.’ The original Dutch version of this book received the award for Religious Book of the Year in Belgium. It has also been published in French and Italian.

    • Christian life & practice
      February 2010

      Work! For God's Sake

      Christian Ethics in the Workplace

      by Esther D. Reed (By (author))

      What is the spiritual meaning of work in our lives? If you won £1m in the TV game-show Who Wants to be a Millionaire? would you go into work the following Monday morning? Is work something irksome that must be endured so that we may eat, enjoy quality leisure time, and retire as early as possible? Is it more integral to personal identity and one of the blessings of God’s creation? The twin problems of today’s ‘high-pressure, burn-out’ workplaces and unemployment make some Christian theologies of vocation seem idealistic. The global implications of the West’s lust for cheap consumer goods pose major challenges to any moral case for prosperity. In Work! For God’s Sake, Esther Reed tackles these questions within a biblical framework, and sketches a theological ethic of work in the hope of God’s coming kingdom.

    • Personal Christian testimony & popular inspirational works
      June 2015

      Under One Roof

      The Story of a Christian Community

      by Roger Sawtell (By (author))

      In 1984 Roger Sawtell and his wife Susan and another couple decided to form a residential Christian community – a community of households living under one roof – by combining two neighbouring houses on a suburban street in Northampton. The Neighbours Community grew to encompass four neighbouring houses and was a home to more than 50 people over the course of 23 years. The members lived in simple Christian fellowship according to New Testament principles and shared their home with people who had particular need for support, particularly those with mental health difficulties. Under One Roof is a unique and inspiring book which tells the story of The Neighbours Community and – as a guide for others interested in the principles of living in community – looks at the wider world movement of communities and new monasticism, with examples such as the Iona Community, L’Arche, Taizé and Quaker communities.

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